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Full text of "The Owens College, Manchester (founded 1851); a brief history of the college and description of its various departments"

JOHN OWENS. 

(FROM A MEDALLION BY T WOOLNER. R.A.) 



t> II: H. fiirltrr. H'iHUHften. MamklOrr. 



Callalyft by II 



THE OWENS COLLEGE, 
MANCHESTER: 

(FOUNDED 1851) 



A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE 



AND 



DESCRIPTION OF ITS VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS. 



EDITED BY 

,\v? ^r 

F J! HARTOG, B.Sc. (LOND. AND VICT.), 

Licencie-h-Sciences Physiques (Paris); Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in Chemistry 
and late Berkeley Fellow of the Owens College. 




MANCHESTER : J. E. CORNISH. 

WATERLOW AND SONS LIMITED, PRINTERS, LONDON WALL, LONDON. 

I9OO. 



PREFACE. 



THE present work owes its origin, in part, to a request 
from the Committee of the Education Exhibition, held 
in London in January last, that the authorities of the 
Owens College should furnish an account of the Institution for 
that Exhibition (') and for the Paris Exhibition, to which it 
was preliminary ; in part, to the desire of the authorities of the 
College for a record of its development and present condition, 
in celebration of its jubilee. The Editor was requested to 
expand for this purpose an article on the technical side of the 
College, contributed by him to the Record of Technical and 
Secondary Education in 1895, so as to form a comprehensive 
description of the Institution as a whole. 

The sections dealing with special departments have in 
some cases been drawn up by, and in all cases submitted to 
and approved by, the heads of those departments ( 2 ). For the 
general plan and the rest of the work the Editor is respon- 
sible. He desires, however, gratefully to acknowledge much 

(') A portion of the book, together with the illustrations, v/as bound and 
exhibited at the London Exhibition ; the complete work has been sent to the Paris 
Exhibition. 

( 2 ) These various sections are written approximately on the same model, but a 
selection of the more interesting features in each department has been preferred to 
rigorous uniformity. 



help and many fruitful suggestions from the Principal, who 
has seen nearly the whole work in manuscript or proof; and 
also from Mr. Sydney Chaffers, the Registrar, who has in 
addition given the most untiring and invaluable assistance 
in consulting the College records. He is further indebted 
for aid of various kinds, and for criticisms, to Professor 
Dixon, to Mr. Edward Donner, to Mr. Edward Fiddes, 
Secretary to the Council and Senate, to Professor Tout, 
to Mr. W. E. Rhodes, the College Librarian, to Dr. 
R. B. Wild, to Professor Wilkins, and to several 
other members of the executive and teaching bodies 
of the College ; and he has to thank Mr. Alfred Brothers, 
Mr. R. D. Darbishire, the Rev. Principal James Drummond, 
of Manchester College, Oxford, Mr. F. J. Faraday, Mr. Alfred 
Hughes, Registrar of the Victoria University, Mr. Lionel 
Jacob, B.A., the Very Rev. Dean Kitchin, Warden of Durham 
University, and Sir Edward Durning-Lawrence, Bart., M.P., 
for valuable information. Messrs. Alfred Waterhouse and Son 
have kindly supplied the drawing of the ground floor plan ; 
Messrs. Beyer, Peacock, and Co. have permitted the portrait of 
Mr. C. F. Beyer to be reproduced as an illustration ; and 
Mr. W. H. Fischer, of Withington, has taken great trouble 
with the photographs of various parts of the College which 
were made specially for the book. The Editor desires further 
to acknowledge the care and courtesy with which Messrs. 
Waterlow and Sons have carried out their instructions in the 
printing of the book and reproduction of the illustrations. 



The selection of facts given in the greater portion of the 
work was imposed naturally by the plan. The chapter on the 
History of the College falls into another category ; and here 
the difficulty in dealing with personal services rendered to the 
College has been extreme. Only a few names could be men- 
tioned among many, in so brief a space ; and the allusions are 
often, of necessity, inadequate. It would require a perusal of 
the minutes of Court, Council, and Senate to form an estimate 
of the help given to the College by many connected with it, 
officially and unofficially, whose sole desire has been to give 
that help, and who have avoided public recognition of any 
kind. From its earliest days down to the present time the 
College has never wanted for such enthusiastic and unselfish 
service. Mr. Thompson's comprehensive book on " The Owens 
College," to which the great indebtedness of the present \vork 
is acknowledged elsewhere, fortunately supplies many of its 
deficiencies, and contains full details with regard to most of 
the persons connected with the early history of the College. 

The original plan included a list of the more distinguished 
former students of the College ; but the task of selection proved 
too ungrateful to be pursued. It is hoped that a complete 
Register of Former Students may be published before long by 
Mr. Henry Brierley, whose affection for his alma mater and 
skill as an antiquarian are equally well known in Lancashire. 

It is with deep regret that the Editor has to record the 
loss which the College has suffered by the recent deaths of 



three members of the staff Mr. Tom Jones, Professor of 
Surgery, who died in South Africa ; Dr. D. J. Leech, Professor 
of Materia Medica and Therapeutics ; and the Rev. L. M. 
Simmons, Lecturer in Hebrew and Arabic. 
July, i goo. P. J- H. 

NOTE. 

The following conventions have been employed in Chapters VI., 
VII., VIII., and IX. 

(i.) The figures in parentheses placed after the names of present 
members of the teaching staff denote dates of appointment. 

(ii.) Dates of appointment or resignation given are those from 
which the appointment or resignation has taken effect. 
Temporary appointments have not been included. 

(Hi.) In order to save constant cross-references, a dagger (f) is 
placed after the names of present and former members of 
the teaching staff who have either simultaneously or at 
different times filled different posts. The index will enable 
the reader to conszilt all the references to each person named. 

(iv.) Degrees and other distinctions appended to the names of 
former members of the staff are, as far as can be ascer- 
tained, those to which they have ultimately become entitled. 

(v.) Abbreviations such as "(2 hrs.}" "(j Ars.)" have been used to 
denote the weekly number of hours given in lecture-courses, etc. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

PREFACE i 

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS vii 

I. HISTORY OF THE OWENS COLLEGE i 

APPENDIX. THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS AT THE OWENS COLLEGE IN 

SUCCESSIVE SESSIONS (1851-2 TO 1899-1900) 22 

II. GOVERNMENT AND ADMINISTRATION 23 

III. FINANCE 29 

IV. BUILDINGS 35 

V. THE RELATION OF THE COLLEGE TO THE VICTORIA UNI- 
VERSITYUNIVERSITY COURSES OF STUDY 37 

VI. THE ARTS, SCIENCE, AND LAW DEPARTMENT: 

(i.) CLASSICS 43 

(2.) ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE ... ... ... ... 45 

(3.) MODERN AND ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 47 

(4.) PHILOSOPHY 49 

(5.) HISTORY 50 

(6.) ECONOMICS 52 

(7.) GEOGRAPHY 53 

(8.) MATHEMATICS 53 

(9.) PHYSICS 54 

(10.) ENGINEERING ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 59 

(u.) CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY 64 

(12.) ZOOLOGY 72 

(13.) BOTANY ... 74 

(14.) GEOLOGY ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 76 

(15.) EDUCATION (INCLUDING THE DAY TRAINING COLLEGE FOK 

TEACHERS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS) : 78 

(16.) LAW 82 

(17.) HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPOSITION 86 

(18.) THE DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN ... ... ... ... ... 86 

(19.) HIGHER COMMERCIAL EDUCATION ... ... ... ... ... 88 

(20.) UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COURSES POPULAR LECTURES AND EVENING 

CLASSES 90 



PACK 

VII. THE MEDICAL DEPARTMENT : 

(i.) GENERAL STATEMENT 93 

(2.) PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, ZOOLOGY, AND BOTANY 93 

(3.) ANATOMY... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 94 

(4.) PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY ... ... ... ... ... ... 95 

(5.) MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY, AND THERAPEUTICS 98 

(6.) PATHOLOGY, MORBID ANATOMY, AND BACTERIOLOGY 101 

(7.) MEDICINE 105 

(8.) SURGERY ... ... ... ... ... ... - ... ... ... 106 

(9.) OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY ... ... ... ... ... 108 

(10.) FORENSIC MEDICINE AND TOXICOLOGY 108 

(n.) PUBLIC HEALTH 109 

(12.) OPHTHALMOLOGY... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 109 

(13.) DISEASES OF CHILDREN 109 

(14.) MENTAL DISEASES ... ... ... ... ... ... ... no 

(15.) SPECIAL DISEASES : (i.) SKIN DISEASES. (ii.) DISEASES OF THE 
EAR. (iii.) DISEASES OF THE LARYNX, (iv.) DISEASES OF THE 
RESPIRATORY ORGANS. (v.) DISEASES OF THE HEART. 
(vi.) TROPICAL DISEASES. ... ... ... ... ... iio-in 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH: 

(16.) GENERAL STATEMENT in 

THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT : 

(17.) GENERAL STATEMENT ... : 112 

(18.) DENTAL ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY ... ... ... ... ... 113 

(19.) DENTAL HISTOLOGY 113 

(20.) DENTAL SURGERY AND PATHOLOGY ... ... ... ... ... 113 

(21.) PRACTICAL AND OPERATIVE DENTAL SURGERY 113 

(22.) DENTAL MECHANICS ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 113 

(23.) DENTAL METALLURGY 114 

THE PHARMACEUTICAL DEPARTMENT : 

(24.) GENERAL STATEMENT 114 

(25.) THE MANCHESTER MEDICAL SOCIETY'S LIBRARY ... ... ... 114 

(26.) HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION ... 115 

VIII. THE LIBRARY . ... 117 



( vii ) 

I' AGE 

IX. THE MANCHESTER MUSEUM ... 121 

X. COLLEGE SOCIETIES, ATHLETICS, ETC. : 

(i.) COLLEGE SOCIETIES 125 

(2.) THE ATHLETIC UNION AND THE ATHLETIC GROUND 126 

(3.) THE HOLT GYMNASIUM 127 

(4.) THE COLLEGE VOLUNTEER COMPANY ... 128 

(5.) THE MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT 128 

XI. THE HALLS OF RESIDENCE: 

(i.) DALTON HALL 129 

(2.) HULME HALL ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 129 

(3.) THE HALL OF RESIDENCE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS (ASHBURNE HOUSE, 

VICTORIA PARK) ... ... ... ... ... ... ... 130 

XII. FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, PRIZES, ETC. : 

(i.) UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS, STUDENTSHIP, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND 

ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS 132 

(2.) COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS AND STUDENTSHIPS 134 

(3.) COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS, EXHIBITIONS, AND PRIZES 137 

(4.) COLLEGE ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBITIONS ... ... 143 

XIII. PORTRAITS AND OTHER WORKS OF ART IN THE POSSESSION 

OF THE COLLEGE 147 

XIV. THE ASSOCIATES ... ... ... 153 

XV. RECORD OF ORIGINAL PUBLICATIONS BY MEMBERS OF THE 

VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS OF THE COLLEGE, 1851-1900 ... 155 

INDEX 245 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

1. JOHN OWENS (FROM A MEDALLION BY T. WOOLNER, R.A.) FRONTISPIECE. 

TO PACK PACK 

2. GEORGE FAULKNER (FROM A PAINTING BY B. R. FAULKNER) 2 

3. CHARLES FREDERICK BEYER (FROM A PORTRAIT BY THE CHEVALIER 

SCHMID) 10 

4. SIR JOSEPH WHITWORTH, BART., F.R.S 14 

5. THE QUADRANGLE 35 

6. THE PRINCIPAL STAIRCASE ... 36 



TO FACE PAGE 

7. THE CENTRAL BUILDING, CORRIDOR FIRST FLOOR 43 

8. THE PHYSICAL LABORATORIES EXTERIOR 56 

9. THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT THE WHITWORTH LABORA- 

TORY 60 

10. THE ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT THE EXPERIMENTAL ENGINES 62 

11. THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT THE GENERAL LECTURE 

THEATRE 64 

12. THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT THE QUANTITATIVE LABORA- 

TORY ... 66 

13. THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT THE SCHORLEMMER LABORA- 

TORY (FOR ORGANIC CHEMISTRY) 68 

14. THE ZOOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT THE LABORATORY FOR 

PRACTICAL CLASSES 72 

15. THE COMMON ROOM FOR WOMEN STUDENTS .V. ... 88 

16. THE MEDICAL SCHOOI 93 

17. THE PHYSIOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT THE LECTURE ROOM ... 95 

18. THE EXPERIMENTAL LABORA- 

TORY FOR PRACTICAL CLASSES 96 

19. THE HISTOLOGICAL LABORA- 

TORY 98 

20. THE PATHOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT THE LABORATORY FOR 

PRACTICAL CLASSES IN MORBID HISTOLOGY 101 

21. THE CHRISTIE LIBRARY EXTERIOR 117 

22. THE CHRISTIE LIBRARY READING ROOM AND REFERENCE 

LIBRARY 118 

23. THE MANCHESTER MUSEUM GROUND FLOOR 121 

24. FIRST FLOOR 124 

25. THE HOLT GYMNASIUM 127 

26. DALTON HALL 129 

27. HULME HALL ... 130 

28. THE HALL OF RESIDENCE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS (ASHBURNE 

HOUSE) 131 

29 GROUND FLOOR PLAN OF THE OWENS COLLEGE (EXCLUDING THE 

PHYSICAL LABORATORIES) ... ... .. ... ... ... ... 260 



L-History of the Owens College/ 



On March 2Oth, 1640 (O.S.), Henry Fairfax, uncle to the great Early attempts 

to found a 

General Fairfax, forwarded a petition drawn up at a public meeting in University in 

Manchester. 

Manchester, begging Parliament to establish a Northern University in 
the town ; but the jealousy of the city of York killed the project, and 
the Northern University of the Commonwealth was established at 
Durham, only to be abolished at the Restoration/ 2 ' 

The next attempt was made in 1783, when a "College of Arts The College 

of Arts and 



and Sciences" was founded, with the help of the Manchester Literary 

and Philosophical Society (itself only two years old) ; and this was ter Academ >-- 

followed shortly after by the "Manchester Academy," founded in 1786, 

and illustrated by the great name of John Dalton, the chemist, who 

came from Kendal to join its staff. The College of Sciences and Arts 

was short-lived ; and the Manchester Academy left Manchester for York 

in 1803. 

In 1825, Thomas Turner, a surgeon, founded a Medical School The Royal 

Manchester 

in Manchester, the first of its kind in the provinces; and in 1836 the Schooiof 

Medicine 

School, on the ground of its seniority and efficiency, received the title and Surgery. 
of " The Royal Manchester School of Medicine and Surgery." 

But general education at the time had fallen to a low ebb in the 
town ; the rapid development of the cotton trade absorbed the interests 
of the population ; boys were taken away early from school ; and the 

(I) For the material of this Chapter, down to the year 1886, the writer is greatly indebted 
to Mr. Joseph Thompson's The Owens College ; its foundation and Growth (published by 
J. E. Cornish, 1886), and also to Mr. John E. Bailey's article On a proposed University in 
Manchester in 1640-1 (reprinted from the Manchester City News, 5th July, 1879). 

(s> The present University of Durham was founded in 1832, and received its charter 
in 1837. 

C 



Grammar School did not then spend half its endowment of over ,4,000 

a year. The local learned societies and institutions were not indifferent 

to the evil, and members of the Manchester Royal Institution, of the 

Proposals to Athenaeum, and, above all, of the Statistical Society, sought a remedy. 

establish a * 

}s U 6 CTsily '" * n J ^ 6 ^ r> Harry Longueville Jones read before the Statistical Society 
a paper entitled " A Plan of a University for the town of Manchester." 
Mr. James Heywood, F.R.S., had the paper printed at his own expense, 
and the idea was taken up eagerly. Mr. Turner and the staff of the 
School of Medicine proposed, in November, 1836, to create a College 
with Faculties of Arts and Medicine, to be connected with the London 
University, established by Charter a few months previously. But, owing 
to jealousy between Turner's school and a rival medical school in 
Marsden Street, the scheme fell through. The Royal School of Medicine 
continued its independent existence. 

A. decision of the Manchester New College the former Manchester 
Academy, which had returned to Manchester in 1840 with this new title- 
to open its doors to a wider audience, proved equally fruitless, in spite 
of the distinction of a staff which included Francis William Newman 
and James Martineau. (l) 

Foundation The foundation of the Owens College is due to two men, John 

of the Owens 

College. Owens and his friend, George Faulkner, who, it is said on good 
authority, refused to become Owens' heir and persuaded Owens to leave 
his money for the foundation of a college. 

John Owens, eldest son of Owen Owens, of Holy well in Flintshire, 
and his wife, Sarah Humphreys, was born in Manchester in 1790. He 
became a partner in his father's business, which was first that of a " hat- 



11 This Institution, still under the same name, removed to London in 1853, and thence 
to Oxford as "Manchester College, Oxford," in 1889. It is now a College "for the study 
of Religion, Theology, and Philosophy, without insisting upon the adoption of particular 
doctrines." 




GEORGE FAULKNER. 
FIRST CHAIRMAN OF THE OWENS TRUSTEES. 

(From a painting by Benjamin Ralvlinsox Favlkner, 



( 3 ) 

lining manufacturer and furrier," and then of a merchant. Later, John 
Owens became a partner with George and Samuel Faulkner as a fine 
spinner. He died, a bachelor, at his house, The Limes, in Nelson Street, 
on 29th July, 1846. Shy and reserved in general, Owens was known 
to express strong views with regard to the injustice of the religious 
disabilities imposed on Dissenters at Oxford and Cambridge' ; so that 
Faulkner, himself a strong Churchman and Tory, in proposing the founda- 
tion of an unsectarian college, hit upon a plan that he knew would be 
welcome, and that, later, as Chairman of Owens' Trustees, he was chief 
in carrying out with splendid energy and loyalty. 

The object of the College was stated by the founder's will to be " for 
providing or aiding the means of instructing and improving young persons 
of the male sex (and being of an age of not less than fourteen years) in such 
branches of learning and science as are usually taught in the English 
Universities, but subject, nevertheless, to the two following fundamental 
and immutable rules and conditions, that the students, professors, teachers, 
and others connected with the said institution, shall not be required to make 
any declaration as to, or submit to any test of, their religious opinions, and 
that nothing shall be introduced in the matter, or mode of education or 
instruction in reference to any religious or theological subject which shall be 
reasonably offensive to the conscience of any student, or of his relations, 
guardians, or friends." 

The sum realised for the purpose of the College was .96,954. Spent 
on buildings, with an insufficient endowment left for a teaching staff, Owens' 
bequest would probably have produced an institution of the second class. 
The ultimate rise of the College is largely due to the founder's decision that 
his endowment was to be spent mainly on the provision of an adequate 
teaching staff from the first. It is easier to obtain money for bricks and mortar 
than for men. The trustees rented for the College a large private house in 

(I) Not finally removed till the passing of the Universities Tests Act in 1871. 



( 4 ) 



Opening of 
the Owens 
College, 
March 12, 
1851. 



Quay Street, formerly inhabited by Richard Cobden.(') It was later presented 
to the College by Mr. Faulkner, and the gift of land and buildings was 
valued at about ,8,400. A Chemical Laboratory was added at once with 
the help of a supplementary fund of .9,550 raised by subscribers for that and 
other purposes. It may be noted that almost from the outset the Chemical 
Department of the College has been specially successful, first under Dr. (later 
Sir Edward) Frankland, and then under Sir Henry Roscoe, who held the 
professorship for thirty years (1857-1887), and to whom its great develop- 
ment is largely due. In a manufacturing district the scientific side of a college 
is naturally favoured. But from the first, and throughout the history of the 
College, continual efforts have been made to keep a just balance between 
Science and Arts. On March i2th, 1851, the College was opened with the 
following staff of five professors and two teachers : Principal and Professor 
of Logic, Mental and Moral Philosophy, and of English Language and 
Literature, ALEXANDER JOHN SCOTT, M.A. (previously Professor of English 
Literature in University College, London) ; Professor of the Languages and 
Literatures of Greece and Rome, and of Ancient and Modern History, 
JOSEPH GOUGE GREENWOOD, B.A. ; Professor of Mathematics, ARCHIBALD 
SANDEMAN, M.A. ; Professor of Chemistry, EDWARD FRANKLAND, Ph.D. ; 
Professor of Natural History, Botany, and Geology, WILLIAM CRAWFORD 
WILLIAMSON ; Teacher of German, Hebrew, and Oriental Languages, 
TOBIAS THEODORES ; and Teacher of French, A. PODEVIN. 

The growth of the College is strikingly illustrated by the fact that the 
present staff consists of 30 Professors, 34 independent Lecturers,( 2 ) and 39 
Demonstrators and Assistant Lecturers. 

The Principal, a man of singular personal influence, vehement, 
earnest, and clear of speech, ( 3 ) impressed on the College from the begin 

(') The building is now used as the Manchester County Court. 

(')The title of "Lecturer" is, as a rule, only given to lecturers who are also heads 
of departments. 

( 3 )Cf. Froude's Life of Carfyle, ii., 177. 



( 5 ) 

ning, his own lofty ideal of University culture. But organization was lacking, 

and success did not come at once. The number of day students, 62 in the 

first session, had dropped in 1856-7 to 33. In 1857 Mr. Scott resigned the 

Principalship, owing to ill-health ; he retained his Professorship till his death 

in 1866. Professor Greenwood became Principal, and retained this post till Appointment 

his resignation in 1889. In 1857 the day students had not increased in Greenwood s 

numbers, and the evening students had seriously diminished. The College 

was pronounced by the local newspapers to be "a mortifying failure," the The College 

pronounced 

victim of its over-ambitious aims. The staff replied that the state of the " a mortifying 

failure." 

College was due to the want of adequate secondary schools in Manchester to 
feed it with students, and one of the professors actually proposed to convert 
the institution into a high-class school. But the trustees and the majority of 
the staff pursued their course steadily. A proposal in 1858, due to Mr. J. D. 
Morell, one of H.M. Inspectors, to establish in connection with the College 
a training College for elementary teachers, with a subvention from 
Government, was rejected. The next session, 1858-9, showed a recovery Continued 
in the number of day students, and from that date till the present the 1858." 
number has augmented with but slight fluctuations from 40 to 1,002 in 
1899-1900. 

Evening classes for general students, and special schoolmasters' classes Evening 

Classes. 

held in the evening had been started almost from the beginning; in 1861 the 
College absorbed the MANCHESTER WORKING MAN'S COLLEGE, which had 
been founded in 1858, as a result of Frederick Denison Maurice's movement 
in London, (') and officered chiefly by members of the Owens College staff. 
For many years the evening classes continued to grow, until in 1873-4 
the numbers reached a maximum of 889. Through these classes the 
College kept in touch on the one hand with men in business, on the other 
with working men : the contact with influential citizens of both classes was 
of the greatest possible benefit alike to the College and to the community. 

( l ) The WORKING MEN'S COLLEGE, Great Ormond Street, London, founded in 1854, is 
still a flourishing institution. 

D 



( 6 ) 

Later, the multiplication of Science and Art Schools, and of Technical 
Schools in various parts of the city under the Technical Instruction Acts 
of 1889 and 1890 replaced the more elementary classes ; and it was decided 
to continue only the more advanced teaching. It can hardly be said that a 
final policy in the matter of the evening classes has yet been reached. 

To return to the main work of the College. In 1864 the day 

students had increased to 127, and with 312 evening students in addition, 

the Quay Street premises began to be seriously overcrowded. A " New 

J f h proposals Buildings Committee" was appointed in 1865. The Committee came to 

Comm'iuee of ^ conclusion that a new building should be erected on a more suitable 

site, and recommended at the same time that the Royal Manchester 

School of Medicine should be incorporated, and the collections informally 

offered by the Natural History Society, taken over. To carry out this 

policy ,100,000 was needed. But with the cotton famine in Lancashire 

Public an appeal for funds for these purposes was impossible. It was not till 

Meeting to 

establish the February ist, 1867, that public action was taken, and at a meeting at the 

" Extension 

Fund," Town Hall, with the Mayor (Mr. Robert Neill) presiding, it was decided 

Feb. I, 1867. 

Mr Thomas to f rm a Committee to raise the amount required. Mr. Thomas Ashton 



was appointed Chairman of the Executive Committee, and Dr. John 
Dr a ';rohn' an ' Watts was appointed Secretary. Promise of Government help was sought 



of in i868 both from Mr. Disraeli and from Mr. Gladstone, in vain. But 
of the by October of that year nearly ,77,000 had been raised locally, and 

Committee. the extension fund to which the neighbouring towns of Bolton and 
Oldham contributed over .4,000 each, finally amounted to .106,706. 
While many exerted themselves strenuously, the success of the effort 
was recognized to be due to Mr. Thomas Ashton more than to any 
other one man. The present site (or rather the greater part of it, 
amounting to 19,645 square yards), bounded on three sides by Oxford 
Street, Coupland Street, and Burlington Street, was bought for a sum of 
about .29,000. Mr. Alfred Waterhouse was chosen as architect, and 
on September 23rd, 1873, the present central building (parallel to Oxford 



( 7 ) 

Street) and the chemical laboratories were declared open by the Duke 
of Devonshire. 

Meanwhile a fundamental change had taken place in the constitution Change in the 

constitution of 

of the College, by means of two successive Acts of Parliament. The the College by 

* Acts of Parlia- 

first, The Owens Extension College Act, 1870, created "The Owens ment l8 7 
Extension College," in which were vested the funds raised by the 
Extension Committee ; and the constitution of this College was laid down 
in great detail. The Act provided at the same time for the drafting of a 
scheme to be approved by the Charity Commissioners and confirmed 
by a second Act of Parliament, by which the endowments and staff of 
the original Owens College should be transferred to the Owens Exten- 
sion College. The Act thus contemplated was passed as The Owens 
College Act, 1871, the " amalgamated Colleges " receiving the original 
title of " The Owens College." By this mechanism the government of 
the Owens College passed, on September ist, 1871, from the hands of the 
Owens Trustees into the hands of (i) a Court of Governors, consisting 
of a President and 42 members, (') the supreme body, with an executive 
committee, the Council, to " manage financial and other ordinary business 
of the College," and (2) a Senate consisting of the Principal and Pro- 
fessors, to "organise and direct the education of the College." The Acts 
provided especially for the election of a President, a Treasurer, and 
a Principal as officers of the College, and for the constitution of a body 
of former students, with special privileges, called the Associates. The 
Duke of Devonshire was nominated first President of the College.( 2 ) 

(') Increased by the Owens College Act, 1899, to a maximum of 60. 

(') At the date of the reconstitution of the College, the Trustees consisted of the 
following : ALFRED NEILD, Esq. (Chairman) JOHN MARSLAND BENNETT, Esq. ; ROBERT 
DUKINFIELD DARBISHIRE, Esq. ; Rev. NICHOLAS WILLIAM GIBSON, M.A., Canon of Man- 
chester ; MURRAY GLADSTONE, Esq., F.R.A.S. ; EDWARD HARDCASTLE, Esq., M.A. ; WILLIAM 
HENRY HOULDSWORTH, Esq., M.P. ; JOHN ROBINSON, Esq. ; JOHN EDWARD TAYLOR, Esq. ; 
MATTHEW ALEXANDER EASON WILKINSON, Esq., M.D. The Senate consisted of the 



Incorporation 
of the Royal 
Manchester 
School of 
Medicine and 
Surgery with 
the College. 



The Library 
of the 
Manchester 
Medical 
Society. 



The College authorities were empowered by the Acts to admit female 
students. (') 

The two great extensions in the scope of the College recommended 
by the New Buildings Committee of 1865-7 had also been carried out 
before the building was completed. 

Early in 1872 an agreement was made with the Royal Manchester 
School of Medicine for its incorporation with the College on August ist 
of that year ; thus Mr. Turner, the founder of the school, lived to see 
his intentions of 1836 realised. Part of the medical teaching was 
carried on for a time in the old school in Faulkner Street, but a 
special building fund of about ,10,500 was raised, to which Miss Hannah 
Brackenbury contributed largely. She also provided at the same time 
,5,000 towards the endowment of a medical chair (devoted by the College 
to Physiology). The Medical School buildings (forming about one fourth 
of the present Medical School buildings) were opened in October, 1874, 
by the late Professor Huxley ( 2 ). In the same session the Manchester 
Medical Society offered to house their library of some 13,000 volumes 

Principal and Professor of Greek, J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A. ; Professor of Latin, A. S. 
WILKINS, M.A. ; Professor of English Language and Literature, and Ancient and Modern 
History, A. W. WARD, M.A. ; Professor of Mathematics, THOMAS BARKER, M.A. ; Professors 
of Natural Philosophy, BALFOUR STEWART, LL.D., F.R.S., and T. H. CORE, M.A. ; Professor 
of Engineering, OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A. ; Professor of Logic, Mental and Moral Philosophy 
and Political Economy, W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A. ; Professor of Jurisprudence and Law, 
JAMES BRYCE, D.C.L. ; Professor of Chemistry, H. E. ROSCOE, PH.D., F.R.S. ; Professor of 
Natural History, W. C. WILLIAMSON, F.R.S. ; Professor of Modern and Oriental Languages 
T. THEODORES. 

For further details of the constitution of the College, see p. 23. 

(')They were not, however, admitted until 1883. See pp. 86-7. 

0) The Medical Professors in this session were as follows : Director of Medical Studies and 
Professor of Surgery, GEORGE SOUTHAM, F.R.C.S. ; Professor of Physiology, WILLIAM 
SMITH, F.R.C.S. ; Professor of Practical Physiology and Histology, ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., 
F.R.S. ; Professor of Surgery, EDWARD LUND, F.R.C.S. ; Professors of Medicine, WILLIAM 
ROBERTS, M.D., and JOHN EDWARD MORGAN, M.A., M.D. 



( 9 ) 

in the College, and to open it to the students, the College defraying 
certain expenses connected therewith. The library now contains about 
32,000 volumes, and is especially rich in periodicals. 

In December, 1872, the fine Natural History Collections accumulated 
by the Manchester Natural History Society (founded in 1821), and by Formation 

of the 

the Manchester Geological Society (founded in 1838), and exhibited in "Manchester 

Museum, 

a building in Peter Street, (') were transferred to the College under certain l , )wens ., 

& ' v I & College," by 

conditions, the Natural History Society contributing at the same time ^""^Toi^ec 
.5,000 towards a building fund, and .14,589 as an endowment. These ?","[ 
sums cover only a portion of the heavy expenses entailed in the erection sJa'ety ami 
and maintenance of " The Manchester Museum." It was not until 1888 Society. 
that the collections were housed in the New Museum buildings facing 
Oxford Street. (See pp. 14, 121.) 

With the fulfilment of the projects of the " Extension Committee," 
there came no period of arrest in the history of the College, but a new 
and quickened movement of expansion. In 1874 the first course for 
women was delivered in the College buildings (though not as a recognised Classes for 

\\ omen. 

College class), by Professor Wilkins ; this was the .first step towards the 
formation of the "Department for Women" in 1883, and the gradual 
opening of the majority of the College classes to women later. (See pp. 86-7.) 

In the same year a chair of Geology, Palaeontology and Mining Chair of 

" Geology. 

was created, and Mr. W. Boyd Dawkins, then Curator of the Museum, 
was elected to the chair. An effort was made to create a properly 
equipped Scientific Mining School, for which Manchester, with its 
neighbouring coal mines, would be so natural a centre ; but the attempt 
failed, and has not yet been renewed. 

In the same year also a chair of Organic Chemistry, the first of its kind chair of 
in England, was created, and filled by Mr. Carl Schorlemmer, F.R.S., who chemistry. 
was previously lecturer in that subject. 

(') Now occupied by ihe Young Men's Christian Association. 



( '0 ) 

The financial strain on the College, due to naturally increased working 
The cafton expenses, soon became serious. It was relieved by two great bequests ; 

and Beyer 

bequests. firstly, a bequest from Mr. Charles Clifton, of Jersey, U.S.A., for the Engi- 
neering department, amounting to over .21,500, received in 1875-6; and, 
secondly, a bequest from Mr. Charles Frederick Beyer (of the firm of Beyer, 
Peacock and Co.), amounting to ,100,243, received 1876-87, a larger sum 
than the original endowment. This was destined for the endowment of 
professorships in science, one, at least, of which was to be a professorship of 
Engineering. 

The creation It was in 1875 tnat tne idea of transforming the College into an 

of the Victoria ... 

University. independent University, with power to grant degrees, was brought before 
the Council in a pamphlet signed by four members of the Senate : the 
Principal (Dr. Greenwood), and Professors Roscoe, Ward, and Morgan. " It 
is to the zeal and untiring devotion " of the authors of this pamphlet, says 
Mr. Thompson, "that Manchester owes its University; others cordially 
supported the movement, but they, through five weary years, placed their 
case before the public, removed prejudices, advanced arguments, and lived 
down opposition." (') The idea of the College Professors was not carried out 
in its original form. In July 1877 a memorial, praying for the grant of a 
charter, converting the Owens College into the University of Manchester, 
was sent to the Privy Council ; this was quickly followed by many memorials 
in support from the Manchester Corporation and from corporations and local 
institutions throughout the county. A second memorial from the College, 
suggesting a somewhat enlarged body of Governors was presented later in 
the year. But in May 1878 the authorities of the Yorkshire College, Leeds, 
sent up a memorial to the Privy Council in opposition to the project, praying 
that Her Majesty, if pleased to create a new University, should be advised 
" (i ) not to grant the Charter to the Owens College, Manchester, but to a new 
corporation with powers to incorporate the Owens College, and such other 
institutions as may now or hereafter be able to fulfil the conditions of incor- 

(') Loc. cit., p. 520. 




CHARLES FREDERICK BEYER. 

(From a painting !>y the Chevalier Schttritf.) 



P/toto by Garside &* Co., Manchester. 



( 11 ) 

poration laid down in the Charter ; (2) not to confer upon the said University 
the name of a town or of any person whose claims to such distinction are 
purely local." The action of Leeds proved effective, and the authorities of 
the two colleges met at Devonshire House, under the chairmanship of the 
Duke of Devonshire, and eventually came to a compromise on most points. 
It was decided to petition (i) that the seat of the new University should be 
in Manchester and that it should be named " The Victoria University," after 
Her Majesty ; (2) that the first College of the University should be the 
Owens College, but that arrangements should be made for the admission of 
other colleges satisfactorily equipped, and that these colleges should have a 
share in the government of the University proportionate to their magnitude 
and efficiency ; (3) that degrees should only be conferred on students pre- 
pared by an academic training in the Colleges of the University, and that 
the Colleges should have a legitimate share in determining the curricula of 
study and conducting University examinations. (') 

From the educational point of view this last proviso was the most 
important ; the insistence on academic training, and on the union of 
teaching and examining functions essentially distinguished the new 
University from the London University, with which Owens College had 
been previously associated. A charter embodying these principles was 
drafted by Professor Alfred Hopkinson (now Principal of the Owens 
College) and ratified, in all its provisions save one, on April 2Oth, 1880. 
The power to grant medical degrees, withheld at first, was conferred on 
the Victoria University by a supplemental charter, dated March 2Oth, 
1883. University College, Liverpool, founded in 1881, and the Yorkshire 
College, Leeds, founded in 1874, were associated with the Owens College 
as constituent Colleges of the University on November 5th, 1884, and 
November 3rd, 1887, respectively. 

By its charter the University admits women to all its degrees. 

(*) Thompson, loc. cit., pp. 533-7. 



The mn<uence f the Victoria University on the Owens College, as 
on its other Colle f es ' has been considerable. By its constitution 
College. (Charter, ch. IV., 2) the University is obliged to lay down courses of 
study for candidates for degrees. These degrees in Arts and Science 
are of two kinds, (i) Ordinary degrees, with a wider range of subjects; 
and (2) Honours degrees, for more specialised studies.(') The policy of 
the University has hitherto been, in the first place, to lay down all 
degree courses in great detail (although with certain options) ; in the 
second, to increase the number of its Honours Schools. 

To be effective, the creation of each Honours School required on the 
part of the Colleges previous or simultaneous provision of specialised 
teaching. This requirement could only be met, in several departments, by 
an increase, both in the work of the staff and of its numbers, over and 
above that required by the normal augmentation in the number of the 
students. For the student the more exacting schemes of study have 
increased the number of hours of obligatory attendance ; but in the 
Honours Schools, wherever it is possible, he is put on the, road to original 
research during his final year, and this compensates, perhaps, for the 
loss of freedom in the early part of his course. 

If the influence of the University on its Colleges, through its power 
to lay down degree courses and in other ways, is constantly felt, the 
converse is also true ; for each great independent development on the 
part of any one of the Colleges leads at once to a widening of the 
scope of the University ; and the University transmits the stimulus to 
the other constituent Colleges, and thus makes strongly for the general 
progress of its three units. 



(') In the Faculties of Medicine, Law, and Music the studies are essentially of a 
special kind, so that special Honours Schools in these subjects are unnecessary. (See 
also pp. 40-42). 



( '3 ) 

To return to the detailed history of the College. In 1876 the 
Friends' Hall (now called Dalton Hall), the first hall of residence con- 
nected with the College, was opened (see p. 129). This was followed by 
the opening of the Hulme Hall in 1886 (see p. 129), and of the Hall of 
Residence for Women in 1899 (see p. 130). The halls of residence fulfil 
an extremely important function in providing for a considerable number 
of students whose homes are in distant parts of England or in the colonies. 

In 1881 the College received one of its most fruitful benefactions in Foundation of 

the Bishop 

the foundation by an anonymous donor of the Bishop Berkeley Fellowships, ^if 6 ' 6 ? . 
These fellowships of .100 each, tenable for two years, were to be awarded 
without examination to candidates capable of undertaking original work in 
any department of literature or philosophy, or of the historical, physical, or 
natural sciences. The fellowships were continued from year to year till 
1895 ('). They were entirely open, and a large number were awarded to 
candidates who had not received their training in the College. They were 
supplemented in 1889 by the institution of unpaid research fellowships and 
studentships ( 2 ). It is much to be hoped that they may be replaced by a 
similar foundation. 

In January, 1882, the Hulme Trustees, under a scheme approved by the Annual r,r.t 

from the 

Charity Commissioners, agreed to pay to the College a sum of ,1,000 Hulme 

Trustees. 

annually towards the professorships of Greek, of Latin, and of History 
and English Literature ( 3 ) on condition that the College should award 
certain exhibitions (since replaced by scholarships) in these subjects. 

In 1880 the chair of Natural History, from which Geology had been Erection of 
previously separated, was still further subdivided, and Dr. Arthur Milnes Laboratories 

for Natural 

Marshall was appointed to the new chair of Zoology. It was largely owine History, and 

} . of the Museum 

to Professor Marshall's influence and activity that the next great extension Kuiidi 
of the College took place in the Department of Natural History. At the 

(') See p. 134. () See p. 137. 

( 3 ) In 1888 the subject of the chair was restricted to History, and an independent lecture- 
ship in English Literature was instituted, which is without endowment. 

E 



( 14 ) 

time of his election, the practical work in Zoology and Botany was carried 
on in the Physiological Laboratory ; the biological specimens of the Museum 
(see p. 9) were stored away and invisible. On November 29th, 1882, a 
public meeting was held in the Town Hall to launch a subscription for new 
buildings for Natural H istory laboratories and the Manchester Museum. In 
August, 1883, the extensions were begun ; they included the north side of 
the quadrangle and half the frontage to Oxford Street, as far as and includ- 
ing the tower. The buildings (called the Beyer Buildings, in honour of 
Mr. C. F. Beyer) were completed, and the laboratories came into use, in 
1887. Their total cost amounted to about .82,000, towards which 
.40,587 were raised by subscription, and the Whitworth Legatees (') contri- 
buted ,27,500. 



In 1883 a new wing of the Medical School was opened, and its 
scope was enlarged also by the institution of a Pharmaceutical Department. 
In 1884 a Dental Department, which has proved very successful, was 
added, and in 1888 a Department of Public Health. 

In January, 1887, Sir Joseph Whitworth, Bart., the great engineer, 
died, leaving the residue of his estate to Lady Whitworth, (") Mr. Richard 
Copley Christie and Mr. Robert Dukinfield Darbishire, to be disposed 
of at their absolute discretion, for such purposes as they might think fit. 
Sir Joseph Whitworth, for many years a Life Governor, had taken a keen 
interest in the College during his lifetime, and had given it very 
material support. In recognition of this fact the Residuary Legatees 
have presented to the College a noble series of gifts. The first, in 1887, 

(') See below. 

(*) Lady Whitworth died in 1896. Her devisees are Mr. E. Tootal Broadhurst, and 
Mr. J. B. Close Brooks. 

For the sake of brevity the Residuary Legatees of Sir Joseph Whitworth are alluded 
to hereafter as "the Whitworth Legatees." The term also includes the devisees of Lady 
Whitworth. 




SIR JOSEPH WH1TWORTH. BART.. F.R.S. 



/ ,Y/,.,Y.'- /->J'. /..' 



. H'. f~ S. Ltd. 



( '5 ) 

was a donation covering the cost of an Engineering Laboratory, one of 
the first of its kind, which had just been erected. The Laboratory is 
called the " Whitworth Laboratory." Towards the expense of the The 

Whitworth 

experimental engines, specially designed by Professor Osborne Reynolds, Engineering 
F.R.S., Messrs. Mather and Platt contributed largely. 

In May, 1887, Mr. Alfred Neild, elected a Trustee in 1858, Chairman Resignation! 

' of Mr. Alfred 

of the Trustees in 1864, and Treasurer and Chairman of the Council under Neiidndoi 

Dr. Green- 

the new scheme in 1871, resigned his post. Two and a-half years later, wood - 
in November, 1889, Dr. Greenwood resigned the Principalship, which he 
had held since 1857. The impulse towards expansion during the previous 
thirty years had come from different quarters ; but it was only by a wise 
and skilful central administration that the success of these varied move- 
ments could be ensured and the unity of the College maintained. In so 
great and complex an undertaking, it is impossible to determine the 
exact share of each man, but the services of Mr. Neild and of Dr. Green- 
wood in the two chief administrative posts of the College were 
conspicuous. To his gifts as an administrator Dr. Greenwood added 
those of a teacher, and his memory is cherished by all who came under 
his personal influence. Mr. Alderman Joseph Thompson succeeded Appointments 

of Mr. Joseph 

Mr. Neild as Treasurer and Chairman of the Council; and Dr. Adolphus Thompson as 

Treasurer, and 

William Ward, who had held a professorship in the College since 1866, ^ f ^ n w ^, d 
was appointed Principal in December, 1889. 

In 1889, Parliament, recognising at once that the University Colleges, Government 
like the older Universities, were national as well as local institutions, and 
that they possessed insufficient endowments to carry out their work with the 
utmost effectiveness, voted a sum of ,15,000 a year to eleven such colleges 
in England and Scotland. It was expressly stated that the object of the 
grant was to "supplement and encourage local effort," not to replace it ('). 
The total grant to each college was determined by two factors the number 

(') Memorandum of a Committee appointed by the Treasury, quoted in a Treasury 
minute of March nth, 1889. See also a Treasury minute of July ist, 1889. 



( '6 ) 

of its departments, and the total amount of local subscriptions and students' 
fees taken together. The grant to the Owens College was fixed at i ,800. 
A Parliamentary Committee in 1892 recognised the inadequacy of the grant, 
and proposed that it should be doubled, but the recommendation was not 
carried out. In 1896, however, three Commissioners (') were appointed by 
the Treasury to report on the state of the colleges, and the total grant was 
increased to .25,000. The Chancellor of the Exchequer had fixed .3,000 
as the maximum annual sum to be allotted to any one college, but on the 
recommendation of the Commissioners an exceptional grant of ,3,500 was 
made to the Owens College " in recognition of its pre-eminence." 

The first Government grant, which formed a new feature in the finance 
of the College, was followed by other annual grants from public bodies. 
Grant from In 1891 the Manchester City Council, under the Technical Instruction 

tllfl 

Manchester Acts of 1 889 and 1890, applied a sum of .1,000 to scholarships tenable 

City Council. 

at the College, and has continued to do so from year to year. At the same 
time a grant of i ,000 was voted to the College itself, towards the expenses 
of technical instruction. This grant was reduced in 1895 to .900, in 1896 
to ,800, in 1897 to -7 a Y ear . although the numbers in the departments 
qualifying students to become managers of works, and the number of 
students actually studying for technical careers, have increased. 

Neither Salford nor the other neighbouring boroughs have con- 
tributed hitherto to the College from the funds at their disposal. 
c. ram from In 1894-5 tne Lancashire County Council voted a grant of .400 a 

the Lancashire . 

County year to the College; this grant was reduced in 1895-6 to .250, but in the 

Council. 

present year it has been increased to .500, of which .250 is allocated to 
the scheme for Higher Commercial Education. 
i*athofthe In 189 1 the Duke of Devonshire, who had been President of the 

President of 

ihe College. College since 1871, died. His son, the present Duke, accepted the 

Election of his 

successor. vacant office in 1892. 

(') Mr. T. H. Warren, President of Magdalen College, Oxford, Mr. G. D. Liveing, F.R.S., 
Professor of Chemistry at Cambridge, and Mr. R. Chalmers, of the Treasury. 



( '7 ) 
Since its incorporation with the College the Medical School had Development 

of the Medical 

steadily grown in numbers, and further provision both of teachers and School. 
of accommodation became necessary. 

In 1890 the chair of Pathology was endowed by the Legatees of the Foundation of 
late Mr. Daniel Procter with a sum of .6,000, recent developments in Cha " oi 

Pathology. 

pathological science, and especially in bacteriology, having rendered an 
extension of the department essential ('). 

In the same year the Whitworth Legatees purchased the Stanley Grove Gift of 

the " College 

Estate, containing about 12* acres, with certain large houses on it, for Hospital 

Estate " by the 

.29,700 and presented it to the College " for Hospital Service." The 
entrance gate bears the inscription " Hospital Gardens, given to Owens 
College in memory of the late Sir Joseph Whitworth, Bart." The only 
condition laid down with regard to the hospital or hospitals to be established 
on the estate was that they should afford " the College such service as it 
may require in aid of its professional courses." Negotiations with the 
Board of the Royal Infirmary for the establishment of a hospital on the 
College estate were carried on for some time, but could not at the time be 
brought to a successful issue. In November, 1892, one of the houses on 
the estate was opened as " The Cancer Pavilion and Home " (see p. 116). 

In February, 1894, a special arrangement was made with the Royal 
Infirmary by which a certain number of beds were allotted permanently to 
the occupants of the chairs of Medicine and Surgery in the College. 

In November, 1894, a further important extension of the Medical Extension of 

the Medical 

School along Coupland Street, begun in 1891, and nearly doubling the School 

Buildings. 

accommodation provided, was opened. A sum of .23,000 was raised by 
subscription, but a heavy debt on this account still remains. 

To the scheme for the establishment of a Training College for Elemen- Establishment 
tary Teachers advocated by Mr. Morell in 1858 (see p. 5) the objections Training 

College. 

then raised had long since disappeared, and in May, 1890, the College 
Council applied to the Education Department for authorization to establish 

(') See pp. 101-105. 



Establishment 
of a 

Department 
of Education. 



Relations of 
the College 
with local 
Theological 
Colleges. 



Gift from Her 
Majesty the 
Queen. 



The Christie 
Library. 



The 

Whitworth 
Hall. 



a " Day Training College " in connection with the Owens College. The 
application was granted, and the new department was opened in October, 
1891, for male students only. It proved successful, and in October, 1892, 
a branch for female students was added. So far the College provided only 
for the training of teachers for elementary schools ; but the creation by the 
University of Diplomas for Teachers in Secondary Schools in 1894 led 
to the institution of special courses under the Professor of Philosophy and 
the Master and Mistress of Method, and in 1900 to the formation of a 
special Department of Education under the direction of a Professor. It is 
hoped that the new department will develop rapidly within the next few 
years. 

Although no theological studies are carried on in the College, a 
number of theological students attend for instruction in Arts Subjects 
(including Church History). From 1851 down to the present time (except 
during the years 1856-67) the students of the Lancashire Independent 
College have received the whole of their secular training at the Owens 
College ; the Unitarian Home Missionary College has adopted the same 
plan ; and the Schola Episcopi, the Moravian College, Fairfield, and the 
Baptist College, Brighton Grove, also send students to the Arts side of the 
College. With all these institutions inter-collegiate relations are cordial. 

In March, 1893, Her Majesty the Queen presented the College with a 
sum of ; 2,000, derived from certain funds belonging to the Duchy of 
Lancaster. The donation was appropriated to the Department for Women, 
and added to subsequently by a number of subscriptions. 

In October, 1893, Mr Richard Copley Christie offered to present the 
College with a new Library building. The " Christie Library " erected 
from plans by Messrs. Waterhouse and Sons at a cost of about ,22,000, 
was opened on June 22nd, 1898, by the Duke of Devonshire. On the same 
day the stone was laid of the " Whitworth Hall." The need for a large 
hall to be used for public functions and for examination purposes had long 
been urgent. In October, 1897, ^ r - Christie offered the College the third at 



( '9 ) 

his disposal of the balance of Sir Joseph Whitworth's bequest, amounting 
to not less than ,50,000, for the purpose of erecting a hall and completing 
the College building. It is expected that the hall will be opened in 1901. 

In 1895 tne l ate Mr. Henry Simon presented a sum of ,5,000 to the 
College towards the endowment of a professorship of German language and 
Literature. 

In 1806 an arrangement was made between the authorities of the Arrangement 

with the 

College and of the Manchester Municipal Technical School for the due Manchester 

Municipal 

correlation of the work of the two institutions, in order, as far as Technical 
possible, to prevent overlapping. Each institution is represented on the 
governing body of the other. 

At the end of 1897 Dr. Ward, who had held the Principalship since Resignation 
the end of 1889, resigned. Of the progress of the College and the new 
movements that were originated during his tenure of office the facts set 
down here speak sufficiently ; it will be for a later historian to put 
adequately on record Dr. Ward's immense personal services to the 
institution. 

Dr. Ward was succeeded in the Principalship by a former student and Appointment 

of Mr. Alfred 

Associate of the College, Mr. Alfred Hopkinson, Q.C., M.P., who had Hopkinson as 

Principal. 

already occupied the chair of Law from 1875 to 1890. 

In 1897 two anonymous donations of ,10,000 and ,5,000 were Erection of 

New Physical 

received towards the cost and maintenance respectively of new Physical Laboratories. 

Laboratories, which had become a necessity. Other contributions have 

been received, among them a memorial gift from the relatives of the 

late Dr. John Hopkinson, F.R.S., formerly a student of the College, for 

the establishment of the electro-technical laboratory ; and the buildings are 

now completed. (') 

During the last session a scheme has been drawn up, with the Scheme of 

Higher 



assistance of other bodies, for the provision of Higher Commercial 

(') See p. 56. 



( 20 ) 

Education in the College on lines similar to those of recently created 
Continental institutions (see p. 88). 

conclusion. The rise of the Owens College and of the sister University Colleges 

in the provinces marks a new movement in English national life. 

At the beginning of the century Oxford and Cambridge were the 
only Universities in England. Their doors were closed, or all but closed, 
to dissenters. In 1828, the University of London, which, in 1836, 
abandoned its title to a new institution ('), and was then called Univer- 
sity College, London, was founded by a group of Liberals of culture, 
Campbell the poet, Brougham, and Isaac Lyon Goldsmid at their head, 
for those who could not accept the tests imposed by Oxford and 
Cambridge. 

King's College, London, was founded in 1829, and modelled on the 
same educational lines as University College, by the party that desired 
to maintain the tests. 

In certain respects these two Colleges must be regarded as the 
prototypes of all English University Colleges. They brought University- 
education for the first time within the grasp of men who could not 
afford the expensive living of the older foundations. 

But just as the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge were, and still 
are, out of relation with the towns in which they are placed, so the new 
Whig College and the new Tory College were without any kind of relation 
to the communal life of the metropolis, if indeed such communal life 
could be said to exist. In Manchester the case was different ; for if the 
Owens College, like University College, owes its origin in part to the 
liberal views of its founder in matters of religion, yet the whole previous 
history of higher education in Manchester, the co-operation of George 
Faulkner, the Churchman and Tory, in its establishment, and the help 

(') From 1836 down to the present time, the University of London has been only an 
examining and not a teaching University. It is now being re-constituted as a teaching 
University. 



given by all parties in maintaining and enlarging its existence, shew 
clearly that Owens, unlike the London Colleges, is really the creation 
of a city, conscious, like the mediaeval cities of Italy, of its own 
individuality, and desiring University teaching and University work of 
the highest kind to form part of the city life. (') The Owens College 
created a new type. Eight other University Colleges have since been 
established in as many large towns of England and Scotland. ( 2 ) Each 
College forms an integral part of a great commercial and industrial 
community, to whose needs it must ever respond, on whose support its 
future must eventually depend. The record of work done in the Owens 
College, Manchester, and its whole history during the past fifty years, 
prove amply that the conditions of its existence have limited neither 
its achievement nor its aims. 

(') This civic feeling has been strikingly illustrated by the recent creation of the splendid 
John Rylands Library, in memory of a Manchester merchant, by his widow. 

(") The Durham College of Science, Newcastle-on.Tyne, in 1871 ; the Yorkshire College, 
Leeds, in 1874 ; Mason University College, Birmingham (originally called the Mason Science 
College) in 1875, now merged into the new University of Birmingham; University College, 
Bristol, in 1876; University College, Sheffield (originally called Firth College), in 1879; 
University College, Dundee (founded expressly on the model of the Owens College), in i88o> 
University College, Liverpool, in 1881 ; University College, Nottingham, in 1881. 

The Colleges recognised by Government as " University Colleges " also include Bedford 
College for Women, London, founded in 1849 ; and the three Welsh University Colleges formed 
at Aberystwyth in 1872, at Bangor in 1883, and at Cardiff in 1883, now united in the federal 
University of Wales. 



APPENDIX.-THE NUMBER OF STUDENTS AT THE OWENS 
COLLEGE IN SUCCESSIVE SESSIONS, 1851-2 TO 1899-1900. (') 



Session. 


Arts, Science, and Law Department. 
Men. Women. 


Medical 
Department. 


Totals. 


1851-52 . 


62 








62 


1852-53 


71 








71 


'853-54 


7 








71 


I8S4-5S 


58 








58 


1855-56 . 


52 








52 


1856-57 


33 








33 


1857-58 . 


34 








34 


1858-59 . 


40 








40 


1859-60 


57 








57 


1860-61 


69 








69 


1861-62 


88 








88 


1862-63 


1 08 








1 08 


1863-64 


no 








no 


1864-65 


128 








128 


1865-66 


"3 








"3 


1866-67 


"3 








"3 


1867-68 


i?3 








173 


1868-69 


2IO 








2IO 


1869-70 


2O9 








209 


1870-71 


264 








264 


1871-72 . 


327 








327 


1872-73 . 


337 





134 


471 


i873-74 


356 





139 


495 


i874-75 


375 





143 


5i8 


1875-76 . 


395 





150 


545 


1876-77 . 


415 





154 


5 6 9 


1877-78 . 


418 


- 


162 


580 


1878-79 . 


443 





1 86 


629 


1879-80 


392 





220 


612 


i 880-81 


417 





216 


633 


1881-82 


39 





254 


644 


1882-83 


373 





246 


619 


1883-84 


400 


60 


276 


736 


1884-85 


393 


5 


276 


719 


1885-86 


380 


66 


299 


745 


1886-87 


3 6 4 


67 


283 


7M 


1887-88 , 


389 


74 


310 


773 


1888-89 


45 


68 


328 


80 1 


i 889-90 


410 


72 


329 


811 


1890-91 


429 


61 


321 


811 


1891-92 


477 


81 


382 


940 


1892-93 . 


507 


93 


345 


945 


1893-94 


527 


1 08 


33 


965 


1894-95 


484 


1 08 


346 


938 


1895-96 


566 


104 


322 


992 


1896-97 


524 


IO2 


338 


964 


1897-98 


546 


99 


34i 


986 


i 898-99 


528 


in 


355 


994 


1899-1900 . 


507 


126 


369 


1,002 



(') Evening Class Students are not included. 



'3 ) 

IL-Government and Administration* 

By the Acts of Parliament of 1870 and 1871 (see p. 7) the constitution 
government of the College was vested in an official head called the College. 
President, and the three following bodies, namely : 
(i.) The Court of Governors, 
(ii.) The Council. 

(iii.) The Senate, with a Principal who acts as Chairman. 
The President is elected by the Court for a period of five years, The 

, . i- -i i President 

and is re-eligible. 

The Court is the supreme governing body.(') It meets as a rule twice Constitution 

and Functions 

a year. The Council is the executive Committee of the Court ; its of the court 

and Council. 

functions are " to manage the financial and other ordinary business of the 
College and to prepare questions for the decision of the Court." The 
Council consists of the President, the Treasurer, the Principal, the three 
Professors who are members of the Court, and ten other Governors, elected 

(') The Court originally consisted of the following : The President ; 24 Life-Governors either 
nominated in the Act or co-opted; 15 Governors holding office for five years, and 
nominated by certain persons or public bodies ; the Principal of the College ; and two 
Professors nominated by the Senate and holding office for two years. 

Vacancies among the Life-Governors were filled up until the passing of the Act of 
1 899 by the election of new Life-Governors by the remaining members of the Court. 
Under the new Act Governors elected by the Court to fill such vacancies hold office for 
five years and are eligible for reappointment. The number of Governors has been raised 
from 42 to a maximum possible number of 60. The total number at present is 52. 

As at present constituted, the Court consists of the following : 
(i.) The President of the College, 
(ii.) 20 Life-Governors, 
(iii.) 28 Governors holding office for five years of whom 

(A) 8 have been elected by the Court. 

(B) 4 are nominated by the President of the College. 

(c) 2 are nominated by the Council of the City of Manchester, i by the Council of 
the Borough of Salford, and 2 by the Lancashire County Council. 



by the Court.(') It meets, as a rule, twice monthly during the session. 
The Council, in addition to its other functions elects the Principal and the 
Professors. 
Constitution The Senate consists of the Principal and the Professors of the College. 

and Functions 

of the Senate. Its functions are " to organize and direct the education of the College and 
superintend its discipline." The Senate meets, as a rule, monthly during 
the session. In addition to its other functions, the Senate appoints 
Assistant Lecturers. 

The Principal advises students in the Department of Arts, Science, 
and Law with regard to their studies, and administers the ordinary 
discipline of the College.( 2 ) He is assisted in these functions by the 
College Tutor. 

Details of the business administration of the College are under the 
control of the Registrar, who is assisted by a Cashier and clerks. 

The present Court, Council, Senate, and other officers of the College 
are as follows : 

THE COURT OF GOVERNORS, 
prestoent of tbe College: 

His GRACE THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE, K.G., LL.D. 

treasurer of tbe College ano Cbairman of tbe Council. 

Alderman JOSEPH THOMPSON. 

principal of tbe College. 

ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B.C.L. 

(D) 3 are nominated by the Court from among Members of Parliament for the 

counties and boroughs of Lancashire, Cheshire, Yorkshire, and Derbyshire. 

(E) 4 are nominated by the Lord President of the Council or by any other member 

of Her Majesty's Government who may be discharging the functions of 
Minister of Education. 

(F) 4 are nominated by the Associates of the College (see p. 153). 
(iv.) The Principal of the College, ex-offido. 

(v.) 3 Professors holding office for two years and elected by the Senate. 
(') Under the recent Act the total number of members of the Council may be increased 

from 1 6 to 18. 
(') Students in Medicine are advised by the Dean of the Medical School. 



Xlfe Governors: 

The Right Hon. EARL EGERTON OF TATTON. 

GEORGE WILLIAM AGNEW, M.A. 

THOMAS GAIR ASHTON, M.P. 

EDWARD BF.HRENS. 

EDWARD JOHN BROADFIELD, B.A. 

E. TOOTAL BROADHURST. 

JOHN FREDERICK CHEETHAM, B.A. 

NEVILLE CLEGG. 

EDWARD DONNER, B.A. 

ALFRED HA WORTH, B.A. 

JOHN E. KING, M.A. 

IVAN LEVINSTEIN. 

WILLIAM MATHER, M.P. 

ALFRED NEILD. 

W. MORTON PHILIPS, B.A. 

Alderman HARRY RAWSON. 

C. P. SCOTT, M.A., M.P. 

Alderman JOSEPH THOMPSON, Treasurer and Chairman of the Council. 

A. W. WARD, Litt.D., LL.D. 

HENRY WILDE, D.Sc., F.R.S. 

Governors nominates for jfive HJears: 

By the Court. 

Sir FRANK FORBES ADAM, C.I.E. 
RICHARD COPLEY CHRISTIE, M.A., LL.D. 
WILLIAM JOHN CROSSLEY. 
Sir WILLIAM H. HOULDSWORTH, Bart., M.P. 
Rev. ALEXANDER MCLAREN, D.D., B.A. 
LUDWIG MONO, Ph.D., F.R.S. 
EDWARD PARTINGTON. 
H. E. SCHUNCK, D.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S. 

By the President. 

The Right Hon. the EARL OF DERBY, K.G. 

The Right Hon. Sir UGHTRED J. KAY-SHUTTLEWORTH, Bart., M.P. 
JOHN P. THOMASSON. 
Rev. CALEB SCOTT, D.D., B.A., LL.B. 

By the Council of the City of Manchester. 
Alderman JOHN KING, Jun. 
Alderman JOHN HOPKINSON. 



By the Council of the Borough of Salford. 
Alderman FRANCIS HARRISON WALMSLEY. 

By the Lancashire County Council. 

The Right Hon. Sir J. T. HIBBERT, K.C.B. (Chairman of the County Council.). 
Alderman THOMAS SNAPE (Chairman of the Technical Instruction Committee of the 
County Council). 

By the Court from among the Members of Parliament for the Counties and Boroughs of 

Lancashire, Cheshire, Yorkshire, and Derbyshire. 
The Most Hon. the MARQUIS OF LORNE, K.T., M.P.(') 
VICTOR CAVENDISH, M.P. 
JAMES KEN YON, M.P. 

By the Lord President of the Privy Council : 
The Right Hon. the EARL OF CREWE. 

The Very Rev. the DEAN OF MANCHESTER (E. C. MACLURE, D.D.). 
J. COSMO MELVILL, M.A. 
Sir HENRY ENFIELD ROSCOE, LL.D., D.C.L., F.R.S. 

By the Associates of the College : 
Professor D. J. LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P. 
EDWARD HOPKINSON, D.Sc. 
WILLIAM THORBURN, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.S. 

A. H. WORTHINGTON, B.A. 

Governors ES fficto: 

Representatives of the Senate in the Council elected for 2 years. 
Professor THOMAS JONES, M.B., F.R.C.S. 
Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S. 
Professor T. N. TOLLER, M.A. 

THE COUNCIL. 

(Ex-offido.) 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE. 
THE TREASURER (Chairman). 
THE PRINCIPAL. 

Elected for a Period of 2 years : 
EDWARD J. BROADFIELD, B.A. 
J. F. CHEETHAM, B.A. 
NEVILLE CLEGG. 
EDWARD DONNER, B.A 
ALFRED HAWORTH, B.A. 
Professor THOMAS JONES, M.B., F.R.C.S. 
IVAN LEVINSTEIN. 
WILLIAM MATHER, M.P. 

(') This Governorship has recently been vacated through the succession of the Marquis of Lome to the 
Dukedom of Argyll. 



J. COSMO MELVILL, M.A. 

ALFRED NEILD. 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S. 

Professor T. N. TOLLER, M.A. 

A. H. WORTHINGTON, B.A. 

THE SENATE. 

Appointed 1898. Professor ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B.C.L., Principal (Late 
Stowell Fellow of University College, Oxford). 

1868. Professor OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. (Hon. and late Fellow 

of Queens' College, Camb.). 

1869. Professor A. S. WILKINS, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. (Fellow of University 

College, Lond.). 

1870. Professor THOMAS H. CORE, M.A. 

1874. Professor W. BOYD DAWKINS, M.A., F.R.S. (Hon. Fellow of Jesus College, 
Oxford). 

1880. Professor T. NORTHCOTE TOLLER, M.A. (late Fellow of Christ's College, 

Camb.). 

1881. Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S. 
1881. Professor JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., F.R.C.P. 
1881. Professor D. J. LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P. 
1885. Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

1885. Professor J. STRACHAN, M.A., LL.D. (late Fellow of Pembroke College, 
Camb.). 

1885. Professor HORACE LAMB, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. (late Fellow of Trinity 

College, Camb.). 

1886. Professor WILLIAM STIRLING, M.D., D.Sc. 

1886. Professor HAROLD B. DIXON, M.A., F.R.S. (late Fellow of Balliol College, 
Oxford). 

1888. Professor W. JAPP SINCLAIR, M.A., M.D., M.R.C.P. 

1890. Professor T. F. TOUT, M.A. (late Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford). 

1891. Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE, M.B., B.Sc. 

1892. Professor F. E. WEISS, B.Sc. (Fellow of University College, Lond.). 
1892. Professor W. A. COPINGER, LL.D. 

1892. Professor J. DIXON MANN, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

1892. Professor J. S. SEATON, M.A., B.C.L. 

1892. Professor W. H. PERKIN, Junr., Ph.D., F.R.S. 

1892. Professor THOMAS JONES, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

1892. Professor WALTER WHITEHEAD, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S.E. 

1893. Professor SAMUEL ALEXANDER, M.A. (late Fellow of Lincoln College, 

Oxford). 

1894. Professor SYDNEY J. HICKSON, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S. (Hon. Fellow of 

Downing College, Camb.). 

1895. Professor VICTOR KASTNER, B. es L. 



Appointed 1895. Professor ARWID JOHANNSON, M.A. 

1898. Professor A. W. FLUX, M.A. (late Fellow of St. John's College, Camb.). 

1899. Professor H. L. WITHERS, M.A. 

Secretary to tbe Council anb Senate, anb College TTutor : 

1895. EDWARD FIDDES, M.A.(') 

IReglstrar : 

1895. SYDNEY CHAFFERS. 

FORMER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS OF THE 

COLLEGER) 

FORMER CHAIRMEN OF THE OWENS TRUSTEES. 
Appointed 1845. GEORGE FAULKNER ; deceased 1862. 
1862. WILLIAM NEILD; deceased 1864. 

1864. ALFRED NEILD; appointed Treasurer and Chairman of the 
Council, 1871. 

FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE. 

1871. WILLIAM CAVENDISH, K.G., ?th DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE; 
deceased 1891. 

FORMER TREASURER OF THE COLLEGE AND CHAIRMAN OF 

THE COUNCIL. 
1871. ALFRED NEILD; resigned 1887. 

FORMER PRINCIPALS. 
1851. A. J. SCOTT, M.A. ; resigned 1857. 
1857. J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1889. 
1889. A. W. WARD, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. ; resigned 1897. 

FORMER REGISTRARS. 

1851. J. P. ASTON ( 3 ) ; resigned 1867, and appointed Honorary 
Secretary. 

1853. J. HOLME NICHOLSON, M.A.('); resigned 1884. 
1884. H. W. HOLDER, M.A. ; appointed Bursar 1895. 

FORMER BURSAR. 
1895. H. W. HOLDER, M.A. ; resigned 1899. 

(' ) Mr. Fiddes was elected College Tutor in 1900. 

(-) A list of the Owens Trustees from the foundation to the reconstitution of the College in 1870, and of the 
Governors from that date down to 1886 is given in Mr. Thompson's The Owens College. 
(*) Mr. Aston's title was Secretary to the Owens Trustees. 
( 4 ) Mr. Nicholson's original title was " Clerk and Librarian " ; he was appointed Registrar in 1867. 



IIL-Finance* 



The Tables I. and II., given below (pp. 32-34), present Contents of 

Tables I. 

(1) the financial state of the College from its reconstitution in 

1871-2 down to the half-year ending January 3ist, 1900; and 

(2) the income and expenditure for the Session 1898-9. 

The capital of the College, amounting to .866,000, and of which Capital of 

the College. 

.418,000 is sunk in land, buildings, appliances, etc., is due almost entirely to 
private benefactions. Besides the John Owens Fund, and the Beyer 
Fund, of which details are given in the table (see also pp. 3 and 10), 
the most important increases in the capital are due to the Extension 
Fund raised by public subscription in the years 1868-1874, amounting in 
the aggregate to ,106,706, and to the donations of the Residuary 
Legatees of Sir Joseph Whitworth, Bart., given jointly or severally, and 
amounting in the aggregate to about ,120,000. (') 

It is impossible for want of space to mention the names of all Record of 

Benefactions. 

the many benefactors of the College. An indexed record of all bene- 
factions to the College has recently been drawn up by the Registrar 
of the College, and is placed for reference in the Christie Library. A 
certain number of special benefactions have been already mentioned in 
pp. 1-21, and others are mentioned under the heads of the separate 
Departments. 



(') This sum does not include the purchase money of the College Hospital Estate presented 
by the Whitworth Legatees, and amounting to ^29,381. 

G 



Indebtedness 
of the 
College. 



is indebted to the amount of 



The College at the present time 
.43,229, which is made up as follows : 

Debt on the Medical School Extension of 1894 
Debt on the purchase of land and buildings for the 

Women's Department (The Queen's Buildings) . 
Estimated deficiency on the cost of the new Physical 

Laboratory (1899-1900) .... 
Total adverse balance on the General Fund Income 

Account (accumulated since 1881) 



,22,202 



2,580 



8,000 



10,447 



,43.229 



Annual The income and expenditure for the year 1898-9, given in Table II. 

Income and r i i 

Expenditure, below, may be taken as fairly typical. 

It will be seen that of the total income of .39,084, .16,993 or 
43'5 P er cen t- was derived from students' fees, .12,736 or 32*6 per 
cent, from special endowments (including .890 from the Hulme Trust), 
,4,550 or 1 1 '6 per cent, from grants from Government and other public 
bodies, ^1,500 or 3-8 per cent, from the Temporary Special Income 
Fund, .2,038 or 5-2 per cent, from the Museum Fund (for which see 
p. 124), and ,1,267 or 3*2 per cent, from various sources. 

Of the total expenditure, amounting to ,40,244, .22,643 or 
50'3 per cent, was absorbed by stipends and fees to the Teaching 
Staff; ,4,371 or lO'g per cent, by Departmental Expenses (including 
apparatus, wages, etc.), .320 or '8 per cent, by the Department for 
Women (minor expenses), ,338 or '8 per cent, by the deficit on the 
Day Training College, .1,078 or 27 per cent, by the Library, .3,616 
or 9 per cent, by the Museum, .6,802 or 16^9 per cent, by General 
Management Expenses (including rates and taxes), ,629 or r6 per cent, 
by interest on Trust Funds not specially invested, and ,447 or IT per 
cent, by various smaller expenses. 



For some years previous to 1894, there had been a serious deficit Temporary 
on each year's account; the deficit for the year 1893-4 was ,2,623, a d income Fund. 



the total deficit on the General Fund Income Account was ; 11,899. 
A Special Income Fund of .17,270 was then raised by 28 subscribers 
to put a stop to this recurring deficit ; it was hoped that further 
permanent sources of income might be raised during the five years over 
which the Special Fund was to be expended. Four yearly payments 
f 3,000 were made out of the fund, and the balance (,5,269) was 
handed to the Treasurer in 1899 with power to make a yearly transfer 
of not more than ,1,500 in any one year to the General Fund of 
the College. The hopes of the subscribers to the fund have not yet 
been fully realised, in great measure owing to the rapid internal expan- 
sion of the College. An increase in the number of students and in 
their requirements, especially in the higher work of Honours Schools, 
cannot in any University or University College be met by a corre- 
sponding increase in the fees (') ; and again, each extension in buildings 
provided by special subscriptions entails an increased charge for 
maintenance, which has to be supplied from the Fund for General 
Purposes. 

Thus the natural progress of the College necessarily brings with it T h<! i mme . 
financial difficulties. It is at present an urgent necessity that the debts Financial 
on the New Medical School Buildings and the Physical Laboratory, and Coiiege 
the accumulated adverse balance, should be extinguished, and that such a 
sum should be added to the Fund for General Purposes as would 
provide an income sufficient to enable the ordinary work to be carried 
on without incurring an annual deficit. This annual deficit, as will be 
seen from Table I., now amounts to from ,2,000 to ,2,500. 

(') The average income per student derived from fees was ^17 in 1898-9; the average 
expenditure per student (as calculated by dividing the total income by the number of students) 
was about ,40. 





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i FOR THE SESSION, 185 


EXPEND! 

Professors' and Lecturers' Salaries 
Fees and Assistant Lecturers' 
Departments 
Departmental Expenses (including 
atus, and current expenses) 


(t.J Arts, science, and Law 
(if.) Medical 
(iii.) Department for Wom< 
Day Training College adverse bal 
Library (including salaries, wages, a 
on books) 
Museum Total Expenditure (c) .. 
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INCOME 


RECEIPTS. 

eceived from Students 
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) Evening Classes ... 
.) Medical Department 
) Department for Women 


iment Grant 
ester Corporation Technical 
uction Grant 
hire County Council Technical 
uction Grant 
orated Law Society of the Uni 
ingdom 


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( 35 ) 



IV.-Buildings* 



The main site of the Owens College occupies, as will be seen from 
the plan, an irregular area of about 240,000 square feet, bounded by 
Oxford Street, Burlington Street, Lloyd Street, and Coupland Street. The 
Physical Institute, connected with the Central Building by a subway, is on 
the north side of Coupland Street, and is described on p. 55. 

The whole of the Owens College buildings on the main site are from the 
designs of Messrs. Alfred Waterhouse and Son. They include (i) the main 
buildings, which are of stone, modern Gothic in style, and occupy a quad- 
rangle with a frontage of 304 feet to Oxford Street, and a depth of 322 feet. 
The oldest portion, completed in 1874, is the west side of the quadrangle, 
designated elsewhere as the Central Building. This includes the large 
Chemistry Theatre, the History Theatre, and the class-rooms for all other 
Arts subjects and for Engineering, the Principal's Room, the Professors' 
Common Room, a large Reading Room (a portion of the former Library), 
the Women Students' Common Room, and other rooms. The basement 
of this building has been chiefly occupied by Physics hitherto. The north 
side of the quadrangle is occupied by the Beyer Buildings, containing the 
Natural History Laboratories and Lecture Rooms and a portion of the 
Museum, completed in 1887. The northern half and centre of the east 
side of the quadrangle are mainly occupied by the Museum, but this 
portion of the building includes also the Council Chamber, a fine room with 
oak panelling, approached from the main entrance by the grand stair- 
case. On the southern half of. the east side of the quadrangle, the 
Whitworth Hall building (see p. 18) is now being erected. The Large Hall 
is to be on the first floor. It will be 120 feet long, 50 feet broad, with a 
high-pitched oak roof, of which the apex will be 56^ feet from the floor. 
At the northern end there will be an organ-loft separated from the main 
portion by an elaborate oak screen ; at the southern end, a large gallery 



( 36 ) 

and two smaller galleries. The sides of the hall will be of polished 
stone. It is designed to seat about 1,000 persons. 

The south side of the quadrangle is occupied by the Christie Library, 
described on p. 117. 

The separate buildings in the space behind the quadrangle are of brick 
faced with stone. They include (i) the Chemical Laboratories ; (2) the 
Whitworth Engineering Laboratory ; (3) the Medical School, 'covering 
an area of 27,500 square feet ; and abutting against this (4) the Gymnasium 
and Fives Court. Details of these buildings are described in the course 
of the book. 

A house on the east side of Oxford Street (Dover House) is at present 
leased by the Council as a Refectory for the Staff and students, and as a 
Club House for the students (see p. 125). 

The builders of the Central Building and the older portion of the 
Chemical Laboratories were Messrs. T. Clay and Son ; of part of the 
Medical School and the Schorlemmer Laboratory, Messrs. R. Neill and 
Sons ; of the Beyer Buildings, Museum, and Whitworth Hall, part of 
the Medical School, and the Physical Institute, Messrs. William Southern 
and Sons ; of the Christie Library, Mr. H. Vickers. The erection of all 
the buildings, except those erected in 1874, has been superintended by 
Mr. W. Rutherford, as clerk of the works. 




THE PRINCIPAL STAIRCASE. 



/>*/,'> II-, If /.,/,.. H'itlli,,ft, a .M*>KluatT. 



(MMrfe ty If. S- S IM. 



( 37 ) 

V.-The Relation of the College to the 
Victoria University. 

UNIVERSITY COURSES OF STUDY. 

On the history of the foundation of the University, see p. 10. 

The Victoria University at present includes three constituent Colleges The Colleges 

of the Uni- 

the Owens College, Manchester, University College, Liverpool, and the versity. 
Yorkshire College, Leeds ; the respective share of the Colleges in the 
government of the University depends on their " relative magnitude and 
efficiency " (Charter, chap, ix., 10). 

The seat of the University is in Manchester.(') 

The chief function of the Universfty is to confer degrees and dis- The functions 
tinctions on such persons as have pursued prescribed courses of study in versity. 
one of the constituent Colleges, and passed prescribed examinations held 
by the Examiners of the University. The University has no jurisdiction 
or control over the Colleges except with regard to the laying down of 
regulations for the duration and nature of the courses of study required 
for University degrees and distinctions (Charter, chap. xxiv.). 

The University also has the power to examine schools ; and it has 
organized a scheme of University Extension Lectures, similar to the 
schemes of the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, and the London 
Society for the Extension of University Teaching, which is about to be 
affiliated to the University of London. 

The Queen is the Visitor of the University. The authorities of the 
University, according to the Charter, are : (i.) The Chancellor and Vice- 

(') The Charter (chap, xvii.) stipulates that until the University shall possess buildings cf 
its own, the Owens College must provide the necessary accommodation. 

H 



( 38 ) 

Chancellor ; (ii.) The Court, which is the supreme body ; with (iii.) 
an executive committee of the Court, called the Council ; and (iv.) the 
Convocation of the University. The Charter also provides for the con- 
stitution of (v.) the General Board of Studies, which has extremely 
important functions. 

Constitution The constitution of the Court is given in detail in the foot-note 

and (unctions 

of the Court. below.(') 

The Court has full power to make and alter the statutes of the 
University (provided that no statute shall be repugnant to certain prin- 
ciples laid down in the Charter). ( 2 ) 

The Court meets at least twice yearly. 

The Court has power to admit any incorporated College as a con- 
stituent College of the University under certain well-defined conditions. 
If the Court refuse any application, the College applying may appeal to 
the Privy Council, which has final authority in this matter. 



(') The Court under present regulations should consist of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, 
and 70 other members ; but, as 3 members serve in a double capacity, the total number of 
members is reduced to 69 : 

6 are members nominated by the Crown or Lord President of the Council for life. 
6 are members nominated by the Lord President of the Council for six years. 
3 are members nominated by the Chancellor for six years. 
10 are members nominated by Convocation for four years. 
19 are representatives of the Owens College, Manchester. 
14 are representatives of University College, Liverpool. 
1 2 are representatives of the Yorkshire College, Leeds. 

The representatives of the Owens College are the President, Chairman of the Council, 
and Principal, ex officio ; 4 members chosen by and from the Senate for four years ; and 
is members chosen by the Court of Governors for four years. The representatives of 
the other Colleges are chosen in a similar way. 

(*) Thus, no religious tests may be imposed by the University on any person. 



( 39 ) 
The constitution of the Council is given in the foot-note below.(') Constitution 

and functions 

The Council carries on the general administration of the University, 
and also deals with such special business as is delegated to it by the 
Court. The Council meets, ordinarily, twice in every term. 

The Convocation consists of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Professors Constitutions 

and function* 

and Lecturers of the University, and of all registered graduates of three oftheCono- 
years' standing. 

The Convocation elects the Chancellor and ten members of the University 
Court. It has the " power of discussing and of declaring an opinion on 
any matter whatsoever relating to the University," and of reporting its 
proceedings to the Court and Council. Its function is thus, generally 
speaking, to convey officially the opinion of the general body of graduates 
and of the academic staff on all matters of policy to the executive 
authorities of the University. 

All Professors of the constituent Colleges are, ipso facto. Professors Professors of 

the Uni- 

of the University. versity. 

The Lecturers of the University consist of certain Lecturers of the Lecturers of 

the Uni- 

constituent Colleges, appointed by the University Court after nomination 
by the Court and Senate of their respective Colleges. 

(') The Council consists at present of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor tx-offido, and 31 
members. Of these 

6 are nominated by the Lord President of the Council. 

2 are appointed by the Court from among such of its members as are elected by 

Convocation. 
4 are appointed by the Court from its members generally. 

7 are representatives of the Owens College, Manchester. 
6 are representatives of University College, Liverpool 

6 are representatives of the Yorkshire College, Leeds. 

The representatives of the Owens College consist of the President, Chairman of the 
Council, and Principal, and of the four members of the Senate who are also members of ihe 
University Court. All members of the Council, except ex-^fficio members, hold office for 
four years. 



Constitution 
of the General 
Board of 
Studies. 



Examiners of The Examiners of the University consist of the Professors of the 

versify. University, together with certain Lecturers of the University chosen by 

the General Board of Studies, and at least one External Examiner in each 

subject prescribed in any degree-course. 

The General Board of Studies consists of the Examiners (Internal 
and External) of the University for the time being. 

The chief functions of the General Board of Studies are 

(i.) To prepare the statutes and regulations relating to examinations 
for approval by the Council and Court. 

(2.) To prescribe each year special subjects for examination in 
accordance with the statutes and regulations. 

The discussion of all matters relating to special subjects is carried 
on first in one of the 12 Departmental Boards.(') 

The following Degrees are conferred by the University : The 
Degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Letters 
(B.A., M.A., Litt.D.) ; of Bachelor of Science, Master of Science, and 
Doctor of Science, (B.Sc., M.Sc., D.Sc.) ; of Bachelor of Laws, and 
Doctor of Laws (LL.B., LL. D.) ; of Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery, 
Doctor of Medicine, and Master of Surgery (M.B. and Ch.B., M.D., 
M.Ch.) ; of Bachelor of Music and Doctor of Music (Mus.B., Mus.D.). 

All candidates for Degrees are required to pass, at least two years before 
the Degree examination, a Preliminary Examination in English Language 
and at least one other language, English History, Mathematics, and two 
other subjects chosen from a certain number. In many cases candidates 
pass the examination before entering College. 



The Degrees 
conferred by 
the Uni- 
versity. 



Preliminary 
Examination. 



(') These deal with (i.) Ancient Languages and Literature ; (ii.) Modern Languages 
and Literature; (iii.) History and Political Economy; (iv.) Philosophy; (v.) Mathematics; 
(vi.) Engineering ; (vii.) Physics and Chemistry ; (viii.) Biology ; (ix.) Geology ; (x.) Law ; 
(xi.) Medicine and Surgery; (xii.) Music. 



In order to obtain the Degree of Bachelor, attendance at a College of 
the University for at least three years is required in the faculties of Arts, uSHSdtj. 
Science, and Law ; for at least two years in the faculty of Music. 
Candidates for the higher Degrees are exempt as a rule from further 
attendance. In the faculty of Medicine attendance in a recognised Medical 
school is required for at least five years, but of these two only are 
required to be spent at a College of the University. 

Students in the faculties of Arts, Science, and Law, are required to 
attend from eight to twelve lectures weekly. In the Experimental and 
Natural Sciences from one to three days' (six to eighteen hours') laboratory 
work is required in addition. In Medicine, students must attend at least 
two courses of lectures or laboratory work, or one course of lectures and 
laboratory work together with hospital practice, throughout each session. 
In Music, students are required to attend certain theoretical courses. 

In the faculties of Arts and Science the Degree of Bachelor is of Examinations 

for Ordinary 

two kinds, the Ordinary Degree, and the Decree with Honours. B.A. and 

7 & B.Sc. Degrees. 

For the Ordinary Degree three or four distinct subjects are required, B.A. and 
but candidates may select these from a very large number of alternatives, giees. 
Candidates undergo two examinations at an interval of at least a session. 

To obtain a Degree with Honours special proficiency must be shown 
in a single principal subject, and in certain closely related subjects. 

Degrees in Arts are given in the following Honours schools : (i.) 
Classics, (ii.) History, (iii.) English Language and Literature, (iv.) Modern 
Languages and Literature, (v.) Philosophy. Degrees in Science are given 
in the following Honours schools : (vi.) Mathematics, (vii.) Engineering, 
(viii.) Physics, (ix.) Chemistry, (x.) Zoology, (xi.) Physiology, (xii.) Geology, 
Mineralogy, and Palaeontology, (xiii.) Botany. Candidates for these degrees 
undergo one examination. (') Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Laws fc, LL.B, 

M.B. and' 

Ch.B.,and 

(') In Natural and Experimental Science, in addition to the written examinations, there is J 
held a practical examination extending, in most cases, over three days. 



( 42 ) 

undergo two examinations ; for that of Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery, 
three examinations ; for that of Bachelor of Music, two examinations. 

Requirements The M.A. and M.Sc. Degrees are conferred without examination on 

for Degrees 

higher than graduates who have taken the B.A. or B.Sc. Degree with Honours. 

tht of fe 

Bachelor. Graduates who have taken the Ordinary B.A. or B.Sc. Degree must pass 
a further examination. The degree of Ch.M. is conferred after examination. 
For the Degree of Doctor, an original thesis in the Faculties of Arts, 
Science, Law, and Medicine, and an original composition in that of Music, 
must be presented and approved. Candidates for the Mus.D. Degree must 
also pass a written examination. 

^ e fN wm g figures give approximately the total cost (') for the 
three years' attendance necessary to obtain the degrees named. 

B.A. degree College fees, 51. University fees, <)(*}. 
B.Sc. degree College fees, ,65. University fees, 
LL.B. degree College fees, ,24. ( 3 ) University fees, 
Mus.B. degree College fees, ^5. University fees, 10. 

For the five years' attendance necessary to obtain the degree of M.B. 
and Ch.B. the total College fees average about ^100, the fees for 
Hospital Practice at the Royal Infirmary, etc., about .44, and the 
University fees ^i7( 3 ). 

The fee for a single course of lectures of 3 hours weekly is 3. IDS., 
fora course of 2 hours weekly 2. 123. 6d., and for a course of i hour 
weekly \. us. 6d. 

The fee for laboratory work varies in the different laboratories from 
16. i6s. to 21 (for six days per week), the fee for a lesser number of days 
being proportionately smaller. . 

(') The cost varies in the different Honours Schools according to the amount and kind 
of laboratory work required. 

(") jio in the case of Honours degrees. 

( 3 ) This estimate pre-supposes that the Preliminary Examination has been passed by 
the candidate before commencing his professional studies. 



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( 43 ) 



VL-The Arts, Science, and Law 

Department* 



In the Arts, Science, and Law Department, the Academic Year extends from the 
beginning of October to the end of June, and is divided into three Terms: 
Michaelmas, Lent, and Easter. The majority of courses extend through the 

three Terms. 

1 i 

CLASSICS. 

The staff consists of the following : Professor of Latin and Greenwood 
Lecturer in Greek Testament Criticism, A. S. WILKINS, M.A. (Lond.), 
Litt.D. (Camb. and Dublin), LL.D. (St. And.) (Fellow of University College, 
London) (1869) f (') ; Assistant Lecturer in Latin, W. C. SUMMERS, M.A. 
(Late Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge) (1895). 

Hulme Professor of Greek and of Comparative Philology, JOHN 
STRACHAN, M.A. (Camb. and Aberd.), LL.D. (Aberd.) (1885) ('), (Late 
Fellow of Pembroke College, Cambridge) ; Assistant Lecturer in Greek, 
A. E. TAYLOR, M.A. (Late Fellow of Merton College, Oxford) (1896)4 

Ten courses are given in Latin, and eight in Greek (including 
practical courses in Composition), two in Greek Testament Criticism, one 
in Comparative Philology, and one in Sanskrit. The students consist 
chiefly of candidates for the Pass and Honours Schools of the Victoria 
University. 

In the Honours School of Classics in the Victoria University, 32 
students have graduated. Of these the majority have been ministers of 
religion, or have adopted education as their profession. Some have 

(') Elected Greenwood Lecturer in 1890. 

(') Appointed Professor of Comparative Philology in 1890. 



( 44 ) 

entered the Civil Service, or have been called to the Bar. Of those who 
have carried on more advanced work in Classics, most have proceeded 
to the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, where many distinctions 
have been gained. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The Professorships of 
Latin and Greek receive a portion of the annual grant from the Hulme 
Trustees (see page 13). The Greenwood Lectureship in Greek Testa- 
ment Criticism was endowed in 1890 with a sum of ,2,000 by Mr. 
Charles James Heywood. There are several important Scholarships, etc., 
awarded in Classics, for details of which see pp. 134, 137-8, 143. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Greek. 
Appointed 1851. J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1885.! 

Latin. 
1851. J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D.; resigned i869.t 

Greek Testament. 

1851. J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D.; resigned 1889; Emeritus 
Professor; (deceased 1894). t 

Comparative Philology. 
1851. A. J. SCOTT, M.A. ; deceased i866.t 
1873. A. S. WILKINS, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. ; resigned 1890.! 

FORMER LECTURER IN CLASSICAL ARCHEOLOGY. 
Appointed 1889. Rev. CANON E. L. HICKS, M.A. ; resigned 1892. 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS IN CLASSICS. 

1863. W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A. ; elected Professor of Logic and Mental and Moral 

Philosophy, i866.t (') 

1866. ALFRED T. BENTLEY, M.A. ; resigned i868.t 
1868. A. S. WILKINS, M.A.; elected Professor 1869.! 
1873. E. B. ENGLAND, Litt.D. ; resigned 1892 (now Warden of Hulme Hall). 

(') Mr. Jevons held the post of " College Tutor " in Classics and Mathematics from 1863 
to 1866; Mr. Bentley held the post from 1866 to 1868. 



( 45 ) 

Appointed 1883. SIDNEY G. OWEN, M.A. ; resigned 1890 (now Student, Censor, and Tutor of 

Christ Church, Oxford). 
1890. EDWARD FIDDES, M.A. ; resigned 1895 (now Secretary to the Council 

and Senate of the College, and College Tutor)t. 
1892. J. C. SMITH, M.A. ; resigned 1896 (now H.M. Inspector of Schools, 

Scotland). 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

The staff consists of the following : Smith Professor of English 
Language, T. NORTHCOTE TOLLER, M.A. (1880), (Late Fellow of Christ's 
College, Cambridge)! ; and Lecturer on English Literature, OLIVER ELTON, 
M.A. (Oxford) (1890). 

The classes in English Language include : 

(i.) an elementary class (i hr.) ; (ii.) a course of 3 hours, including 
History of the Language (2 hrs.), and Old English Prose Authors 
(i hr.) ; (iii.) a course of 3 hours, including Old English Poetical Literature 
(2 hrs.), and Gothic (i hr.) ; (iv.) a course of 3 hours, including Old 
English Poetical Literature (2 hrs.), and Icelandic (i hr.). 

(i) is intended for students who are preparing for the Preliminary 
Examination of the University, (ii.) and (iii.) form part of the course for 
the ordinary degree in the case of those students who choose English 
Language as one of their optional subjects ; the same classes, with the 
omission of Gothic, satisfy the requirements with regard to attendance, 
which are fixed in the case of students in the Literature branch of the 
Honours School of English Language and Literature, (iv.) is taken 
in addition to (ii.) and (iii.) by students (a) who take the Language branch 
of the Honours School of English Language and Literature ; (b) who 
take English in the Honours School of Modern Languages. 

The Literature Department, until 1888 united with that of History, 
is now in charge of an independent Lecturer. 

i 



( 46 ) 

The courses in Literature include (i.) a General course (3 hrs.) for 
Pass and Honours students together ; (ii. and iii.) two Special Honours 
courses (each of 2 hrs.) dealing with a special period and books, which 
vary from year to year ; and (iv.) a course on English Composition. 

All candidates for Arts degrees and for the Honours School of 
English are bound to take the general course in Literature. The advanced 
classes work for the Honours School of English, of which the literary side 
was created in 1892-3. The Professor of English Language and the 
Lecturer on English Literature co-operate in teaching all English 
Honours candidates, so that a student must specialise in either branch 
but qualify duly in the other. Since 1895 two University scholars have 
been elected in English Literature, and one of these has since become 
a University Fellow. 

In the Honours School of Modern Languages, both Language and 
Literature are required for the English Section. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1880 Miss J. 
Durning Smith, Sir Edwin Burning-Lawrence, Bart., M.P., and Lady 
Durning- Lawrence, gave .5,000 to establish a Professorship of English 
Language in memory of the late John Benjamin Smith, M.P., to which 
endowment the donors added ^4,000 in 1894. 

The Lectureship in Literature is entirely without endowment. 

There is a Shakspere Scholarship of ^40 for 2 years, founded by 
subscription, and there are also a number of Prizes in English (see p. 138). 
The University offers the John Bright Scholarship of ^100, biennially, for 
approved work in English Literature (see p. 133). 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 
Appointed 1851. A. J. SCOTT, M.A., deceased i866.f 

1866. A. W. WARD, M.A., Litt.D. ; resigned the Chair of English Language 
in 1875, and of Literature in 1889; elected Principal 1889.! 



( 47 ) 

FORMER LECTURERS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 
Appointed Assistant Lecturer in English 1872, Lecturer in English Language 1875, 

T. N. TOLLER, M.A. ; appointed Professor i88o.t 
Assistant Lecturer in Litefature 1882, J. P. WHITNEY, M.A. ; resigned 1887.! 

1887, JAMES TAIT, M.A. ; resigned 1889 (now Lecturer in 

Ancient History).! 

1889, W. A. RALEIGH, M.A. ; resigned 1890 (now Professor 

in University College, Liverpool). 

MODERN AND ORIENTAL LANGUAGES. 

The Staff consists of: Professor of French Language and Literature, 
VICTOR KASTNER, B. es L. (Univ. of France) (1895) f ; Assistant Lecturer, 
T. A. STEPHENS, B.A. (Lond.) (1897). 

Henry Simon Professor of Germafi Language and Literature, ARWID 
JOHANNSON, M.A. (Dorpat) (1895). 

Lecturer in Hebrew and Arabic, Rev. L. M. SIMMONS, B.A. (Lond.), 
LL.B. (Viet.) (1884) ('). 

For Sanskrit, see p. 43. 

In French Language and Literature eight courses are given, three of 
3 hours, two of 2 hours, and three of i hour weekly. An elementary 
knowledge of French is assumed on the part of all students. In the higher 
classes the lectures are delivered rn French, and are devoted to Historical 
French Grammar, and the reading of Old French texts, and to the 
study of a period of French Literature. Practical exercises are given 
in French Composition, and a special class has recently been established 
for Commercial Correspondence. 

In German Language and Literature eight courses are given, one of 
3 hours, four of 2 hours, and thfee of I hour weekly. The more advanced 
lectures are delivered in German, and deal with the History of German 
Literature, and with Gothic, Old and Middle High German, and Historical 
Grammar. Oral and written exercises are given in the use of the language. 

(') Appointed' Lecturer in Arabic in 1886. 



( 48 ) 

A special class has recently been established for Commercial 
Correspondence. 

In Hebrew are given an elementary and an advanced course of 3 hours 
each, with a special course on more difficult texts occasionally (2 hrs.). 

In Arabic an elementary course (2 hrs.) is given. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1895 Mr. Henry 
Simon gave a sum of .5,000 for the endowment of the Professorship of 
German Language and Literature. 

For Scholarships and Prizes, see pp. 138, 143. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 
French Language and Literature. 
Appointed 1866. T. THEODORES ;(') resigned 1871. t 

German Language and Literature. 
Appointed 1866. T. THEODORES ;(') resigned 1880. t 

Hebrew. 

Appointed 1851. A. J. SCOTT, M.A., resigned i86o.t 

Lecturer 1860, Professor 1866. T. THEODORES; resigned 1884; Emeritus Professor, 

(deceased i886).t 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
French Language and Literature. 
Appointed 1851. A. PODEVIN; resigned 1866. 

1871. HERMANN BREYMANN, Ph.D.; resigned 1875 (now Professor in the 

University of Munich). 
1875. J. F. H. LALLEMAND, B. es Sc. ; resigned 1885 (now Professor at 

University College, London). 
1885. VICTOR KASTNER, B. es L., appointed Professor 1895.! 

German Language and Literature. 
1851. T. THEODORES, (') appointed Professor 1866. t 
1871. HERMANN BREYMANN, Ph.D. ; resigned 1875 (see also above). 
1880. HERMAN HAGER, Ph.D.; deceased 1895. 

(') Professor Theodores was elected "Professor of Oriental and Modern Languages" in 1866. 



( 49 ) 

PHILOSOPHY. 

The Staff consists of the following : Professor of Philosophy, 
SAMUEL ALEXANDER, M.A. (Late Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford) 
(1893); Assistant Lecturer, A. E. TAYLOR, M.A. (Late Fellow of Merton 
College, Oxford) (1896)4 

The following courses are given : 

I. Elementary courses: (i.) Logic (2 hrs.) ; (ii.) Psychology and 

Ethics (3 hrs.). 

II. Advanced courses : (i.) Psychology for candidates for Ordinary 

B.Sc. degree and for Philosophy Honours (3 hrs.); 
(ii.) History of Modern and History of Ancient Philosophy 
in alternate years (3 hours each) for candidates for 
Ordinary B.A. degree and for Philosophy Honours ; 
(iii.) for Honours Students, courses on (a) Logic (i hr.), 
(6) Special questions in Psychology (i hr.) and (c) Ethics 
(i hr.), (d) Special Authors (Kant, Socrates, and Plato) 
(2 hrs.), (e) Essays on Philosophical subjects. The 
courses are not all given in each year. 

There is a small number of students each year who either take 
Honours in Philosophy or read for the degree of M.A. in Philosophy, 
which involves more than the half of the former course. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

[Until 1896 the title used for the subject was " Logic and Mental and Moral Philosophy."] 
Appointed 1851. A. J. SCOTT, M.A. ; deceased i866.f 

1866. W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., F.R.S. ; resigned 1876.1 
1876. R. ADAMSON, M.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1893 (now Professor in the 
University of Glasgow).! 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 
1885. (In Logic.) ALFRED SIDGWICK, B.A. ; resigned 1886. 
1890. J. S. MACKENZIE, M.A. ; resigned 1893 (now Professor in University- 
College, Cardiff), t 



( 50 ) 

HISTORY. 

The Staff consists of the following : Professor of History, and 
Bishop Fraser Lecturer in Ecclesiastical History, T. F. TOUT, M.A. 
(Late Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford) (1890) (') ; Lecturer in Ancient 
History, and Assistant Lecturer in Modern History, JAMES TAIT, M.A. 
(Oxford and Viet.) (Late Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford) (1887) ( 2 ) t ; 
Assistant Lecturer, A. J. SARGENT, B.A. (Late Senior Hulmeian 
Exhibitioner of Brasenose College, Oxford) (1899).! 

The following courses are given : 

I. In Ancient History: (i.) a course on the outlines of Greek 

and Roman History (2 hrs.) ; (ii.) a course on a special 
period of Greek History (2 hrs.) ; and (iii.) a course on 
a special period of Roman History (2 hrs.). 

II. In Mediaeval and Modern History : (i.) Outlines of English 

History (2 hrs.) ; (ii.) Outlines of Mediaeval History (2 hrs.) ; 
(iii.) a period of Modern English History (2 hrs.) ; (iv.) 
English Mediaeval History, including Constitutional (i hr.) 
(v.) Italian History 1417-1492 (3 hrs. for two terms); 
(vi.) The Hundred Years War (2 hrs.) ; the last two being 
the special subjects for History Honours 1900; (vii.) 
Essays on Historical subjects (three sections of i hr. each). 

III. In Ecclesiastical History : one course in the Early History 

of the Christian Church (i hr.), and one course in English 
Church History from the reign of Henry VIII. (i hr.). 

From the early days of the College systematic efforts have been 
made to found a school of research, and the establishment of the History 
Honours School in the Victoria University has had a marked effect on 
the progress of the Department from this point of view. In addition to 

(') Appointed Bishop Fraser Lecturer in iSgk 

(*) Appointed Lecturer in Ancient History in 1896. 



the large number of students who present History as a selected subject 
in Pass Examinations, 36 students have graduated in History Honours 
(10 in the First Class, 24 in the Second, and 2 in the Third). In 
October, 1899, there were 16 undergraduates reading for Honours. It 
may be mentioned that of the twenty-five contributors to the Oxford 
Historical Atlas, five are past or present students of the College, and 
six of the Honours graduates (besides many other students, and past 
or present members of the teaching staff) are contributors to the 
Dictionary of National Biography, and six to the English Historical 
Review. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. --The endowment of 
the Bishop Fraser Lectureship in Ecclesiastical History consists of a sum 
of about ,4,000, bequeathed by Mrs. Fraser in 1895 for this purpose. 
There are also (i) A Fellowship of ^150 per annum, tenable for two 
years, and an Entrance Scholarship of ,35, tenable for two years, 
founded by bequest of the late T. E. Jones, Esq., of Manchester. (2) A 
Scholarship of ^35 per annum, tenable for one year, founded by Miss 
Mary Bradford in memory of her brother, William Bradford, Esq. For 
other Exhibitions and Prizes, see pp. 139, 143. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 
Appointed 1851. J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1854.! 

1854. R. C. CHRISTIE, M.A. ; resigned 1866 (late Chancellor of the Diocese of 

Manchester).! 
1866. A. W. WARD, Litt.D., M.A. ; resigned 1897 ; Emeritus Professor.t 

FORMER LECTURERS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872. T. N. TOLLER, M.A. ; resigned 1875 (now Professor of English 

Language).! 
Assistant Lecturer, 1882. J. P. WHITNEY, M.A. ; resigned 1887.! 

1893. ALICE M. COOKE, M.A. ; resigned 1897 (now Assistant 

Tutor in the Department for Women).f 
1898. J. RAMSAY B. MUIR, M.A. ; resigned 1899 (now Assistant 
Lecturer in University College, Liverpool). 



( 52 ) 

ECONOMICS. 

Stanley Jevons Professor and Cobden Lecturer in Political Economy, 
A. W. FLUX, M.A. (Late Fellow of St. John's College, Cambridge) 
(i8 9 8).t 

The following courses are given : (i.) Descriptive Economics (i hr.) ; 
(ii.) Economic Theory (2 hrs.) ; (iii.) Industrial and Commercial History 
of England from 1760 to 1860 (i hr.) ; (iv.) The Principles of Inter- 
national Trade (i hr. for one term); (v.) The History of the English 
Poor Law (i hr.). For Evening Classes, see p. 89. 

ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1866 the Cobden Memorial 
Committee gave .1,500 towards the endowment of a chair, and ,442 
for the foundation of prizes in Political Economy (see p. 139). 

In 1869, a sum of ^200 was received for the provision of free 
public lectures. 

In 1875 the Rt. Hon. John Bright and Messrs. S. P. Robinson 
and Henry Rawson gave ^2,000, a portion of the last Anti-Corn Law 
League Fund, for the endowment of the department, to which a small 
sum from the same source was added in 1887. In 1898 Mr. Councillor 
W. T. Rothwell arranged to provide an endowment of ;ioo per annum 
to assist in the foundation of the Stanley Jevons Professorship of Political 
Economy. 

For Scholarships and Prizes, see p. 139. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 
Appointed 1855. R. C. CHRISTIE, M.A. ; resigned 1866. t 

1866. \V. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., F.R.S. ; resigned 1876. t 

1876. R. ADAMSON, M.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1882.! 

1882. J. E. CRAWFORD MUNRO, LL.M., LL.D. ; resigned 1890.! 

COBDEN LECTURERS. 
1891. J. S. MACKENZIE, M.A. ; resigned 1893. t 
1893. A. W. FLUX, M.A. ; appointed Professor 1898.! 



( 53 ) 

GEOGRAPHY. 

Lecturer on Political and Commercial Geography, A. J. SARGENT, 
B.A. (late Senior Hulmeian Exhibitioner of Brasenose College, Oxford) 

(i8 99 ).t 

The following courses are given : In Political and Commercial 
Geography (i.) Preliminary course (2 hrs.), and (ii.) Course on special 
subject (i hr.). 

For the course in Physical Geography, see p. 76. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. From 1892 to 1896 
inclusive, the Royal Geographical Society gave ^50 annually, and from 
1892 to 1895 inclusively the Manchester Geographical Society gave .50 
annually towards the maintenance of a Lectureship in Geography. The 
Lectureship is at present unendowed. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
1892. H. YULE OLDHAM, M.A. ; resigned 1894 (now Reader in the University of 

Cambridge). 
1894. A. J. HERBERTSON, Ph.D.; resigned 1896 (now Assistant to the Reader in 

the University of Oxford). 
1896. A. W. FLUX, M.A. ; resigned 1899.! 

MATHEMATICS. 

The staff consists of the following : Beyer Professor, HORACE LAMB, 
M.A. (Camb.), LL.D. (Glasgow), F.R.S. (Late Fellow of Trinity College, 
Cambridge) (1885); Fielden Lecturer, R. F. GWYTHER, M.A. (Camb.) 
(1874); Richardson Lecturer, F. T. SWANWICK, M.A. (Camb.) (1883); 

Assistant Lecturer, H. C. PLUMMER, B.A. (Oxford) (1899). 



The courses given are as follows: Preliminary course (3 hrs.), Inter 
mediate course (3 hrs.), and first, second, and third years Honours courses, 
each consisting of six lectures weekly, three for Pure and three for Applied 
Mathematics. Examples are set, as a rule, to students at the conclusion of 

K 



( 54 ) 

each lecture. Classes are also held, from time to time, in advanced subjects 
not dealt with in the regular courses. Exercise and Tutorial classes are 
held, at which the students receive assistance in the working of problems 
and examples. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 
Appointed 1851. ARCHIBALD SANDEMAN, M.A. ; resigned 1865. t 

1865. THOMAS BARKER, M.A. ; resigned 1885 ; Emeritus Professor. 

Applied Mathematics. 
Appointed 1881. ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1888 (now Professor of Physics), t 

FORMER LECTURERS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1863. W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A. ; elected Professor of Logic and Mental and 
Moral Philosophy, 1866. t (See also p. 44, note.) 

1866. ALFRED T. BENTLEY, M.A. ; resigned 1880 (late Registrar of the Victoria 

University).! 

1880. J. E. A. STEGGALL, M.A. ; resigned 1883 (now Professor in University 
College, Dundee). 

1894. VV. E. PATERSON, B.A. ; resigned 1895. 

1895. Rev. A. P. McNEiLE, B.A. ; resigned 1898. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1874 the late Samuel 
Fielden, Esq., gave .5,500 for the endowment of the Fielden Lectureship 
in Mathematics. 

In 1890-1 a sum of ,3,600 was received by bequest of the late 
John Richardson, Esq., towards the endowment of the Richardson Lecture- 
ship in Mathematics. 

For Scholarships, etc., see pp. 140, 143, 144. 

PHYSICS. 

The staff consists of the following : Langworthy Professor of Physics 
and Director of the Physical Laboratory, ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D. 
(Heidelberg), F.R.S. (i888)f ; Professor of Physics, T. H. CORE, M.A. 
(Edin.) (1870); Assistant Director of the Laboratories and Lecturer, 
CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc. (Viet.) (1891); Demonstrators and Assistant 



( 55 ) 

Lecturers, ROBERT BEATTIE, B.Sc. (Durham) (1896), S. R. MILNER, D.Sc. 
(Lond.) (1898), R. S. HUTTON, M.Sc. (Viet.) (1900). 

BUILDINGS. Hitherto the Physical laboratory has occupied almost 
the whole of the base of the west side of the quadrangle, with a lecture- 
room and apparatus-room on the floor above. The dynamos have been 
placed in a special building in the courtyard. In the spring of 1900 it is 
hoped to remove the Department to the new Physical Institute, a separate 
building in Coupland Street, erected from the designs of J. W. Beaumont, 
Esq., F.R.I.B.A., and now fast approaching completion. The building 
occupies a plot 105 ft. by 72 ft. 

The basement contains separate rooms for researches at constant 
temperatures (27 ft. by 19 ft.), for spectroscopic research (36 ft. by 23 ft.), 
for photometry (36 ft. by 16 ft.), for photography (36 ft. by 23 ft.), for 
experiments with liquid air (36 ft. by 19 ft.), and for the standardising 
of scientific instruments (23 ft. by 28 ft.). 

The ground floor will contain a private laboratory (27 ft. by 19 ft.), 
the workshop (21 ft. by 19 ft.), separate rooms for the study of the magnetic 
properties of iron (36 ft. by 19 ft.), and for electrical experiments (23 ft 
by 28 ft.). 

The first floor will contain the elementary laboratory (36 ft. by 48 ft.), 
the Professor's private room, rooms for optical work (23 ft. by 28 ft.), two 
rooms for electrical work (20 ft. by 24 ft. and 33 ft. by 21 ft.), and a balance 
room (16 ft. by 21 ft.). 

The second floor will contain a lofty, large lecture-room (36 ft. by 48 ft.), 
seating 200 students, communicating with an apparatus-room, and a room 
for the preparation of lecture experiments, a small lecture-room (21 ft. by 
19 ft.) for advanced lectures, a dark room, for work with a Rowland grating 
and other experiments on physical optics (23 ft. by 28 ft.), provided with 
a small opening in the wall through which a beam from a heliostat can 
be introduced, several rooms for advanced students, and a museum for the 
preservation of historical apparatus. 



( 56 ) 

There is also on this floor a balcony for putting up heliostats, etc., 
and a room in which a transit instrument will be placed and from which 
a clear view to the south and also a view of the pole star" may be 
obtained. On the roof is erected an astronomical observatory, with a large 
lo-inch refracting equatorial, by Messrs. T. Cooke & Sons, of York, 
the gift of Sir Thomas Bazley, Bart. 

The John Hopkinson Electro-Technical Laboratory is a separate 
building occupying a basement and one floor directly connected with the 
ground floor of the main Physical Laboratory. 

The building was erected in memory of the late Dr. John Hopkinson, 
F.R.S., one of the most distinguished of former students of the College, 
by his parents and relations, and the fittings have been provided from a 
fund raised by his friends. 

The engine-room, with a gas engine of about 24 H.P., is in the base- 
ment, and will drive a long shaft, from which belts will pass through 
slits in the ceiling to the dynamo-house above. The dynamo-house (55 ft. 
by 27 ft.) will contain two multipolar direct current dynamos of 25 H.P. 
each, one alternate current dynamo of 25 H.P., and several smaller 
dynamos. Next to the dynamo house is the electro-chemical laboratory 
(36 ft. by 37 ft.). For electric furnace work currents of 350 amperes at 
75 volts, and for electrolytic work a current of 1,000 amperes at 15 volts, 
will be available. 

Nearly all the rooms of the laboratory are lined with glazed bricks. 
An electric lift is provided to take heavy apparatus from one floor to 
another. 

The Meteorological Observatory, given by the Whitworth Legatees, 
and placed in the Whitworth Park, about half-a-mile from the College, is 
completely fitted up with recording instruments. Observations are taken 
twice daily, and published in The Manchester Guardian, The Manchester 
Courier, and The Daily Dispatch, which newspapers contribute towards 
the maintenance of the observatory. (See also p. 58.) 




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( 57 ) 

LECTURE COURSES. The courses given are as follows : (i.) Elementary 
Mechanics (3 hrs.) with exercise class (i hr.) ; (ii.) Intermediate course 
(2 hrs.) ; (iii.) ist year's Honours course (3 hrs.) ; (iv.) and year's Honours 
course, in which use is made of the Calculus ; (v.) 3rd year's Honours 
course (chiefly advanced Mathematical Physics) (2 hrs.) ; (vi.) Electrical 
Technology, elementary course (i hr.) ; and (vii.) Electrical Technology, 
Honours course (i hr.). 

A PHYSICAL COLLOQUIUM is held once fortnightly, at which recent 
papers and discoveries in Physics and the allied subjects are discussed 
informally. The Colloquium is open without fee to all second and third 
years' and senior students. / 

LABORATORY COURSES. The following courses are held : (i.) Pre- 
liminary course on Mechanics (2 hrs. for i term) ; (ii.) Intermediate course, 
chiefly devoted to the verification of numerical laws discussed in the 
lectures (2 hrs.). 

Special courses in Chemical Physics (2 days a week for i term) 
are arranged for candidates for Chemical Honours, and a Special course 
is given in Electrical Technology. 

Students studying for the Final Ordinary Degree and for Honours 
Degrees work so many days a week at times convenient to themselves. 

Students may, if sufficiently advanced, undertake research work in the 
third year of their Honours Course, and such research may be accepted in 
lieu of part of the University Degree Examination. 

As soon as the new Institute is open, special courses both theoretical 
and practical will be given on electro-technical and more especially 
electro-chemical subjects. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1874, the late 
E. R. Langworthy, Esq., bequeathed ,10,000 for the endowment of the 
professorship. 

The late Mr. Richard Johnson, in 1870, gave ^500 for the purchase 
of apparatus. Mr. Henry Wilde, F.R.S., has given at various times 



( 58 ) 

a large electro-magnet, a dynamo, an electric lamp for purposes of 
projection, with parabolic mirrors, etc. 

In 1897, the Whitworth Legatees gave .1,500 for the endow- 
ment of the Meteorological Observatory presented by them. (See above, 
P- 56.) 

Towards the establishment of the new Physical Institute, an 
anonymous donor in 1897 gave ; 10,000, and another anonymous 
donor .5,000 for maintenance. Since then the following additional 
contributions have been received : (i) towards the Building Fund : 
Mr. R. C. Christie and Captain Partington, ,2,000 each ; the relatives 
and friends of the late Dr. John Hopkinson, ,1,894; Dr. Ludwig 
Mond, F.R.S., the late Mr. Henry Simon, Mr. J. P. Thomasson, and an 
anonymous donor, ,1,000 each; Messrs. Platt Bros. Ltd., ,500; Lord 
Ashton, Mr. W. G. Groves, and Mr. Neville Clegg, .250 each ; 
Mr. G. W. Agnew and an anonymous donor, .200 each ; and in smaller 
sums, ,50 ; (2) towards the Equipment Fund : the Lancashire County 
Council, ,500; Mr. I. Levinstein, .500; Sir Henry Roscoe, .190; 
Mr. W. Mather, ,250 ; Mr. W. J. Crossley, ,200 ; and in smaller 
sums about .700. A sum of about .8,000 is still required to complete 
the laboratory. 

Mr. R. H. Gibson and Mr. R. P. Blakeley have recently (1900) 
given a sum of ^"5,000, in memory of the late John Harling, Esq., for 
the foundation of a Research Fellowship and Scholarship in Physics. 
For details of these and other Scholarships, etc., see pp. 134, 140. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Appointed 1851. ARCHIBALD SANDEMAN ; resigned i86o.t 

1860. ROBERT B. CLIFTON, M.A., F.R.S. ; resigned 1866 (now Professor in the 

University of Oxford). 
1866. WILLIAM JACK, M.A. ; resigned 1870 (now Professor in the University of 

Glasgow). 
1870. BALFOUR STEWART, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. ; deceased 1887. 



( 59 ) 

FORMER DEMONSTRATORS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1870. FRANCIS KINGDON ; resigned 1876. 

1873. ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S. (Honorary Demonstrator); resigned 1876 
(now Professor), t 

1876. J. H. POYNTING, Sc.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1879 (now Professor in the 
University of Birmingham). 

1881. W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc. ; resigned 1891 (now Lecturer in the Man- 
chester Municipal Technical School). 

1889. H. E. HADLEY, B.Sc.; resigned 1892 (now Headmaster of Kidderminster 
Technical School). 

1892. W. G. RHODES, M.Sc. ; resigned 1894 (now Lecturer in the Salford Royal 

Technical Institute). 

1893. J. W. PICKLES, B.Sd ; resigned 1895. 

1894. W. GANNON, M. A. ; resigned 1896 (now Headmaster of Norwich Technical 

School). 

1895. ALBERT GRIFFITHS, D.Sc. ; resigned 1898 (now Lecturer in University Col- 

lege, Sheffield). 

ENGINEERING. 

The staff consists of the following : Beyer Professor of Engineering 
and Director of the Whitworth Laboratory, OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A. 
(Camb.), LL.D. (Glasgow), F.R.S. , M.I.C.E. (Hon. Fellow of Queens' 
College, Cambridge) (1868); Assistant Lecturers, J. B. MILLAR, M.E., 
Royal University of Ireland (1869), and C. B. DEWHURST, M.Sc. (Viet.) 
( 1 893)0); Demonstrators, GEORGE WILSON, D.Sc. (Viet.) (1896) ( 2 ), and 
J. H. GRINDLEY, M.Sc. (Viet.) (1899). 

BUILDINGS. The lecture-room is in the main building, and is provided 
with a special room (60 ft. by 30 ft.) for the apparatus used in the 
illustration of lectures. The drawing-room is 60 ft. by 30 ft., with table 
accommodation for 40 students drawing at the same time. 

(') Appointed Demonstrator 1891. 

(") Appointed Demonstrator 1892, Assistant Lecturer 1893, resigned 1895, re-appointed 
1896. 



( 60 ) 

THE WHITWORTH ENGINEERING LABORATORY, including a recent 
extension of 23 feet in width (see page 62), is a separate building, 93 ft. by 
70 ft. and 20 ft. high, lighted from the roof and three sides, and internally 
divided by glass partitions into five compartments the boiler room, engine 
room, testing room, workshop, and smithy all of which are supplied with 
power from shafting driven by an engine, independent of the experimental 
engines, which is continuously running. The object of this laboratory is to 
teach students and to enable them to practise those methods of measurement 
of quantities, whatsoever their nature, which belong to the work of the 
engineer. The necessity for a laboratory course to complete the education 
of an engineer, whether mechanical or civil, has arisen from the institution, 
which has taken place mainly during the last fifteen years, of definite 
mechanical tests, both for the strength of materials and for the efficiency of 
machines. The making of tests, both for materials and machines, and the 
reduction of the results, have thus become a most important part of engineers' 
work, and this importance is rapidly increasing. The training necessary for 
making and reducing these tests is essentially scientific, and can be best 
acquired in a laboratory worked in connection with a course of scientific 
study ; on the other hand, the laboratory work, by familiarising the student 
with practical mechanics in their higher developments, and by furnishing 
actual examples, gives to his scientific training a reality, the want of which 
has hitherto been greatly felt. 

The appliances in the laboratory are complete for 

(i.) Steam-engine trials. The boiler with natural or forced draught 
working up to 200 Ibs., and the three engines with expansion gear, surface 
condenser, special governors, and hydraulic brakes, afford hitherto unparal- 
leled opportunities for trials throughout the entire range of experience, from 
the single condensing and high pressure engine, to the triple expansion with 
or without steam jackets. An elaborate description of this engine, and of 
the trials made with it, was given by Professor Reynolds in a paper con- 
tributed to the Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1889. 




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These trials are continued from year to year, and the change in the efficiency 
of the engines recorded. The work of the engines is taken up by three of 
Reynolds' hydraulic brakes, which are self-adjusting, each brake being 
capable of absorbing from one to 80 II.P. at speeds varying from 80 to 400 
revolutions per minute. By noting the quantity of water passing through 
the brake and the rise of temperature, and comparing the number of thermal 
units thus discharged with the brake work, the value of the mechanical 
equivalent can be calculated. 

(2.) Testing materials for construction ; for this the loo-ton Wicksteed 
testing-machine, working with steady hydraulic pressure from nothing to 100 
tons, has been provided. There is also a novel throw-testing machine for 
testing the effect of reversals, and apparatus for dynamical experiments on 
belts, rolling friction, inertia, etc. During the session 1898-9, 925 tests 
were made and recorded, of which 383 were made for engineering firms and 
the public, without charge. 

(3.) Experiments on hydraulics. Two tanks are provided, each holding 
13,000 gallons, the one being 130 feet above the other. These are con- 
nected with four-inch rising and falling mains, and a quadruple centrifugal 
pump, which raises the 13,000 gallons in one hour. Measuring tanks, 
gauges, tumbling bays, turbines, and pumps have also been provided. 

(4.) Experiments on the fundamental mechanical actions ; for which, in 
addition to the steam, testing, and hydraulic machinery, there is provided 
shafting, with belt and rope gearing, to transmit up to 100 H.P. from the 
engine to the dynamometers. There is also an oil-engine with break and 
indicating gear. 

(5.) The study of the action of tools and the various properties and qual- 
ities of materials on which the processes of construction depend ; for which 
the workshop, which contains Whitworth lathes for wood and iron, planing, 
drilling, sawing, and shaping machines, fitter's and carpenter's benches, hand 
tools, and instruments of precision (including the Whitworth measuring 
machine), and the smithy, containing hearth, furnace, and tinman's appliances, 
are provided. 

L 



DAY CLASSES. Lectures. Three courses of lectures in engineering, 
each of three hours weekly, and three tutorial classes, each of two 
hours weekly, are given throughout the session ; they deal with 
descriptive engineering, earth work, masonry, timber work, measurement 
and surveying, kinematics and dynamics of machinery, theory of structures, 
strength of materials, machine-construction of machines, hydraulics, and the 
steam engine. The lectures are illustrated not only with diagrams, but with 
apparatus. Two special courses on geometrical, and three on mechanical, 
drawing are also given. Students are encouraged to attend courses in other 
subjects, and attendance at classes in mathematics, chemistry, and geology 
or physics is compulsory for those who wish to obtain either an Honours 
degree in the university or the college certificate in engineering. 

Practical Classes. Students spend at least two days a week in the 
laboratory and drawing-room during two sessions, and three days during the 
third. A special course in practical surveying is also held. 

EVENING CLASSES. These consist of (i.) a course on mechanical en- 
gineering (i hr.) extending over two years, (ii.) a course on civil engineering 
(i hr.) extending over two years, (iii.) two courses in the laboratory on 
engine trials, dynamometric measurement and the reduction of results, and 
the testing of materials. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1875 Mr. Charles 
Clifton, of Jersey, U.S.A., bequeathed the sum of .21,571 to the 
Department. Mr. C. F. Beyer specified that part of his large bequest (see 
p. 10) should be applied to the endowment of a professorship of engineering. 
In 1869 Mr. James Ashbury gave a sum of 5,200, in memory of his father, 
the late James Ashbury, for the general purposes of the department. In 
1886 the Whitworth Legatees gave _ 6,000 towards the erection of the 
laboratory, and Messrs. Mather and Platt gave .1,100 towards the cost of 
the fittings. A sum of .1,500 was recently given towards the extension 
of the laboratory by Manchester firms, in evidence of their appreciation 
of the work done gratuitously by the laboratory for the public, and in 




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addition Messrs. Dowson, Taylor & Co. have contributed ^300 towards 
equipment. 

For Scholarships, etc., see p. 141. 

GENERAL REMARKS. The number of day students, including graduates 
and scholars engaged in research, working in the laboratories during the last 
five sessions has been as follows : 

1895-6. 1896-7. 1897-8. 1898-9. 1899-1900. 

55 58 68 62 67 

It is recognised that the course given in engineering at a college must always 
be supplemented by training in the office of a civil, or the workshop of a 
mechanical, engineer. About half the college students become civil, and 
half mechanical, engineers, and many past students hold distinguished posi- 
tions in railways and works, and in the public services throughout the world. 
Among the former students of this department are Mr. J. J. Thomson, 
Sc.D., F.R.S., Cavendish Professor of Physics in the University of 
Cambridge; Mr. A. W. Brightmore, D.Sc., Professor of Engineering at the 
Indian Engineering College, Cooper's Hill ; Mr. S. Dunkerley, M.Sc., 
Professor of Applied Mechanics in the Royal Naval College, Greenwich ; 
and Mr. T. E. Stanton, D.Sc., Professor of Engineering at University 
College, Bristol. 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS. 

Appointed Demonstrator 1887. J. D. MACKINNON; resigned 1891. 

Assistant Lecturer, 1888. H. BAMFORD, M.Sc.; resigned 1893 (now Assistant 

Lecturer in the University of Glasgow). 

Demonstrator, 1892. T. E. STANTON, D.Sc., appointed Assistant Lecturer, 1893 ; 
resigned 1897. (See above.) 

1896, W. H. MOORBY, M.Sc. ; resigned 1897 (now Assistant Civil 

Engineer in H.M. Naval Establishments). 

1897. W. MASON, M.Sc. ; resigned 1899. 



64 



CHEMISTRY AND METALLURGY. 

The staff consists of the following : 

Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy and Director of the Chemical 
Laboratory, H. B. DIXON, M.A., F.R.S. (Late Fellow of Balliol College, 
Oxford) (1887) ; Demonstrators and Assistant Lecturers, G. H. BAILEY, 
D.Sc. (Lond.), Ph.D. (Heidelberg) (1885), P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc. (Lond. and 
Viet.) (1891), W. A. BONE, D.Sc. (Viet.), Ph.D. (Heidelberg) (late Fellow 
of the Victoria University) (1898) ('), E. J. RUSSELL, B.Sc. (Lond.) (1897), 
D. L. CHAPMAN, B.A. (Oxford) (1897), H. C. H. CARPENTER, B.A. (Oxford), 
Ph.D. (Leipzig) (1899); Assistant Lecturer in Metallurgy, W. A. BONE, 
D.Sc., Ph.D. (1898). 

Professor of Organic Chemistry, W. H. PERKIN, Jun., Ph.D. (Munich), 
F.R.S. (1892); Demonstrators and Assistant Lecturers, J. F. THORPE, 
Ph.D. (Heidelberg) (1896), W. T. LAWRENCE, B.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. 
(Berlin) (1897). 

BUILDINGS. The large theatre (66 ft. by 40 ft., and 32^ ft. in height), 
with its attached laboratory, and the chemical museum, are in the main 
building. The laboratory buildings consist of an older portion, occupying an 
area of 94 ft. by 94 ft., built in 1874, and the Schorlemmer portion, 64 ft. by 
34 ft., opened in 1895. The buildings are soft, in height from the basement 
to the roof. The chief features of the older portion are two large laboratories 
each 70 ft. long, 30 ft. broad, and 29 ft. high. No. i is devoted to the first 
year's or qualitative students, and in it there are about 80 working places. 
No. 2 is arranged for the advanced or quantitative students, and contains 
ten blocks of four benches each, for the accommodation of 40 students. 
These lofty rooms have each a capacity of upwards of 50,000 cubic feet. 
Ventilation is secured by a shaft and a furnace, which in the winter works 
the hot water heating-apparatus. There is, on each working bench, a 

(') Originally appointed 1894, resigned 1896, re-appointed 1898. 




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sulphuretted-hydrogen draught-closet, which communicates with a horizontal 
flue running beneath the fire-proof arching under the floor, and passing 
into the chimney ; the down draught in each of these closets is continuous 
and powerful. Along the walls of each laboratory larger draught 
cupboards are fitted, each connected with the main flue above. Pumps in 
the engine-room maintain a vacuum for filtering, and a blast for blow- 
pipe work. 

There are seven other rooms on this floor for blowpipe work, organic 
analysis, gas analysis, balances, etc. In the basement there are two labora- 
tories, one for medical and one for evening students, with accommodation 
for 45 and 50 workers respectively ; a metallurgical laboratory for 
instruction in practical assaying and the examination of ores and metal- 
lurgical products ; a spectroscopic and photographic room ; a dark room for 
photometry ; store rooms, and four rooms for original research. The first 
floor contains the professor's private room, balance room, and the private 
laboratory, from which the large laboratories beneath can be overlooked. 
A lecture room for organic chemistry, a room for the organic collection, 
and two rooms for original research work, were added on the first floor 
in 1890. 

The Schorlemmer laboratory is at the end of the main corridor of the 
older block of buildings. It measures 60 ft. by 30 ft., and has an arched roof 
30 feet high. The laboratory is designed to accommodate a professor, two 
demonstrators, and 36 students. The working benches have teak tops. 
Along the length of each bench a deep lead-lined gutter extends, falling at 
each end to an earthenware sink. Above the gutter the water-pipe is 
arranged with taps at intervals. The central gutter forms a convenient drain 
for all " condenser " water, and for all liquids which may be spilt on the bench. 
All the main-drains are semi-circular troughs laid in asphalt in the concrete 
floor. They are covered with movable boards, which permit of easy access 
to the whole system. The gutter and drains are thus arranged like those in 
the Munich organic laboratories; as at Munich also the lower portion of each 



( 66 ) 

large window is enclosed by a draught cupboard, fitted with two flues leading 
to the main chimney. Gas jets are provided in each flue. Eight large 
draught cupboards, 6 ft. 6 ins. by 2 ft., are thus available, and there are in 
addition two other recesses 8 ft. long provided with flues. One end of the 
laboratory is occupied by a slate table, 30 ft. long, covered with a ventilating 
hood and backed with glazed tiles, for the purpose of carrying out organic 
combustions. The whole laboratory is ventilated by a flue in the roof worked 
by an electric fan, the fresh air being admitted by adjustable gratings so as 
to pass between the hot-water pipes. The total cost of the Schorlemmer 
building was about ,5,000. 

DAY CLASSES. Lectures. The following courses of lectures are given 
on Pure Chemistry: (i.) General Chemistry course (3 hrs.), duplicated in 
the department for women ; (ii.) Introduction to Organic Chemistry (2 hrs. 
for one term) ; (iii.) ist year's Honours course, on the Non-metals (3 hrs.) ; 
(iv.) 2nd year's Honours course, on the Metals (3 hrs.) ; (v.) third year's 
Honours course, consisting of short courses on Stereo-chemistry and Physical 
Chemistry ; (vi.) General course on Organic Chemistry (3 hrs.) ; (vii.) 
Advanced course on Organic Chemistry (3 hrs.) ; (viii.) History of Chemistry 
(i hr.). The following courses are given on Applied Chemistry : (i.) 
Sulphuric Acid, Alkali, Bleaching Powder, and Chlorate of Potash, the 
course being supplemented by practical work and visits to works (i hr.) ; 
(ii.) Fuel and Illuminating Gas (i hr.) ; (iii.) Metallurgy (supplemented by 
visits to works) (i hr.) ; (iv.) The Chemistry of the Natural and Artificial 
Colouring Matters, and the Principles of Dyeing and Printing. 

There are also held Tutorial classes at which written exercises are 
corrected and discussed ; second and third year Honours men are required to 
write essays on subjects given out during the session. 

Laboratory Courses in Pure Chemistry, etc. Medical and elementary 
students are taken in classes (2 hours twice a week) ; others work at hours 
convenient to themselves for periods varying from two to five days a week, 
under the supervision of the professors and demonstrators. The first year 




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is devoted, as a rule, to inorganic preparations and qualitative analysis, the 
second to inorganic preparations and quantitative analysis, the third to 
organic preparations and the determination of physical constants ; in many 
cases a research under the supervision of one of the professors or demon- 
strators is also begun in the third year. At the end of this year a number 
of the students take the Honours degree in Chemistry in the university, and 
many of these stay on for a fourth and even a fifth year prosecuting research, 
while others return after having spent some time in a Continental laboratory. 

Laboratory Courses in Metallurgy and Fuel. The metallurgical labor- 
atory contains a wind-furnace, muffle, and all necessary apparatus for 
assaying and the making of alloys. There is also attached to it a special 
balance room with assaying balances. The laboratory possesses special 
appliances for the determination of the " calorific power " of fuels, and for 
the analysis and photometric tests of coal-gas. 

Higher Technical Organic Chemistry. In connection with the 
Schorlemmer Laboratory a higher Technical Organic Laboratory has (under 
the advice and with the aid of Mr. I. Levinstein and other donors) been 
fitted with apparatus and appliances, such as are used in the laboratories of 
works, for the preparation of pure organic substances. This, together with a 
small laboratory fitted with apparatus for dyeing and printing, has been 
placed under the direction of the Professor of Organic Chemistry. The 
object of the instruction given is to train students in the practical methods 
of preparing organic substances, such as are made on the larger scale 
in dye works, and of converting them into dyes. A special feature of 
the course consists of research work on the making of new dyes. In 
order to prepare students for work in this laboratory, a course of lectures 
is given on the chemistry of the natural and artificial colouring matters, 
and on the elementary principles of dyeing, calico-printing, etc. (Applied 
Chemistry, iv., above). Students are required to attend a short practical 
course in the dyeing laboratory, in order to familiarise themselves with 
the principles of dyeing, etc., as far as may be considered necessary for 



( 68 ) 

their subsequent work in the higher technical laboratory. These courses 
are arranged for those who intend to take leading positions as Chemists 
in Coal Tar Colour Works, Calico Printing Works, Dye Works, etc., 
and students, here, have the opportunity of preparing, in quantities 
sufficient for practical purposes, the more important materials used in the 
manufacture of coal tar products, colours, pigments, etc., and also of 
engaging in technical organic research work. 

These courses are not designed for the instruction of dyers and printers, 
such as is given in the Technical School, and are only open to graduates or 
students who have passed through an extended Course of Organic Chemistry 
in the Schorlemmer Laboratory, or elsewhere. 

In view of the demand for highly trained organic chemists in works, 
and of the impossibility of acquiring the necessary training within the limits 
of the ordinary degree course, Mr. I. Levinstein offers an annual exhibition 
of 50 to enable students who have passed through the ordinary three years' 
course, and shown originality in chemical research during their fourth year, 
to work a fifth year in the Technical Organic Laboratory. 

EVENING CLASSES. Lectures. The lecture courses are as follows : 
(i.) The History of Chemistry down to 1825 (i hr.) ; (ii.) Physical Chemistry 
(I hr.). 

Laboratory Courses. The ordinary course (3 hrs. twice a week) 
extends over three years, and follows, roughly speaking, the lines of the 
day courses ; students are, however, allowed to pursue any particular line of 
work under the supervision of the demonstrators. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. Owing largely to the 
influence of Professor (now Sir Henry) Roscoe, a sum of .3,355 was raised 
by subscription for the erection of the laboratories in 1874, and in 1894 a 
further sum of ,2,400 was raised by the friends of the late Professor 
Schorlemmer, F.R.S., the first professor of organic chemistry in the College 
(and in England), for the erection of the Schorlemmer laboratory. The late 




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Mr. John Rylandsand Mr. C. F. Beyer both contributed large sums towards 
the maintenance of the laboratory in its early days. 

A Dalton Scholarship of the value of ^50 a year for two years is awarded 
annually for the best research done by a student in the laboratory. All 
students who have shown themselves capable of carrying out an investigation 
(under direction) may be appointed to research-studentships, which entitle 
the holders to work in the laboratories under reduced fees. Dr. H. E. 
Schunck, D.Sc., F.R.S., has made a benefaction to the College for the 
purpose of encouraging original research in Chemistry. The income 
arising from the Schunck endowment is, at present, used partly for pro- 
viding expensive material required for research work, partly in apparatus 
and assisting research-students, who would otherwise be unable to stay at 
College. There is also the Levinstein Exhibition of .50 in Higher 
Technical Chemistry awarded annually and the Woodiwis Exhibition of 
12, awarded annually. (See also pp. 140, 143, 144.) 

GENERAL REMARKS. During the last ten years the number of students 
working in the laboratories has been as follows : 

1890-1. 1891-2. 1892-3. 1893-4. 1894-5. 

120 157 180 198 203 

1895-6. 18967. 1897-8 1898-9. 

243 209 218 240 

The number of students attending lectures in the Department is about 
265. The increase must be put down in a great measure to the increasing 
demand for trained chemists in works, and, to a lesser extent, for trained 
teachers of chemistry. 

Before the establishment of the Victoria University, many of the best 
students passed the London examinations, and, between 1867 and 1883, 
the first place on the Honours list was taken ten times by an Owens 
student. 

The number of students who have taken Honours in Chemistry at 
the Victoria University since 1883 is 113, and during the present year 

M 



( 70 ) 

22 new students have entered for this school. Since 1883 12 have 
taken Honours in the subject at the London B.Sc. Examination. 

Of the places taken by former students, a record is being drawn up, 
but it is still imperfect. The post of Chief Chemist at Somerset House is 
occupied by one of the early Dalton scholars, Dr. T. E. Thorpe, F.R.S., 
who was for many years Professor at the Royal College of Science, South 
Kensington. Six chairs of chemistry at University Colleges (out of 13) 
those of Professors P. P. Bedson, D.Sc., F. Stanley Kipping, D.Sc., F.R.S., 
Arthur Smithells, B.Sc., H. Lloyd Snape, D.Sc., Sydney Young, D.Sc., 
F.R.S., and W. Carleton Williams, B.Sc. and a very large number of other 
important teaching posts, are now occupied by former students. 

The successive Directors of the Laboratories have always regarded the 
education of research-chemists as one of the chief functions of the Depart- 
ment, and many positions in chemical works are now filled by former 
students as research-chemists and managers, not only in England, but in 
the colonies. 

FORMER PROFESSORS AND DIRECTORS OF THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY. 
Appointed 1851. Sir EDWARD FRANKLAND, K.C.B., F.R.S. ; resigned 1857. 

(deceased 1899). 

1857. Sir HENRY ENFIELD ROSCOE, B.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S. ; 
resigned 1886; Emeritus Professor. 

FORMER PROFESSOR OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
Appointed Lecturer 1873, Professor 1874. CARL SCHORLEMMER, LL.D., F.R.S. ; deceased 1892. t 

FORMER DEMONSTRATORS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS IN CHEMISTRY. 

Appointed 1851. W. J. RUSSELL, Ph.D., F.R.S.; resigned 1853 (late Lecturer in Chemistry 
at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, late President of the Chemical Society). 

1853. C. J. TUFNELL ; resigned 1854. 

1854. B. W. GERLAND, Ph.D.; resigned 1855. 

1855. F. GUTHRIE, B.A., Ph.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1859 (deceased 1886). 
1859. W. DITTMAR, F.R.S. ; resigned 1861, re-appointed 1873, resigned 1875 

(late Professor at Anderson's College, Glasgow; deceased 1892). 



Appointed 1861. CARL SCHORLEMMER, appointed Lecturer in Organic Chemistry, 1873 (see 
above), t 

1869. T. E. THORPE, B.Sc., Ph.D., F.R.S. (Chief Chemist to the Department of 

Inland Revenue, President of the Chemical Society); resigned 1870. 

1870. FRANCIS JONES; resigned 1872 (now Science Master at the Manchester 

Grammar School). 
1872. HENRY ARTHUR SMITH; deceased 1872. 

1872. DANIEL STONE (Lecturer in the Medical School); resigned 1873. 

1873. W. CARLETON WILLIAMS, B.Sc. ; resigned 1883 (now Professor at University 

College, Sheffield). 

1873. HARRY GRIMSHAW; resigned 1875. 

1875. M. M. PATTISON MUIR, M.A. ; resigned 1877 (now Fellow and Praelector of 
Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge). 

1875. OSWALD WILKINSON; resigned 1876. 

1875. THOMAS CARNELLEY, D.Sc. ; resigned 1880 (late Professor in the Univer- 
sity of Aberdeen ; deceased 1890). 

1878. J. B. HANNAY ; resigned 1879. 

1879. P. P. BEDSON, D.Sc. ; resigned 1882 (now Professor in the Durham College 

of Science). 

1880. WATSON SMITH, F.I.C. ; resigned 1889 (now Editor of the Journal of t/ie 

Society of Chemical Indus try).\ 

1882. HARRY BAKER ; resigned 1888. 

1883. ARTHUR SMITHELLS, B.Sc.; resigned 1885 (now Professor in the Yorkshire 

College, Leeds). 

1883. W. BOTT, Ph.D.; resigned 1886 (now Director of the Government Tech- 
nical School, Singapore). 

1885. JULIUS B. COHEN, Ph.D. ; resigned 1891 (now Lecturer in the Yorkshire 
College, Leeds). 

1888. G. J. FOWLER, M.Sc. ; resigned 1896 (now Superintendent and Chemist 
to the Rivers Committee of the Manchester Corporation). 

1888. ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. ; resigned 1897 (now Chemist to the Jenner 
Institute of Preventive Medicine). 

1892. S. H. DA VIES, M.Sc.; resigned 1893. 

1894. BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A. ; resigned 1897 (now Science Master in Ack- 

worth School). 

1895. E. HAWORTH, D.Sc.; resigned 1898. 

1896. J. CROWTHER, A.R.S.M. ; resigned 1898 (now Lecturer in the Swansea 

Technical School), t 

1897. D. S. JERDAN, Ph.D., M.Sc., resigned 1899. 



( 72 ) 

FORMER LECTURERS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS 

IN METALLURGY. 

Appointed Honorary Demonstrator 1876. JAMES TAYLOR ; resigned 1878. 
Lecturer 1885. W. H. GARDNER; resigned 1888. 
Assistant Lecturer 1892. G. J. FOWLER, M.Sc. ; resigned 1896.! 
1896. J. CROWTHER, A.R.S.M. ; resigned 1898.! 

FORMER LECTURERS IN TECHNOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY. 
Appointed 1884. WATSON SMITH ; resigned 1889.! 

1889. ERNEST BENTZ; resigned 1893, re-appointed 1894, resigned 1896 (now 
Lecturer in the Royal Technical Institute, Salford). 

ZOOLOGY. 

STAFF. The teaching staff consists of the following : Beyer Professor 
of Zoology and Director of the Zoological Laboratory, SYDNEY J. 
HICKSON, D.Sc. (Lond.), M. A. (Camb.), F.R S. (Hon. Fellow of Downing 
College, Cambridge) (1894) ; Assistant Lecturers and Demonstrators, F. W. 
GAMBLE, D.Sc. (Viet.) (1893), and J. H. ASHWORTH, D.Sc. (Lond.) (1895). 

Two Natural History lecture-theatres are used in common by the 
Zoological, Botanical, and Geological Departments. The larger one (41 ft. 
by 27f- ft., and 27 ft. in height) has seats for no students; the smaller 
theatre (30 ft. by 23 ft., and 20 ft. in height) has seats for 63 students. 

The large laboratory at the top of the Beyer building is divided into 
two sections by swing doors, and is provided with two galleries. The 
south section is 41 ft. by 38 ft. and 30^ ft. high, and seats 53 students. 
The north section is 41 ft. by 17 ft., and seats 13 students. The galleries 
are 9 ft. above the laboratory floor, are each 55 ft. long, and seat 24 
students. The benches are 3 ft. 8 ins. wide, and the passage between the 
bench and the gallery railing 3 ft. 7 ins. wide. The research laboratory 
is 41 ft. by 17 ft., and 17 ft. high, and seats 8 students. In addition there 
are two private rooms, one for the professor and one for the demonstrators, 
a workshop for the steward, a tank room and a large store-room above the 
large laboratory and a diagram-room on the ground floor. 




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The staircase leading to the Zoological department communicates by 
swing doors with the Manchester Museum, the collections of which are 
accessible to the teaching staff and can be studied by the students. 

DAY CLASSES. The Elementary Biology course (Part I.: Zoology) is 
held in the winter months, October-March. The students attend three 
lectures of one hour each, and six hours' practical work, per week. 

The class of General Zoology of Invertebrata is also held in the winter 
session, and the students attend three lectures of one hour each, and six 
hours' or more practical work, per week. 

The classes of General Zoology of Vertebrata and Embryology are 
held in the summer months. Each class consists of three lectures of one 
hour each, and six or more hours' practical work, per week. 

Occasional lectures or courses of lectures are given to meet the require- 
ments of Honours students, and suitable practical work is provided for them. 

A considerable amount of research work has been done since the 
chair was founded. Most of the papers have been republished in the 
Studies from the Biological Laboratories of Owens College, 4 vols. 

The most pressing need is a studentship or fellowship to enable 
senior students to undertake research work after graduation. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The professorship is 
endowed under the Beyer Bequest. The only other endowment in this 
Department is the Marshall Library Fund (see p. 119). 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Appointed 1851. W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1879.! 

1879. A. MILNES MARSHALL, M.A., M.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. ; deceased 1893. 

FORMER DEMONSTRATORS AND ASSISTANT LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1872. S. MESSENGER BRADLEY, F.R.C.S. (Lecturer in the Medical School) ; 

resigned 1873.! 

1878. MARCUS M. HARTOG, M.A., D.Sc. ; resigned 1883.! 
1883. C. HERBERT HURST, Ph.D.; resigned 1895 (deceased 1898). 
1889. R. ASSHETON, M.A. ; resigned 1893. 
1895. M. D. HILL, B.A. ; resigned 1895 (now Science-Master at Eton College). 



( 74 ) 



BOTANY. 

STAFF. The staff consists of the following : Professor of Botany and 
Director of the Botanical Laboratory, F. E. WEISS, B.Sc. (Lond.), F.L.S. 
(Fellow of University College, London) (1892) ; Demonstrator and Assistant 
Lecturer, O. V. DARBISHIRE, M.A. (Oxford), Ph.D. (Kiel) (1898). 

ACCOMMODATION. The Natural History lecture-theatres are described 
on p. 72. The Botanical laboratory (27 ft. by 40 ft.), situated on the 
first floor of the Beyer wing, can accommodate 50 students. The large 
elementary class of about 70 students has, therefore, to be divided for 
practical work. 

DAY CLASSES. Three courses of lectures are given : 

(i.) The Elementary Biology course (Part II.: Botany) commences 
at the beginning of the Lent Term and lasts to the end of the Easter 
Term, and consists of 20 lectures during the Lent and 30 lectures during 
the Easter Term, with practical work in addition. It deals with the 
elements of Plant Biology and Physiology. A knowledge of the 
classification of plants is gained by the study of a selected number of 
types representative of different groups of the Vegetable Kingdom. 

(ii.) The Pharmaceutical Botany course covers much the same ground 
as (i.), but deals more extensively with the classification of plants and with 
the recognition of plants used in Materia Medica. This course commences 
in October and is carried on throughout the session. 

(iii.) The Senior Botany course, consisting of about 60 lectures, is 
carried on through the three terms, and is intended for students reading for 
the final B.Sc. Students for the Major Pharmaceutical Examination attend 
during the first two terms. 

Besides these three regular courses, lecture courses are given in 
Palaeobotany and in the geographical distribution of plants, and either an 
evening class or a Saturday morning class under the auspices of the 



( 75 ) 

University Extension Committee. These last two classes are largely 
attended by teachers. 

In connection with all courses of lectures, including the evening and 
Saturday Morning Courses, courses of laboratory work have been 
organised. 

Part of the practical work in connection with the senior course of 
Botany consists in physiological experiments illustrating the chief 
phenomena of the nutrition, the respiration, and the growth of plants, and 
the instruction in this branch is much hampered by the need of a green- 
house, and of a senior laboratory in which these experiments, requiring 
continuous observation for several days, can be carried on without the 
interruption caused by the other courses of practical work. 

The number of students working in the Botanical laboratory during 
the last three years has been as follows : 

1896-97 1897-98 1898-99 
90 96 98 

Considerable use is made of specimens from the Manchester Museum, 
both for illustrating the lectures and also in connection with the laboratory 
work. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. None. 

I 

FORMER PROFESSOR. 

Appointed 1851. W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1891; Emeritus Professor 
(deceased 1895).! 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS. 

Appointed 1872. LEO H. GRINDON (Lecturer in the Medical School); resigned 1873. 

1878. MARCUS M. HARTOG, M.A., D.Sc. ; resigned 1883 (now Professor in 

Queen's College, Cork).t 
1883. H. MARSHALL WARD, Sc.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1885 (now Professor in the 

University of Cambridge). 
1886. THOS. HICK, B.A., B.Sc. ; deceased 1896. 
1896. F. W. KEEBLE, M.A. ; resigned 1898 (now Lecturer on the Cambridge 

University Extension Scheme). 



( 76 ) 

GEOLOGY. 

STAFF. The staff consists of the following : Professor of Geology 
and Director of the Geological Laboratory, W. BOYD DAWKINS, M.A., 
F.R.S. (Hon. Fellow of Jesus College, Oxford) (1874)!; and Lecturer 
in Petrology and Assistant Lecturer in Geology, B. HOBSON, M.Sc. 
(Viet.) (1889) (').t 

ACCOMMODATION. The Natural History lecture-theatres are described 
on p. 72. 

The principal geological laboratory (41 ft. by 16^ ft.) has a north light, 
specially suitable for microscopical work, and will seat 38 students. It 
contains, for students' use, a collection of British fossils arranged strati- 
graphically ; a collection of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks ; 
cabinets of microscopical rock sections ; a set of petrographical microscopes ; 
a small departmental library ; and a collection of crystal models by Krantz. 

A smaller geological laboratory, 21 ft. by 18^ ft., adjoins the principal 
laboratory. 

The laboratory of Applied Geology (30 ft. by i8 ft.) will seat 30 
students, and is fitted up as an engineering drawing-room with the 
appliances necessary for preparing geological maps, plans and sections, 
and contains a collection of Geological Survey Maps. 

The Mineralogical laboratory (40 J ft. by 16^ ft.) is fitted up for the 
chemical, and optical examination of minerals. 

The Petrological preparation room (30 ft. by 18 ft.) devoted to the 
preparation of rock specimens. 

The students make constant use of the geological collections of the 
Manchester Museum, which is in the same building. 

DAY CLASSES. The following classes are given : (i.) Physical 
Geography, including Physiographical Geology and Geomorphology, 30 

(') Appointed Lecturer in Petrology, 1899. 



( 77 ) 

lectures with demonstrations; (ii.) Structural and Dynamical Geology, 30 
lectures with demonstrations ; (iii.) Stratigraphical Geology, 30 lectures with 
demonstrations; (iv.) Geology applied to Civil Engineering and Mining, 18 
lectures ; (v.) Applied Geology, special course lectures and demonstrations 
(3 hrs. per week) ; (vi.) Elementary Petrology, including so much of 
Mineralogy as is necessary for the study of rocks, 50 lectures with practical 
work in the determination and description of rock-making minerals and 
rocks, in hand-specimens, and under the microscope ; (vii.) An Advanced 
Course on Petrology for Honours students ; (vlii.) Elementary Palaeontology, 
50 lectures with practical work in the determination and description of the 
more important fossils ; (ix.) Advanced Palaeontology, 50 lectures with 
practical work ; (x.) Field Excursions for practice in geological mapping 
and section drawing. The department is well provided with geological 
maps and diagrams, and the extensive geological collection of the museum 
is made use of in teaching. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS : None. 

GENERAL REMARKS. It is contemplated, in the future, to develop 
the side of Applied Geology in its relation to Mining. 

An increase in the funds available for the purchase of Geological and 
Geographical Books is desirable. 

The work in the Department would be rendered much more effective 
could more time be devoted to field excursions. At present this cannot 
be done within the limits of the term without interference with the time 
assigned to other studies. One week in the vacation is now given to 
field excursions, and especially to geological surveying. 

FORMER PROFESSOR. 
Appointed 1851. \V. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1872.! 

FORMER LECTURER. 
Appointed 1872. W. BOYD DAWKINS, M.A., F.R.S. ; appointed Professor 1874.! 

N 



( 78 ) 

FORMER DEMONSTRATOR AND ASSISTANT LECTURER. 
Appointed 1887. PERCY F. KENDALL, F.G.S. ; resigned 1889 (now Lecturer in 
the Yorkshire College, Leeds). 

FORMER LECTURER IN MINERALOGY. 
Appointed 1871. C. A. BURGHARDT, Ph.D.; resigned 1898.! 

EDUCATION. 

(Including the Day Training College for Teachers in Elementary Schools.) 

The staff consists of the following : Professor of Education, H. L. 
WITHERS, M.A. (sometime Scholar of Balliol College, Oxford, late 
Principal of Borough Road Training College, Isleworth) (1899) ; Assistant 
Lecturer in Education and Tutor of the Day Training College (Depart- 
ment for Men), H. T. MARK, B.A. (Lond.), B.Sc. (Viet.) (1899) (') ; 
Mistress of Method in the Day Training College (Department for 
Women), Miss CATHERINE I. DODD (1892) ; Master of Singing, 
WALTER CARROLL, Mus.B. (Viet.) (1892) ; Medical Officer, R. T. 
WILLIAMSON, M.D. (Lond.) (1899)! ; a Teacher of Elocution and a 
Needlework Instructress. 

The Department of Education has, as its subject, the Theory and 
Practice of Education, and the History and Organization of Education 
treated generally, and also in relation to the training of teachers for 
their professional work. 

Under this Department are included two branches for the training of 
teachers for secondary schools and for the training of teachers for elementary 
schools. The latter branch, officially styled by the Education Depart- 
ment " The Manchester Day Training College," is at present far the larger. 

I. TRAINING OF TEACHERS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS. The Victoria 
University grants a Diploma for Teachers in Secondary Schools, for 
which students are prepared. 

(') Appointed Acting Master of Method in 1898. 



( 79 ) 

Candidates for the Diploma must be graduates of some University of 
the United Kingdom, and are required both to pass a written examination 
in the Theory, History, and Art of Education, and also a practical test 
in one or more of the subjects of the ordinary curriculum of secondary 
schools. Candidates are also required to have attended certain prescribed 
courses of lectures, to have spent 150 hours in practice in approved 
schools, and to have been present at an approved course of criticism 
lessons, not less than 25 in number. Under 'certain special conditions 
candidates may further offer themselves for a Diploma as teachers of 
special subjects. 

Details of the courses for the Diploma cannot be precisely given, as 
they are, at the date of printing, undergoing complete re-organization. 

It is hoped that, in course of time, the Department will be fully 
equipped by the addition of : 

(i.) An Education Library, to include the chief books of reference 
on the subject, English and Foreign, as well as representative periodicals. 

(ii.) A Museum of Education, to contain specimens of School 
Furniture and Apparatus, Maps, Diagrams, Time Tables, School Work, 
and anything else which may illustrate the visible part of education. 

(iii.) A Demonstration Room in which criticism lessons, and 
subsequent discussions, may be held. 

(iv.) One or more schools in organic connexion with the Department 
to illustrate modern methods of School-management and Teaching. 

It is further hoped to connect the work of the Department, not 
only with the training of future teachers, but also with the experiments 
of teachers actually engaged in education, and with the educational 
associations of the district. 

It is hoped that this Department will increase in magnitude and 
importance as the value of training for secondary schools becomes 
recognised. 

The College elects representatives on the governing bodies of the 
following Schools: Manchester High School for Girls; Giggleswick 



Grammar School ; Hulme Grammar School, Oldham ; Sedbergh Grammar 
School ; Morts' School Foundation, Leigh ; Stockport Grammar School ; 
Nether Knutsford Grammar School ; Lancaster Royal Grammar School ; 
Mottram-in-Longdendale Free Grammar School ; Hobson's Charity, 
Audenshaw. 

II. TRAINING OF TEACHERS FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS. The Manchester 
Day Training College for Elementary Schools consists of two 
sections, for men and women respectively, and is included in 
The Owens College. The Principal of the College is the " Official 
Correspondent " with the Education Department at Whitehall, and 
the Council of the College form the " Local Committee." They are 
advised by a Committee consisting of certain members of the Senate, 
the Tutor of the Women's Department, and a number of other ladies 
and gentlemen connected with education in the city, including the 
Chairmen of the Manchester and Salford School Boards. 

An essential feature in the Day Training College is that the 
students (except in a small number of special cases) are required to 
qualify for degrees in the Victoria University ; they have, therefore, to 
show by an entrance examination that there is a reasonable probability 
of their being able to do so. 

All students prepare for the Teachers' Certificate of the Education 
Department. 

The professional side of the Syllabus for this certificate is known 
technically as " Part I." The syllabus is arranged for a period of 
training of three years, and it embraces, besides the Theory, Art, and 
History of Education, a number of subjects which are considered in- 
dispensable for a teacher in an Elementary School, such as English 
Composition, Arithmetic, Vocal Music, and Drawing, and, in the case 
of women, Needlework. The course also includes attendance at 
Criticism Lessons and Practice in Schools. It is not, like the course for the 
Diploma, a post-graduate course, but is taken concurrently with the 



( 8i ) 

Degree course, which is accepted by the Education Department in lieu 
of Part II. of the Syllabus. 

The following courses are given : 

I. MEN'S DEPARTMENT (i.) Theory of Teaching : ist year's course 
(2 hrs.) ; 2nd year's course (including Special Educational Authors) (2 
hrs.) ; 3rd year's course (History of Educational Theories) (i hr.) ; 
(ii.) Arithmetic : ist year's course (i hr.) ; (iii.) Practical School Teaching 
for three weeks at the close of the session ending about the middle of 
July; (iv.) Theory of Music: ist year's course (i hr.), and 2nd year's 
course (i hr.). 



II. WOMEN'S DEPARTMENT. (i.) Theory of Teaching: ist year's 
course (including General and Special Method, Kindergarten Principles, 
Infant Schools) (2 hrs.) ; 2nd year's course (including Special Educational 
Authors) (2 hrs.) ; 3rd year's course (History of Educational Theories) 
(i hr.) ; (ii.) Criticism Lessons (2 hrs.) ; (iii.) ist and 2nd years' 
courses in Needlework, etc. (3 hrs.) ; (iv.) Practical School Teaching for 
three weeks at the close of the session ending about the middle of July ; 
Arithmetic, ist year's course (i hr.) ; Theory of Music and Singing: ist 
year's course (i hr.) ; 2nd year's course (i hr.). 

III. COMBINED CLASSES (MEN AND WOMEN). (i.) Outlines of Logic 
(10 lectures in ist year); (ii.) Psychology applied to Education (i hr. 
weekly in 2nd year); (iii.) Drawing (2 hrs. weekly in ist and 2nd 
years). 

The instruction in Drawing is given at the Municipal School of Art, 
by arrangement with the Technical Instruction Committee of the 
Manchester Corporation. 

The majority of the students obtain posts immediately on leaving 
College, in either Training Colleges for Teachers, Technical Schools, 
Pupil Teachers' Centres, or Elementary Schools. 



( 8' ) 

The number of students in the Day Training College has been as 
follows : 

1890-1. 1891-2. 1892-3. 1893-4. 1894-5. 1895-6. 1896-7. 1897-8. 1898-9. 
Men 25 49 50 44 34 38 31 34 48 
Women - 8 20 24 1 8 23 30 49 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. Mrs. Samuel Fielden has 
recently given i ,000 as a first step towards the endowment of the Chair. 

For details of two Exhibitions open to Students in this Department 
only, see p. 145. 

FORMER MASTER OF METHOD. 
Appointed 1891, W. T. GOODE, M.A. ; resigned 1898. 



LAW. 

STAFF. The staff consists of the following : Christie Professor of 
Law, ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B.C.L. (Late Stowell Fellow of 
University College, Oxford) (1898)! ; Professors of Law, W. A. COPINGER, 
LL.D. (Lambeth) (1892), and J.S. SEATON, M.A., B.C.L. (Oxford) (1892)! ; 
Reader in Common Law, T. F. BYRNE, B. A. (Dublin) (1887) ; Lecturer 
in Jurisprudence and Roman Law, ALEXANDER GRANT, M.A., B.C.L. (Late 
Fellow of All Souls' College, Oxford) (1892) ; Tutor in Law, LEONARD 
BOTTOMLEY, M.A. (Viet.), LL.D. (Lond.) (1899). 

The following courses are given : (i.) Jurisprudence (2 hrs. for 
one term) ; (ii.) Roman Law (2 hrs.) ; (iii.) The Law and Custom of 
the English Constitution (i hr.); (iv.) International Law (i hr.) ; 
(v.) Elementary English Law, including (a) Principles of the Law 
of Real Property (i hr.), (b) Principles of the Law of Personal Property 
(i hr.), and (c] Principles of the Law of Contracts, Torts, and the 
Domestic Relations (i hr.) ; and (vi.) Advanced English Law, including 
(a) Conveyancing (i hr.), (b) Equity (i hr.), and (c] Common Law (i hr.). 



( 83 ) 

A Tutorial class in English Law is also held once a week, at which papers 
of questions on the different branches of English Law are set, and written 
answers are sent in to the Tutor, who corrects and discusses them in the 
next succeeding class. For the convenience of students attending the 
English Law Classes, most of whom are articled clerks engaged during 
the day in the offices of the various solicitors to whom they are articled, 
these classes are held in the centre of the town at the Manchester Law 
Library, where a room is lent for that purpose by the Committee of the 
Library ; but, with this exception, the law lectures are given in the College 
buildings. 

In the early days of the College, the teaching of law was usually 
combined with the teaching of some other cognate subject, such as history 
or political economy, e.g. Mr. R. C. Christie, the donor of the Christie 
Library and Whitworth Hall, was for several years Professor of History 
and Political Economy as well as of Law ; and the late Mr. J. E. C. Munro 
was Professor of Political Economy as well as of Law. The Professorship 
of Jurisprudence and Law was held from 1869 to 1875 by the Right Hon. 
James Bryce, M.P. But the tendency towards specialization in all 
branches of knowledge has rendered it necessary in later years to separate 
the teaching of law from the teaching of other subjects. 

During the session 1899-1900, the total number of students attending 
the day classes in the Law Department was 52. Of these 22 were preparing 
for the Intermediate or the Final Examination of the Victoria University 
for the degree of LL.B. In addition to the day classes in law, which 
are intended mainly for students who are adopting law as a professional 
career, certain evening classes in Commercial Law are also held, which 
are intended for a wider circle of students, such as those engaged or 
interested in banking, accountancy, insurance, and the various other 
businesses to be found in a commercial centre like Manchester. During 
the present session, two series of evening lectures are being given : the 
first series is given at the College on Wednesday evenings, and consists 



( 84 ) 

of four short courses of five lectures each on the Law of Partnership by 
the Principal ; on Executors and Administrators by Professor Seaton ; on 
Principal and Agent by Mr. Byrne ; and on the Formation and Winding-up 
of Companies by Mr. Grant ; more than 60 students have entered for 
these courses. The second series is given in a room in the centre of 
the town, on Friday evenings, in connection with the Manchester and 
District Institute of Bankers, and consists of two short courses of five 
lectures each, by Professor Seaton, on Sale of Goods and on Bankruptcy; 
the average attendance at these lectures exceeds 100. 

The law teaching of the College is thus arranged so as to prepare 
students, (i) for the law degree examination of the Victoria and London 
Universities; (2) for the examinations of the Council of Legal Education, 
qualifying for Call to the Bar; (3) for the examinations of the Incorporated 
Law Society of England, qualifying for admission on the rolls as a Solicitor ; 
(4) for such examinations as those held for Accountants and Bankers in 
the branches of law which are required by students for accountancy and 
banking. It also provides instruction for those who take up some branch 
of legal study in connection with other subjects, such as history or 
philosophy. 

A room in the Christie Library is devoted to the Law Department, 
and contains the library of the late Professor Muirhead of Edinburgh, 
which was purchased by subscription, and also works purchased out of 
the benefaction of Mr. C. J. Darbishire and of grants made from time to 
time by the College. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1872, an endowment 
of ,6,238 was provided by subscriptions of members of the legal profession 
in Manchester and the neighbourhood and of others interested in the 
subject. Since 1888-9 an annual grant of ^100 from the Incorporated 
Law Society of the United Kingdom has been received through the 
medium of the Manchester Incorporated Law Association in aid of the 
expenses of the Law Department, and an annual addition of ,50 to this 



( 85 ) 

grant has been promised, together with an annual grant of ^50 from 
the Manchester Association. 

For Scholarships, etc., see p. 139. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Law and Jurisprudence. 
Appointed 1865. R. C. CHRISTIE, M.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1869.1 

Professor 1870. JAMES BRYCE, D.C.L. ; resigned 1875. (Sometime Chancellor of 
the Duchy of Lancaster.)! 
Law. 
Appointed 1875. ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B.C.L. ; resigned 1890. (Elected Principal 

1897, Christie Professor 1898.)! 
1882. J. E. CRAWFORD MUNRO, LL.D. ; resigned 1892 (deceased 1896).! 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
Appointed 1867. FREDERIC THOMPSON, M.A. ; resigned 1872. 

1867. JAMES BRYCE, D.C.L. ; appointed Professor 1870.! 

1872. ALBERT V. DICEY, Q.C., M.A., LL.D. ; resigned 1873 (now Professor in the 

University of Oxford). 

1872. THOMAS ERSKINE HOLLAND, M.A., D.C.L. ; resigned 1874 (now Professor 
in the University of Oxford). 

1872. ARTHUR WILSON, M.A. ; resigned 1873. 

1873. J. GUNNING MOORE, M.A. ; resigned 1874. 

1873. Sir W. RANN KENNEDY; resigned 1875 ( now a Judge in the High Court 

of Justice). 

1874. A. A. CLIVE, M.A. ; resigned 1875. 

1874. ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B.C.L. ; appointed Professor 1875.! 

1874. JOHN GENT, M.A. ; resigned 1882. 

1876. E. ROBERTSON, Q.C., M.A. ; resigned 1879. 

1876. JOHN LASCELLES, B.A. ; resigned 1877. 

1877. SAMUEL HALL, M.A. ; resigned 1878 (now Vice-Chancellor of the County 

Palatine). 

1878. ARTHUR F. LEACH, M.A. ; resigned 1880. 
1880. J. S. COTTON, M.A. ; resigned 1882. 

1880. J. K. BRADBURY, M.A. ; resigned 1883 (now County Court Judge, Bolton 

District). 

1881. G. H. EMMOTT, M.A., LL.B. ; resigned 1882 (now Professor in University 

College, Liverpool). 

O 



( 86 ) 

Appointed 1883. J. T. FOARD; resigned 1887. 

1884. J. M. ASTBURY, Q.C., M.A. ; resigned 1890. 

1884. G. W. HEYWOOD ; resigned 1885. 

1885. H. STAFFURTH ; resigned 1886. 

1886. A. E. STEINTHAL, M.A. ; resigned 1888. 

1888. J. S. SEATON, M.A., B.C.L. ; appointed Professor 1892. 
1892. F. E. BRADLEY, LL.D. ; resigned 1899. 

HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPOSITION. 
Lecturer, HENRY HILES, Mus.D. (Oxon.), F.R.C.O. (1881). 

CLASSES. The following courses are given : (i.) ist year's course, 
including Elementary Harmony, Part-writing for four voices, and portions 
of History of Music (2 hrs.) ; (ii.) 2nd year's course, including Harmony and 
Part-writing of all kinds, Forms of Composition, and History of Music ; 
(iii.) jrd year's course, including Counterpoint, Canon, Double Fugue, 
Orchestration, and Composition (2 hrs.). 

The courses were organized by the present Lecturer to meet the 
requirements for the University degrees in Music. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The lectureship is 
without any endowment. For details of the Hargreaves Exhibition, 

see. p. 141. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1873. Sir J. FREDERICK BRIDGE, Mus.D. (Oxon.); resigned 1875. 
1875. EDWARD HECHT ; deceased 1887. 

THE DEPARTMENT FOR WOMEN. 

Tutor, Miss EDITH C. WILSON (1883). 
Assistant Tutor, Miss ALICE M. COOKE, M.A. (Viet.) (sometime Jones 

Fellow of the Owens College) (1897)^ 

The Owens College was originally founded " for young persons of the 
male sex" (see p. 3), but the Acts of 1870 and 1871 gave it power to 



( 87 ) 

admit women. In 1874, a class of Professor Wilkins was formed specially 
for women, and 70 attended ; but this was treated merely as an experiment. 
In the session of 1875-6, women were admitted as students to the following 
courses : Comparative Philology, English Literature, Physics, and Political 
Economy. In 1877, in response to a memorial from the Manchester Asso- 
ciation for Promoting the Higher Education of Women (founded about 1870), 
asking for the teaching of women in the College, the Court of the College 
suggested the establishment of an independent College for Women, in which 
members of the College staff should be allowed to teach. In accordance 
with this suggestion, the Manchester and Salford College for Women was 
founded by subscription, and opened in October, 1877, the College supply- 
ing most, if not all, of the teachers, and officially appointing the Board 
of Examiners. 

The foundation of the Victoria University in 1880 changed the 
situation ; its degrees were open to women, but attendance at a College 
of the University was necessary to obtain them. After negotiations which 
lasted from 1880 to June, 1883, the Owens College agreed to take over 
the College for Women, the Committee of the latter agreeing to pay a 
sum of ^500 a year for five years towards the expenses. For some time 
after this, most of the classes were still held separately, a few only of the 
senior classes for men being opened to them. The only classes at present 
held separately for women are two classes in Latin, one in English 
Language, one in French, two in Mathematics, one in Physical Geography, 
two in Physics and Mechanics, and two in Chemistry. 

The special accommodation for this Department includes (i.) an office 
where registration takes place, and the Tutor can be consulted ; (ii.) a large 
common room, recently furnished very comfortably by the generosity of one 
of the Council ; (iii.) cloak-rooms ; (iv.) a large lecture-room at the disposal 
of Miss Dodd, the Mistress of Method in the Day Training College ; and 
(v.) some smaller rooms above. Additional accommodation is also tempo- 
rarily provided for women students in the building of the Manchester 



( 88 ) 

High School in Dover Street, where some of the lectures to women 
students are given. 

It is the intention of the College in the session 1900-1901 to admit 
women to courses of study which will prepare them for degrees and other 
qualifications in Medicine and Surgery. Arrangements including the 
provision of a separate Dissecting Room for women students are now 
being made. The Manchester Royal Infirmary will provide the necessary 
opportunities for clinical teaching. 

In the present session, 1899-1900, the number of registered women 
students at Owens College is 119. Of these about 84 are working for 
Degree courses of the Victoria University ; 50, including some graduates, 
are members of the Day Training College. 

174 women, all graduates, are now Associates of the College. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The following bene- 
factions have been received by the Department : In the year 
1884-85, .2,500 from the Manchester and Salford College for Women; 
in 1886, ,200 from the late Mrs. Robert Platt ; in 1887-8, a bequest of 
.10,000 from the late Mrs. Elizabeth Salisbury Heywood ; in 1893, a 
donation of 2,000 by Her Majesty the Queen, from the funds of the 
Duchy of Lancaster, and further donations of .2,050. 

Most of the Scholarships are open to men and women alike ; the Dora 
Muir Scholarship and Alice Fay Exhibition (see p. 145), founded recently, 
are tenable only by women. 



HIGHER COMMERCIAL EDUCATION. 

A scheme of higher commercial education has recently been drawn up 
by the College authorities after consultation with the Manchester Chamber 
of Commerce. Special courses (a) in the day, and (b) in the evening, are 
offered to students who, after receiving a good school education, wish to 




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( 89 ) 

prepare themselves for a commercial life by study of an advanced kind in 
certain special subjects. Certificates of proficiency will be awarded on the 
results of both day and evening courses. 

(a) Day Courses. The certificate course extends over two sessions. 
The first year's course includes (i.) at least one language (French, German, or 
Spanish) (3 hrs.) ; (ii.) Geography, general and commercial (2 hrs.) ; (iii. and 
iv.) Law and Economics (3 hrs. at least between the two subjects) ; (v.) a 
second language, or a History Class, or English Composition and Literature, 
or a Science to be approved. The second year's course includes (i.) at least 
one modern language, as above ; (ii.) Commercial Law (i hr. at least) ; (iii.) 
Economics and Economic History (2 hrs.) ; (iv.) optional subjects (3 hrs.). 

(b] Evening Courses. The following special lecture courses are offered 
in the evening in the Session 1899-1900 : 

Political Economy : (i.) Four short courses given in the College on 
Currency and Exchanges, Commercial Crises, British Com- 
mercial Policy, and Railway Rates, and (ii.) Outlines of 
Economic Theory (i hr.), given in the rooms of the Bankers' 
Institute, St. Ann's Street. 

Political Science. (i hr.), dealing with history of political ideas 
from Hooker to James and John Stuart Mill. 

Law (i.) Four short courses given in the College on Law of 
Partnership, Executors and Administrators, Principal and 
Agent, Formation and Winding up of Companies, and (ii.) 
ten lectures on (a) Sale of Goods, and (<5) Bankruptcy, given 
at the Memorial Hall, in connection with the Bankers' 
Institute. 

French. (i.) Intermediate Class (2 hrs.), including Translation, 
Oral work, and Commercial Correspondence, (ii.) Advanced 
Class (2 hrs.), including more difficult Translation and Oral 
work. 



( 90 ) 

German. (2 hrs.) including Translation, Correspondence, and 
Oral work. 

Spanish Literature. (i hr.). 
Italian Literature. (i hr.). 

Students in all the language classes are expected to have already 
obtained some knowledge of the language they take up. 

To obtain the certificate Students must (i.) attend lectures for not less 
than 3 hours a week during at least two sessions of the following subjects 
Economics and Political Science, Law, Modern Languages ; and (ii.) pass 
satisfactorily an examination in at least two of these subjects. 

As the number of students and the resources at the disposal of the 
College increase it is expected that this branch of its work will be greatly 
developed, and in particular that provision may be made for the study of 
Oriental Languages. By the assistance of several Manchester merchants and 
of the Lancashire County Council, and by the welcome co-operation of the 
Chamber of Commerce, this start has been made, and next session it is 
intended to make substantial additions, at all events to the Day Classes 
in subjects bearing on commercial life. 



UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COURSES, POPULAR LECTURES, 

AND EVENING CLASSES. 

I. UNIVERSITY EXTENSION COURSES : Two or three Victoria 
University Extension Courses are, as a rule, offered during each session. 

The courses for the session 1899-1900 are as follows: (i.) England 
an J Europe from the outbreak of the French Revolution to the Battle of 
Waterloo (8 lectures), by A. J. Sargent, B.A. ; (ii.) The Structure and 
Life of Plants as adapted to their surroundings (10 lectures), by Professor 



Weiss; (iii.) The Habits and Structure of Animals (10 lectures), by 
F. W. Gamble, D.Sc. 

The last two courses, specially intended for Teachers, were given on 
Saturday mornings, 9.30-10.30 a.m. and followed by a class 10.30-11 and 
by practical work in the laboratory 11-12.30. 

II. POPULAR LECTURES. From 1892-310 1898-9 a series of Popular 
Lectures on various subjects were given on Monday evenings. The 
Lectures were temporarily discontinued during the present session, 1899- 
1900. 

The following are the courses oflectures for the session 1899-1900 : (i.) 
A course of eight lectures on Shakspere, by Oliver Elton, M.A. ; (ii.) A 
course of ten lectures on Egyptian Hieroglyphics, by F. Llewelyn 
Griffith, M.A. (in continuation of courses given for the first time in 1898-9) ; 
(iii.) A course of three lectures (free) on Commercial Crises, by Professor 
Flux ; (iv.) Two lectures, on " Manchester under Lords of the Manor," 
by James Tail, M.A., given under the Warburton Trust. 

III. EVENING CLASSES. {For a history of the evening classes see 
pp. 5, 6). In addition to the evening classes in French (see p. 89), German 
(see p. 90), Commercial Law (see p. 89), specially intended for the Higher 
Commercial Education Scheme, the following are given : 

(i.) Spanish Literature (i hr.), given by W. T. Alvarez. 
(2.) Italian Literature (i hrs.), by A. Valgimigli. 
(3.) Political Science (i hr.), by A. E. Taylor, M.A. 

(4.) Mathematics; (i.) Analytical Plane Geometry (i hr.) (and ii.) 
Differential and Integral Calculus (i hr.), by F. T. 
Swanwick, M.A. 

(5.) Physics: (i.) Higher Technical Electricity (i hr. lecture, with 
2 hrs. practical work) and (ii.) Advanced Practical Physics 
(2 hrs.). 



( 92 ) 

(6.) Engineering: (i.) Civil Engineering (i hr.), (ii.) Mechanical 
Engineering (i hr.) and (iii.) Laboratory Class (2^ hrs.). 

(7.). Chemistry : (i.) History of Chemistry (i hr.), by W. A. Bone, 
D.Sc., Ph.D. ; (ii.) Physical Chemistry (i hr.), by E. J. Russell, 
B.Sc. ; (iii.) Laboratory Classes (3 hrs. twice weekly), 
arranged to form a four years' course. 

The Special Lecturers in the Evening Classes Department are 

LECTURER IN SPANISH. 
Appointed 1874. W. T. ALVAREZ. 

LECTURER IN ITALIAN. 
Appointed 1884. AZEGLIO VALGIMIGLI. 




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( 93 ) 



VIL-The Medical Department. 



Dean of the Medical School Professor A. H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. 
(i88 5 ).t 

For the history of Department, see pp. i, 2, 6, 8, 14, 17, 22, 30. The 
Department includes three sub-departments besides the general department, 
viz., the Pharmaceutical Department, the Dental Department, and the 
Department of Public Health. 

The courses in the general department prepare for the degrees of the 
Victoria University and the diplomas of other examining boards. 

There is a large Medical Museum shared by the several departments. 

In the Medical Department, the academic year is divided into a winter 
session lasting from October to March, and a summer session lasting from 
May to July. The majority of courses extend over one of these sessions only. 

FORMER DEANS. 

Appointed 1872. Professor GEORGE SOUTH AM, F.R.C.S. ;(') resigned 1875. t 
1875. Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1884. t 
1884. Professor MORISON WATSON, M.D., F.R.S. ; deceased 1885. t 



PHYSICS, CHEMISTRY, ZOOLOGY, AND BOTANY. 

Medical Students receive instruction in these subjects in the Science 
Departments of the College. Where special courses are provided for 
Medical Students, these have been mentioned. Physiological Chemistry 
is taught in the Department of Physiology. 

(') Professor SOUTHAM'S title was " Director of Medical Studies." 



( 94 ) 



ANATOMY. 

The staff consists of the following : Professor of Anatomy, ALFRED 
H. YOUNG, M.B.(Edin.), F.R.C.S. (1885)!, Demonstrators, PETER THOMPSON, 
M.D., (Viet.) (1895), H. H. BROOME, M.B., C.M. (Edin.) (1898), and 
W. WRIGHT, M.B., Ch.B. (Viet.) (1899). 

ACCOMMODATION. The department includes the following rooms : (i.) 
The lecture theatre, seating 180 students; (ii.) the demonstration theatre, 
with accommodation for 100 students ; (iii.) a large room for Osteology 
(39 ft. by 38 ft.) ; (iv.) the Dissecting Room, lit by electricity (78^ ft. by 
32 ft.) ; (v.) a room for special work ; (vi.) the Professor's Room ; (vii.) the 
Demonstrators' Room ; (viii.) preparation rooms. A large portion of the 
Medical Museum is also reserved for Anatomy. 

CLASSES. Lectures. The following courses are given : (i.) A course 
on Descriptive Anatomy (5 hrs., winter session) given by the Professor, and 
(ii.) special classes for junior and senior students given by the Demonstrators. 
Practical Demonstrations on Regional Anatomy are given three days weekly 
during the winter session and two days weekly during the summer session. 

PRACTICAL WORK. The Dissecting Room is open to students through- 
out the session from 9.30 to 4.30 p.m. The practical course is under the 
immediate superintendence of the Professor, assisted by the Demonstrators. 

SPECIAL BENEFACTIONS AND ENDOWMENTS. None. 

FORMER PROFESSOR. 
Appointed 1874. MORISON WATSON, M.D., F.R.S. ; deceased 1885.! 

FORMER LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872. EDWARD LUND, F.R.C.S. ; resigned 1873 (appointed Professor of 

Surgery 1874)^ 
Lecturer 1872. S. MESSENGER BRADLEY; deceased 1875.! 




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( 95 ) 

Appointed Lecturer and Medical Tutor 1873. J- BESWICK PERRIN ; resigned 1874. 

Demonstrator 1876. A. H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. ; resigned 1880 (appointed 

Professor 1885).! 

1878. ALEXANDER FRASER, M.B., C.M. ; resigned 1883 (now 
Professpr in the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland). 

1880. J. MACDONALD BROWN, M.B. ; resigned 1881. 

1881. W. E. HOYLE, M.A., M.R.C.S., resigned 1883 (now Director 
of the Manchester Museum), t 

1882. JOSEPH COLLIER, M.B., F.R.C.S. ; resigned 1885 (now Assistant 

to the Lecturer on Practical Surgery), t 

1883. A. M. PATERSON, M.D. ; resigned 1888 (now Professor in 
University College, Liverpool), t 

1885. A. ROBINSON, M.D. ; resigned 1896 (now Lecturer at the 

Middlesex Hospital). 

1888. J. W. SMITH, F.R.C.S.; resigned iSgr. 
1891. A. J. CHALMERS, M.D., F.R.C.S. ; resigned 1894. 
1896. N. H. ALCOCK, M.A., M.D. ; resigned 1897. 
1898. A. B. SMALLMAN, M.B., Ch.B. ; resigned 1898. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY. 

The staff consists of the following : Brackenbury Professor, WILLIAM 
STIRLING, M.D., D.Sc. (Edin.) (1886) ; Demonstrators, I. WALKER HALL, 
M.B., Ch.B. (Viet.) (1898), and CHARLES GARNER, M.B., Ch.B. (Viet.) 
(1899). 

ACCOMMODATION. The department contains the following rooms, dis- 
tributed on three floors : Ground floor, (i.) The Lecture Theatre (60 ft. 
by 38 ft. by 27 ft. in height) is capable of seating 400 students ; the lecture 
table is fitted with a water-motor so as to be able to show experiments with 
recording apparatus ; behind the lecture table is a special arrangement for 
the exhibition of diagrams and a screen for projections by means of the 
electric or oxyhydrogen light. Adjacent to the lecture theatre are (ii.) a 
room (31 ft. by 13 ft.) for the preparation of lecture experiments ; (iii.) 
a Museum (30 ft. by 23 ft.) for the storage of apparatus ; and (iv. and v.) two 



( 96 ) 

rooms (23 ft, by 11 ft. and 12 ft. by 12 ft.) for the storage of lecture 
apparatus, diagrams, and models, (vi.) The laboratory for Physiological 
Chemistry (40 ft. by 30 ft.) is fitted with benches to accommodate 50 students 
at a time, each student having a separate set of reagents and apparatus. There 
are also (vii.) a small chemical store-room, and (viii.) a work-shop (16 It. 
by 1 1 ft.), fitted with a motor, lathe, etc., where apparatus can be made and 
repaired. First floor. This is set apart for Experimental Physiology. The 
experimental laboratory for Practical Classes (ix.) (40 ft. by 30 ft.) is fitted 
up with fifteen sets of recording apparatus, worked from shafting by 
a motor in the basement, and placed on separate tables, for the 
recording of muscular contractions, the beating of the heart, etc. 
Students generally do this work in pairs. A pendulum myograph is fixed 
to one wall. A second set of places is arranged for experiments 
requiring non-recording apparatus. Adjacent to this laboratory is (x.) an 
Experimental Research Laboratory (32 ft. by 23 ft.), fitted with a large 
recording kymograph of Hering's pattern, motor, recording drums, and 
the usual apparatus. There are also on the same floor (xi.) the 
Professor's private room; (xii.) a small private laboratory (18 ft. by 
16 ft.); (xiii.) a room (16 ft. by 10 ft.) set apart for the Platt Physio- 
logical Library ; (xiv.) an optical room (30 ft. by 26 ft.) ; (xv.) a photo- 
graphic room (13 ft. by 8 ft.) ; and (xvi.) a room (16 ft. by 13 ft.) fitted up 
for gas analysis and for the use of the ophthalmoscope and laryngoscope. 
On the Second floor is (xvii.) the large Histological Laboratory (94 ft. by 
34 ft.), with seats for 120 on the floor area, and room for about 40 in the 
gallery which runs round the room (see illustration). Each student is provided 
with a bench with water and gas supply, the usual histological reagents, and a 
locker for his microscope. Paraffin baths and various forms of microtome 
are arranged at suitable places in the room. One part of the gallery is used 
for microscopical demonstrations, the rest is set apart for students " mount- 
ing ' and " ringing" the microscopical slides prepared in the class. A small 
preparation room (xviii.), and a room for the storage of microscopes (xix.), 
open from the large laboratory. There are also on this floor (xx.) the 



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Demonstrators' room, (xxi.) a laboratory for histological research (34 ft. by 
23 ft.), and (xxii.) a balance room. 

LECTURES. A General course (5 hrs. weekly, winter session), and 
special courses on Advanced Physiology are given. 

LABORATORY COURSES. These consist of (i.) a course on Practical 
Physiology (two afternoons weekly during the winter session), given in the 
laboratories for Experimental Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, and 
(ii.) a course on Practical Histology (7^ hrs. during the summer session), 
given in the Histological Laboratory. 

The laboratories are also open to students working for the higher 
University Examinations, and to those intending to prosecute original 
research in the subject. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The Chair is endowed 
with a sum of ,5,000, given by Miss Hannah Brackenbury. 



One of the Platt Scholarships of 50 a year, tenable for two years, 
founded by the late Robert Platt, Esq., is offered annually, on condition 
that the scholar shall devote himself to original research in Physiology or 
the related sciences. The scholar must pass the first year of his tenure at 
the Owens College ; the second may be spent in any other approved 
European laboratory. A Sidney Renshaw Exhibition (the interest of 
,500 for one year), founded by Dr. J. W. Renshaw in memory of his son, 
and two Platt Exhibitions of about ^15 each, are also offered annually. 
(See also p. 142.) 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872, Professor 1873. WILLIAM SMITH, F.R.C.S. ; deceased 1875. 

1873. ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., F.R.S., ; resigned 1885 ; Emeritus Professor, t 

FORMER LECTURER IN HISTOLOGY. 
Appointed 1884. W. H. WATERS, M.A. ; deceased 1887.! 



( 98 ) 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS IN PHYSIOLOGY. 
Appointed 1876. JOHN PRIESTLEY, M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1879. 
1882. W. H. WATERS, M.A. ; deceased 1887. t 
1884. GEORGE J. HASLAM, M.D. ; resigned 1887. 
1887. G. N. STEWART, M.A., M.D., D.Sc. ; resigned 1889 (now Professor in the 

Western Reserve University, Ohio). 

1887. A. F. S. KENT, M.A. ; resigned 1889 (now Professor at University College, 
Bristol). 

1889. A. CLARKSON, M.B., C.M. ; resigned 1890. 

1890. J. S. EDKINS, M.A., M.B. ; resigned 1892 (now Lecturer at St. Bartholomew's 
Hospital). 

1890. J. A. MENZIES, M.D. ; resigned 1895 (accepted temporary re-appointment 

1898-9). 

1893. R. M. HORNE, M.D. ; deceased 1896. 
1896. C. F. MYERS-WARD, M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1898 (now Lecturer at University 

College, Sheffield). 
1896. J. A. MILROY, M.A., M.B. ; resigned 1898 (now Demonstrator at the 

Yorkshire College, Leeds). 



MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY, AND 
THERAPEUTICS. 

This department provides for the education of (i) Medical Students, 
and (2) Pharmaceutical Students. 

THE STAFF. The staff consists of following : Professor of Materia 
Medicaand Therapeutics, D. J. LEECH, M.D.(Lond.), D.Sc.(Vict), F.R.C.P. 
(i88i)f ; Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in Pharmacology, R. B. 
WILD, M.D. (Lond.), M.Sc. (Viet.), M.R.C.P. (1890)! ; Lecturer in Pharma- 
cognosy, W. KIRKBY (1891) ('); Assistant Lecturer in Pharmacy, J. GRIER 
(1896). 

ACCOMMODATION. There are three laboratories: (i) A Pharma- 
ceutical Laboratory for the teaching of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical 

(') Mr. Kirkby was appointed Assistant Lecturer in Pharmacy in 1890. 



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( 99 ) 

Chemistry to medical students. This is provided with benches and other 
fittings like an ordinary chemical laboratory, and accommodates about 24 
students. On one side of the room is a complete collection of all official 
preparations. The laboratory contains all the apparatus necessary for 
the pharmaceutical examination and complete analysis of drugs. 

(2) A second Laboratory, fitted up like the first, is chiefly used by 
pharmaceutical students and also by those engaged in pharmacological and 
chemical investigations. There is in this room a water-motor, which drives 
a centrifuge and recording drums. 

(3) A Pharmacological Laboratory divided into two rooms, one for the 
private use of the Professor and Assistant Lecturer, and the other for 
research students. This latter laboratory contains the ordinary apparatus 
for pharmacological research clockwork drums, drums driven by an 
electro-motor, apparatus, including Kobert's ovens, for investigation of the 
action of drugs on muscle and nerve, the heart and vessels, and other 
organs of the body. 

In the Professor's laboratory there is a small departmental library 
and a dark room for preparing photographs for diagrams and lantern 
demonstrations. 

On the ground floor of the Medical Department of the College is a 
large museum devoted chiefly to the exhibition of typical specimens of 
officinal drugs, and containing also a collection of organic and inorganic 
materia medica specimens, accessible to all students, and a collection of 
between two and three thousand specimens of Indian and Colonial drugs, 
arranged so as to be accessible for reference. 

LECTURE COURSES.- These include: (i) A course of Pharmacology and 
Therapeutics, consisting of five lectures weekly during May, June, and July, 
given by the Professor ; (2) A course on Materia Medica to medical 
students, of four lectures weekly in May, June, and July ; (3) A course on 
Materia Medica, with practical instruction in the histological examination 
of drugs, for pharmaceutical students, given once weekly during nine months 



each year ; (4) A course on Pharmacy, for pharmaceutical students, given 
twice weekly for nine months in each year ; and (5) A course of lectures 
in Pharmaceutical Chemistry once weekly for the same time, by the 
Assistant- Lecturer in Pharmacy. A course on Pharmacy Law is also 
given from time to time. 

LABORATORY COURSES. ( i ) During the summer session, demonstrations 
of the methods employed to ascertain the action of Drugs are given in the 
laboratory, to the members of the class in pharmacology, by the Professor 
and Assistant Lecturer (voluntary) ; (2) A course of practical demonstrations 
in Pharmacy (special fee) once weekly during the session is offered to all 
students who desire to take it ; this is conducted by the Assistant Lecturer 
in Pharmacy and includes the practical instruction in the detection of the 
impurities of drugs ; (3) A course of practical instruction one day in each 
week during the summer session is given to students attending the class 
in Materia Medica, each making for himself typical preparations ; (4) 
Practical classes in Dispensing, for medical students, are given three times 
a year ; each class meets twice weekly during three months ; students 
are taught how to prescribe all the ordinary drugs and to detect their 
ordinary adulterations ; (5) The Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological 
Laboratories are open each day from 9.30 to 5.30, to students working 
at pharmaceutical chemistry and to those who are engaged in special 
investigations. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. None. 

FORMER LECTURERS IN MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 

Appointed 1872. ALEX. SOMERS. M.R.C.S. ; deceased 1881. 

1874. D. J. LEECH, M.D., F.R.C.P. ; appointed Professor i88i.f 

FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS IN PHARMACY. 

Appointed 1883. W. ELBORNE, M.A. ; resigned 1889. 
1891. J. H. HOSEASON; resigned 1896. 




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PATHOLOGY, MORBID ANATOMY, AND BACTERIOLOGY. 

The staff consists of the following : Procter Professor of Pathology and 
Morbid Anatomy, and Director of the Pathological Laboratory, A. SHERIDAN 
DELEPINE, M.B., C.M. (Edin.), B.Sc. (Lausanne) (1891) ; Assistant 
Lecturer and Demonstrator in Pathology, F. C. MOORE, M.D., M.Sc. 
(Viet.) (1896) ; Demonstrator in Bacteriology, E. J. SIDEBOTHAM, M.A., 
M.B. (Camb.) (1897). The Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in 
Pathology is also Pathologist to the Royal Infirmary, where the teaching 
of Morbid Anatomy is partly conducted. 

SPECIAL STAFF FOR THE PUBLIC HEALTH WORK. In addition to the 
above members of the teaching staff, the following gentlemen are regularly 
engaged in the investigation of products for sanitary authorities : 
J. R. CARVER, M.D. (Camb.) (1898); F. J. H. COUTTS, M.D. (Viet.) 
(1899). 

ACCOMMODATION. A lecture-room (50 ft. by 38 ft.) fitted with suitable 
arrangements for the projection of photographs, etc., on the screen, is 
used in common for this and several other subjects. The following rooms 
are used for practical work : 

FOR MORBID ANATOMY (Teaching and Research). (i.) A large room 
(38 ft. by 23 ft.) for preparation of museum specimens ; (ii.) A gallery in the 
Medical Museum for the collection of morbid specimens, of which there are 
about 3,000 ; (iii.) The Morbid Histology Laboratory (78 ft. by 22 ft. ; see 
illustration) in which accommodation can be found for 90 students, each 
of whom is provided with water, sink, and cupboard, etc., and the necessary 
reagents for histological research ; (iv.) A private research laboratory for 
the Assistant Lecturer. 

FOR BACTERIOLOGY (Teaching and Research). (v.) The Bacteriological 
Laboratory, 60 ft. by 23 ft., which can accommodate 25 students. Incubators 
for the special use of students, exhaust pumps, and the apparatus necessary for 

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( 102 ) 

carrying out bacteriological work, are of easy access, (vi.) An incubating 
chamber for research work (9 ft. by 8 ft.) communicating with the main 
laboratory through an ante-chamber. The incubating room is ventilated by 
air kept at a constant temperature of 22 C., by being made to pass through 
a coil heated by a gas jet regulated by a metallic heat-regulator. 
In summer the air is cooled by circulating water when the external 
temperature is above 20 C. A series of incubators, kept at tem- 
peratures varying from 20 to 68 C., are arranged in five recesses, 
each provided with separate gas supply, an independent flue, and with 
arrangements for circulating cold water when necessary. The partitions 
between the recesses are made of two sheets of metal separated by 
asbestos packing. (vii.) A room for sterilizing apparatus and preparing 
media also communicates with the large Bacteriological Laboratory. Cur- 
rent steam sterilizers and a Chamberland autoclave are kept in a large 
closet with a flue for the removal of steam. A large current steam sterilizer, 
heated by a powerful Swedish petroleum furnace, is used for the rapid 
sterilization of large pieces of apparatus, (viii.) A room 30 ft. by 13 ft., 
provided with large draught closets, etc., is specially intended for Patho- 
logical Chemistry, and is at present utilised by the assistants engaged in 
Public Health work, (ix.) A small private research laboratory used chiefly 
by the Demonstrator of Bacteriology, (x.) A room 19 ft. by 7 ft. by n ft., 
in the basement, with bare brick walls, concrete floor, and no other opening 
than a well-fitting door, is reserved for experiments on the disinfection of 
rooms. 

FOR EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY, ETC. (xi.) A small experimental 
room 33 ft. by 12 ft., in which the recording and photographic apparatus 
are kept, directly connected with the laboratories for Bacteriology and 
Morbid Histology, (xii.) The dark photographic room (8 ft. by 10 ft.), 
communicating with the last room, (xiii.) A series of rooms for inoculation 
experiments, (xiv.) An engine room, containing a Crossley gas engine, 
and a 100 volt generator dynamo (both presented to the Department by 



Mr. Wm. Crossley), also a Gartner centrifugal machine driven by electricity, 
and a Runne's centrifugal machine driven by a Robinson hot-air engine, 
(xv.) A large work room and store room, in which refrigerators are also kept, 
(xvi.) A departmental consulting library, and (xvii.) the Professor's private 
room, are on the same floor as the Bacteriological Laboratory. (With 
the exception of the lecture theatre, preparation room, and museum, the 
various rooms comprising the Pathological Department are on three floors 
and connected together by a special staircase.) 

LECTURES. The following courses are held : (i.) On General 
Pathology and Morbid Anatomy (5 hrs., winter session) ; (ii.) Practical 
Morbid Histology (2 afternoons a week, from May to July) ; (iii.) Practical 
Bacteriology as applied to Medicine and Public Health (2 afternoons weekly, 
given twice a year, from October to December and from May to July) ; 
(iv.) Practical Pathology and Microscopy, including meat inspection (2 after- 
noons weekly, from January to March) ; (v.) Demonstrations on Morbid 
Anatomy and Histology are given twice a week during the winter and 
summer sessions ; (vi.) Post-graduate courses on recent advances of 
Pathology are given from time to time ; (vii.) Special instruction in 
advanced Bacteriology and Pathological Chemistry for those engaged in 
research. 

SPECIAL FEATURES IN THE PRESENT WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT. For 
the last eight years the most distinctive feature of the work of the Department 
has been the systematic application of pathological research to the prevention 
of disease. The various methods of diagnosis based on bacteriological 
discoveries have been carefully tested, and in some cases improved, with the 
view of securing the utmost accuracy and rapidity of results. The relations 
of water, soil, foods (especially milk), and tuberculosis of the lower animals, to 
certain human diseases, have received much attention. Methods of steril- 
ization and disinfection have also been specially studied. As a result of this 
work, the Director of the Pathological Laboratory has, since 1892, been in 
the position to assist considerably the Sanitary Authorities of Manchester, 



( 104 ) 

Salford, and neighbouring districts. Since 1895 the Council of the College 
has sanctioned the establishment of official relations between the 
Pathological Department and various Sanitary Authorities.(') This was one 
of the first instances in England of co-operation between the Pathological 
Laboratory of a University College and the Public Health Authorities of 
the district. 

The growth of this Department in Manchester may be gauged by 
the number of reports issued yearly since 1895 to various Sanitary 
Authorities, and more especially to the Manchester Public Health Depart- 
ment. 

The number of reports issued were as follows: In 1896, over 300; 
in 1897, over 1,500; in 1898, over 2,500; in 1899, over 3,000. 

These reports have related chiefly to suspected cases of Diphtheria, 
Typhoid Fever, Asiatic Cholera, Plague, Anthrax, Rabies, Tuberculosis, 
Epidemic Diarrhoea, Food Poisoning, etc. Diseased foods, milk supplies, 
water supplies, filtration of water, contamination of soil, disinfection 
methods, have also been the subject of several investigations. 

In Manchester, owing to the administrative methods adopted by 
Dr. Niven, 911 out of 948 cases suspected of being affected with 
Typhoid, i.e., 96 per cent, of all cases occurring during the year 1898, 
were submitted to bacteriological examination, with results that testified 
fully to the accuracy and value of the methods employed. 

The Department is capable of great development, both on its purely 
pathological and its bacteriological side. On the pathological side it needs 
special endowments for research, and it is felt that bacteriology has now 
acquired so many important industrial applications besides its medical 
ones (e.g., in brewing, dairy-work, sewage treatment, etc.), that there 
should be established a Bacteriological Institute, similar to the Physical 
Institute, with special laboratories in connection with the Departments 

(') Over 50 Sanitary Authorities are now officially connected with the Department for 
the investigation of cases of infectious disease, etc. 



of Public Health, Forensic Medicine, Chemistry, and Botany, the present 
Bacteriological Department serving as a central nucleus. (See also under 
the Department of Public Health, p. in.) 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. In 1889-90 the sum 
of ^6,000 was given by the Legatees of the late Daniel Procter, Esq., 
towards the endowment of the professorship. There are no Scholarships 
or Fellowships in this Department. 

FORMER PROFESSORS AND LECTURERS. 
Appointed Lecturer 1876. HENRY SIMPSON, M.D.; resigned i88i.t 

Lecturer 1876. JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., F.R.C.P. ; appointed Professor 
1 88 1 ; appointed Professor of Medicine, 



FORMER ASSISTANT LECTURERS AND DEMONSTRATORS. 
Appointed 1884. ROBERT MAGUIRE, M.D., M.R.C.P.; resigned 1885 (now Lecturer at 

St. Mary's Hospital, London). 
1885. THOMAS HARRIS, M.D.; resigned 1892 (now Lecturer on Diseases of the 

Respiratory Organs), t 

1889. R. B. WILD, M.D.; resigned 1890 (now Assistant Lecturer and Demon- 
strator in Pharmacology), t 

1891. E. GOODALL, M.D.; resigned 1891. 

1892. T. N. KELYNACK, M.D. ; resigned 1899 (now Assistant to the Professor 

of Medicine).f 

MEDICINE. 

The staff consists of the following : (i.) Professor of Medicine, JULIUS 
DRESCHFELD, M.D. (Wurzburg), B.Sc. (Viet.), F.R.C.P. (1891) (')f ; Assist- 
ant Lecturer, R. T. WILLIAMSON, M.D., B.S. (Lond.), F.R.C.P. (i899)( 2 )f ; 
Assistant, T. N. KELYNACK, M.D. (Viet.) (1899)! ; (ii.) Lecturers on 
Clinical Medicine, Professor JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., F.R.C.P.,f and 
GRAHAM STEELL, M.D. (Edin.), F.R.C.P (1884)^ 

(') Dr. Dreschfeld was appointed Lecturer on Clinical Medicine in 1884 ; see also above 
(") Dr. Williamson was appointed Assistant in 1892. 



( 106 ) 

The courses are as follows : (i.) A General course (2 hrs. extending 
over two years, winter session) ; (ii.) a course on Diseases of the Nervous 
System ; (iii.) Demonstrations on the Examination of Blood and Urine. 
Clinical Lectures are given (i hr.) throughout the session at the Infirmary. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. For details of the Turner 
Medical Scholarship, see p. 142. 

FORMER PROFESSORS OF MEDICINE. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872, Professor 1873. Sir WILLIAM ROBERTS, M.D., F.R.S.('); resigned 

1887 ; Emeritus Professor (deceased 1899). 
Lecturer 1872, Professor 1873. J. E. MORGAN, M.D., F.R.C.P.; resigned 1891 ; 

Emeritus Professor (deceased 1892). 
Lecturer 1884, Professor 1889. JAMES Ross, M.D., LL.D., F.R.C.P. ; deceased 

1892. 

FORMER LECTURERS ON CLINICAL MEDICINE. 

The former Professors of, Medicine, and the following : 

Appointed Lecturer 1884. Professor D. J. LEECH, M.D., F.R.C.P. ; resigned 1899.! 
1884. HENRY SIMPSON, M.D.; resigned 1889. t 



SURGERY. 

The staff consists of the following : Professor of Systematic Surgery, 
T. JONES, M.B., B.S. (Lond.), F.R.C.S. (1892)1; Assistant, W. 
THORBURN, M.D., B.S. (Lond.), F.R.C.S. (1893); Professor of Clinical 
Surgery, WALTER WHITEHEAD, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S.E. (1892)! ; Lecturer on 
Practical Surgery, G. A. WRIGHT, B.A., M.B. (Oxford), F.R.C.S. (1893)!; 
Assistant, JOSEPH COLLIER, M.B., B.S. (Lond.), F.R.C.S. (1893)!; 
Lecturer on Operative Surgery, F. A. SOUTHAM, M.A., M.B. (Oxford), 
F.R.C.S. (i8 93 )f. 

(') During a portion of Sir W. Roberts' tenure, he was entitled " Professor of Clinical 
Medicine." 



( '07 ) 

The courses consist of the following : (i.) Systematic Surgery and 
Surgical Pathology (3 hrs., winter session) ; (ii.) Practical Surgery (lectures 
and demonstrations, twice weekly, winter session) ; (iii.) Operative Surgery 
(once weekly winter session, twice weekly summer session) ; in this class 
each member is required to perform operations on the dead body. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. The Dumville Surgical 
Prize, founded by Mrs. Dumville, in memory of her husband, Arthur W. 
Dumville, Esq., is awarded annually (see p. 142). 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872, Professor 1873. GEORGE SOUTHAM, F.R.C.S. ; deceased 1876.! 
1873. EDWARD LUND, F.R.C.S.; resigned 1888; Emeritus Professor 

(deceased 1898).! 
1888. A. W. HARE, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S.E. ; resigned 1892. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
1876. SAMUEL MESSENGER BRADLEY, F.R.C.S. (in Practical and Operative 

Surgery); deceased i88o.t 
1881. THOMAS JONES, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. (in Practical Surgery); resigned 

1888 (now Professor of Systematic Surgery), t 
1881. F. A. SOUTHAM, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. (in Surgery); appointed 

Lecturer in Clinical Surgery, 1884; resigned 1890 (now 

Lecturer in Operative Surgery).! 
1881. ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. (in Surgical Pathology); appointed 

Professor of Anatomy and Surgical Pathology, 1885 ; resigned Chair 

of Surgical Pathology 1893.! 

1884. JAMES HARDIE, M.D. (in Clinical Surgery); resigned 1890. 
1884. F. A. HEATH, M.R.C.S. (in Qinical Surgery) ; resigned 1889 (deceased 

1899). 

1884. WALTER WHITEHEAD, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S.E. (in Clinical Surgery); 

appointed Professor 1892.! 
1884. G. A. WRIGHT, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. (in Clinical Surgery) ; resigned 

1890 (now Lecturer on Practical Surgery ).t 



OBSTETRICS AND GYN/ECOLOGY. 

The staff consists of the following : Professor of Obstetrics and 
Gynaecology, W. JAPP SINCLAIR, M.A., M.D. (Aberdeen), M.R.C.P. (1888) ; 
Assistant, A. W. W. LEA, M.D., B.S. (Lond.), F.R.C.S. (1895) ; Lecturer 
on Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology, D. LLOYD ROBERTS, M.D. 
(St. Andrew's), F.R.C.P., F.R.S.E. (1884). 

The following courses are given : (i.) Obstetrics (4 hrs., summer 
session) ; (ii.) Gynaecology (2 hrs., winter session). Special practical 
demonstrations are also given in both subjects. 

Clinical instruction is given at the Royal Infirmary, St. Mary's 
Hospital, and the Southern Hospital. 

SPECIAL ENDOWMENTS AND BENEFACTIONS. None. 

FORMER PROFESSORS. 

Appointed Lecturer 1872, Professor 1876. JOHN THORBURN, M.D. ; deceased 1885. 
Professor 1885. C. J. CULLINGWORTH, M.D., F.R.C.P. ; resigned i888.t 



FORENSIC MEDICINE AND TOXICOLOGY. 

Professor, J. DIXON MANN, M.D. (St. Andrew's), F.R.C.P. (1892).! 

ACCOMMODATION. The Toxicological Laboratories are well fitted up 
for toxicological investigations and research. 

A lecture course (3 hrs. weekly) and a practical course (i|- hrs.) are 
given in the summer session. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
Appointed 1872. G. MORLEY HARRISON; resigned 1876. 

1876. ARTHUR RANSOME, M.D., F.R.S. ; resigned 1878.! 

1879. C. J. . CULLINGWORTH, M.D. ; resigned 1885. t 

1886. J. DIXON MANN, M.D., F.R.C.P., appointed Professor, 1892.! 



PUBLIC HEALTH. 

Lecturer, JAMES NIVEN, M.A. (Aberdeen and Camb.), M.B. (Camb.) 
(1898), Medical Officer of Health for Manchester. 

A course of lectures (i hr.) is given during the summer session, 
to candidates for the Second M.B. Examination and for the Diploma of 
Public Health. (See also under the Department of Public Health, p. in.) 

FORMER PROFESSOR. 
Appointed 1894. ARTHUR RANSOME, M.D., F.R.S.; resigned 1895.! 

FORMER LECTURERS. 
Appointed 1873. ARTHUR RANSOME, M.D., F.R.S.; resigned 1889.! 

1890. J. F. W. TATHAM, M.D. ; resigned 1893 (now Superintendent of 

Statistics, Registrar-General's Office, London). 
1894. C. E. PAGET, M.B. ; resigned 1898 (now Medical Officer of 

Health for Northamptonshire). 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

Lecturer in Ophthalmology and Clinical Ophthalmology, CHARLES 
E. GLASCOTT, M.D. (Edin.) (1885) ('). 

The lecture course (2 hrs) is given during the summer session. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1872. RICHARD T. HUNT, M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1874. 
1874. THOMAS WINDSOR, M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1878. 
1878. DAVID LITTLE, M.D. ; resigned 1899. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

Lecturer, HENRY ASHBY, M.D. (Lond.), F.R.C.P. (1881). 

The course, 2 hrs. weekly, summer session ; Clinical teaching is given 
at the Children's Dispensary, Gartside Street, twice weekly. 

(') Dr. Glascott was elected Lecturer in Clinical Ophthalmology in 1885, in 
Ophthalmology in 1900. 

R 



MENTAL DISEASES. 

Lecturer, G. W. MOULD, M.R.C.S. (1881). 

The course (2 hrs., summer session) is held partly at the College, partly 
at the Royal Lunatic Asylum, Cheadle, where Clinical Instruction is also 
given. 

SKIN DISEASES. 
Lecturer, H. A. G. BROOKE, M.B., B.A. (Lond.) (1889). 

The course (i hr. weekly, summer session) is given partly at the 
College, partly at the Hospital for Skin Diseases, Quay Street, Deansgate. 

DISEASES OF THE EAR. 

Lecturer, WILLIAM MILLIGAN, M.D. (Aberd.) (1892). 

A course of 12 lectures is given in the summer session. In addition, 
a class for practical and tutorial instruction is held at the Royal Infirmary. 

DISEASES OF THE LARYNX. 

Lecturer, ALEXANDER HODGKINSON, M.B., B.Sc. (Edin.) (1890). 

A course of 1 2 lectures is given in the summer session, partly at the 
College and partly at the Hospital for Diseases of the Chest and Throat, 
Hardman Street, Deansgate, where additional demonstrations are also given. 

DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY ORGANS. 

Lecturer, T. HARRIS, M.D. (Lond.), F.R.C.P. (1892)^ 

This course (i hr.) given during the summer session, is mainly Clinical ; 
a few lectures are given at the College, the rest at the Infirmary. 



( I" ) 

DISEASES OF THE HEART. 

GRAHAM STEELL, M.D. (Edin.), F.R.C.P. (1893).! 

This course, for senior students and general practitioners, is 
arranged to meet during the summer session. 

TROPICAL DISEASES. 

E. S. REYNOLDS, M.D. (Lond.), F.R.C.P. (1900). 
The course (i hr.) is given during the summer session. 

FORMER LECTURER. 
Appointed 1898. GRAHAM STEELL, M.D., F.R.C.P. ; resigned 1899.! 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 

In this Department the instruction given is adapted to the requirements 
of candidates preparing for the Examinations of the various Universities and 
Examining Bodies for the Diploma of Public Health. 

Besides the lectures on Public Health given in the summer session 
(see p. 109), Laboratory Courses in Chemistry, Bacteriology, Practical 
Pathology, and Microscopy are arranged so that a candidate may take the 
complete course by attending either from October to March or from January 
to July. 

The staff consists of the following : The Lecturer on Public Health, 
the Professors and Assistant Lecturers in Chemistry and Organic 
Chemistry, the Professor of Pathology, and the Demonstrator and 
Assistant Lecturer in Bacteriology. 

(i.) PUBLIC HEALTH. A lecture course (i hr.) is given to candidates 
for the Diploma in Public Health. A course of practical demonstrations 
is also given by arrangement with candidates for the Diploma, in the 
various branches with which a Medical Officer of Health has to deal. 



( I" ) 

(ii.) CHEMISTRY APPLIED TO PUBLIC HEALTH. A special class for 
students preparing for Examinations in Sanitary Science, meeting twice a 
week for six months (October to March or January to June), for practice in 
the use of instruments and chemical methods, with special reference to the 
examination of air and water, is held on two days weekly, between 
10 a.m. and 3 p.m. 

(iii.) BACTERIOLOGY. A course (2 afternoons weekly) dealing specially 
with (i) methods of staining, cultivating, and isolating micro-organisms; 
(2) sterilization and disinfection ; and (3) examination of air, water, soils, 
etc., is given. 

(iv.) PRACTICAL PATHOLOGY AND MICROSCOPY. -- A course (4 hrs. 
weekly) dealing with (a) Diseases of animals communicable to man ; (6) 
Food adulteration and contamination ; (<:) Microscopical impurities of air 
and water; (d) Microscopical examination of textile fibres. 

The Chemical and Pathological Laboratories are both open for research 
work in subjects relating to Public Health. 

A MUSEUM. It is hoped that, as soon as funds are available, a museum 
of sanitary appliances accessible to the public may be provided, and that 
a special course of instruction may be arranged in connection therewith. 



THE DENTAL DEPARTMENT. 

This Department now contains 40 students. Students attend courses 
in Anatomy (lectures and practical work), Physiology, Practical Physiology, 
Medicine, Surgery, Hospital Practice, and Clinical Lectures in Surgery, and 
the courses on the subjects detailed below. 

Dental Hospital Practice is attended at the Victoria Dental Hospital, 
and General Hospital Practice at the Manchester Royal Infirmary. 



DENTAL ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY. 

Lecturer, C. H. PRESTON, M.D. (Lond.), F.R.C.S., L.D.S. (1900). 

This course (i hr.), dealing with Human and Comparative Dental 
Anatomy and Physiology, is given in the summer session. 

FORMER LECTURERS. 

Appointed 1884. JOSEPH COLLIER, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. ; resigned 1885.! 
1886. A. M. PATERSON, M.D., M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1888. t 
1889. W. A. HOOTON, L.D.S., M.R.C.S. ; resigned 1900. 

DENTAL HISTOLOGY. 

Lecturer, DAVID HEADRIDGE, L.D.S. (1892). 

This course (i hr.) is given during the summer session. 

DENTAL SURGERY AND PATHOLOGY. 

Lecturer, G. G. CAMPION, L.D.S. (1888). 

This course (i hr.) is given in the summer session. 

FORMER LECTURER. 
Appointed 1884. LEONARD MATHESON, L.D.S.; resigned 1887. 

PRACTICAL AND OPERATIVE DENTAL SURGERY. 
Lecturer, G. O. WHITTAKER, L.D.S. (1891). 

The lecture course (i hr.) is given in the summer session. Kach 
lecture is followed by a demonstration at the Victoria Dental Hospital. 

DENTAL MECHANICS. 

Lecturer, THOMAS TANNER, L.D.S. (1884). 

This course (i hr.) is given in the winter session. 



4 



DENTAL METALLURGY. 

Lecturer, J. P. HEADRIDGE, B.Sc. (Lond.), L.D.S., D.D.S. (Penn- 
sylvania) (1898). 

A lecture course (i hr.) is given from October to December on the 
metals employed in Dentistry, and is followed by a practical course held 
from January to March. 

FORMER LECTURER. 
Appointed 1884. C. A. BURGHARDT, Ph.D. ; resigned 1898.! 

THE PHARMACEUTICAL DEPARTMENT. 

STAFF. The staff consists of the Professors and Assistant Lecturers 
in the Departments of Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacology, 
Chemistry, Physics, and Botany. 

The Department prepares Students for the Minor and Major ex- 
aminations of the Pharmaceutical Society. 

CLASSES. Theoretical and practical courses are given in the following 
subjects : Chemistry (Inorganic, Organic, and Pharmaceutical), Physics, 
Botany, Materia Medica, and Pharmacy. A course is also given on 
Pharmacy Law. (See also pp. 98 to 100.) 

For Exhibition, etc, see pp. 142, 144. 

THE MANCHESTER MEDICAL SOCIETY'S LIBRARY. 

The Manchester Medical Society's Library is housed in the Medical 
School, and is open to students of the College. It contains about 32,600 
volumes. About 90 periodicals, English and foreign, exclusive of the trans- 
actions of medical societies, are taken in (see also p. 8). 



HOSPITALS FOR CLINICAL INSTRUCTION. 

Clinical instruction is given to medical students from the Owens College 
at the following Hospitals : 

(i.) The Manchester Royal Infirmary. The number of beds is 
290, the number of in-patients, 4,000 annually, of out- and 
home-patients, over 20,000 annually. About 1,400 opera- 
tions are performed annually in the operation theatres. 
Associated with the Infirmary are : 

(i.) The Convalescent Hospital at Cheadle with 136 beds. 

(ii.) The Royal Lunatic Hospital at Cheadle with 350 
patients. 

(2.) St. Mary's Hospital, for the treatment of maternity cases and 
of diseases peculiar to women, and the diseases of children. 
The number of beds in the present hospital is 60, and in 1 898 
the number of in-patients was 1,268 (including 221 
maternity-patients), of home-patients 2,110, of out-patients 
10,279, of maternity-home-patients 3,420. A new hospital 
is in course of erection, with room for 125 beds. 

(3.) The Manchester Royal Eye Hospital (Oxford Street and 
St. John Street). The hospital contains no beds. In 
1899 the number of in-patients was 1,433 ; f out-patients 
23,616. 

(4.) The General Hospital and Dispensary for Sick Children 
(Pendlebury and Gartside Street). The hospital at Pendle- 
bury contains 140 beds. In 1899 the number of in-patients 
was 1,443. At the Dispensary the number of out-patients 
was 14,886. 

(5.) The Manchester Hospital for Diseases of the Ear (Byrom 
Street). The hospital contains 10 beds. 



( "6 ) 

(6.) The Manchester Southern Hospital for Women and Children 
(Clifford Street and Upper Brook Street). The institution 
contains 52 beds. In the year 1898-9, the number of 
in-patients was 590 (including 173 maternity-patients) ; of 
out-patients 4,561 ; of maternity-home-patients 1,195. 

(7.) The Cancer Pavilion and Home (Hospital Gardens, Oxford 
Street). This institution contains 20 beds. In the year 
1898-9 the number of in-patients was 117, of out-patients 
108. 

(8) The Victoria Dental Hospital (Devonshire Street). In 1899 
the number of patients was 12,474. 




THE CHRISTIE LIBRARY. 



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VIIL-The Library. 



The Owens College Library contains, at present, about 70,000 volumes. 

STAFF. The staff consists of the following : Librarian, W. E. RHODES, 
M.A. (Viet.) (1895); Assistant- Librarian, H. PERCIVAL ; and two boys. 
Since 1898 Miss T. POTTS, M.A. (Viet.), has been engaged on the pre- 
paration of the catalogue. 

THE CHRISTIE LIBRARY. The Library is housed in a special 
building called "The Christie Library," erected in the years 1895-1898 at 
a cost of about ,22,000, and presented to the College by Mr. Richard 
Copley Christie, LL.D., who for fifteen years held a professorship in the 
College (see pp. 51, 52, 85). The building, in the Early-English style, is 
from the designs of Messrs. Alfred Waterhouse & Son, and occupies a plot 
of ground, 100 ft. by 46 ft., on the south side of the quadrangle. It con- 
sists of a ground floor and two upper floors connected by an outer stair- 
case. The ground floor is occupied by seven rooms and two corridors 
lined with book-shelves, and is devoted to Law, Modern and Ancient 
Languages, Philosophy, Theology, History, Economics, and Education. 
The rooms are used for study by the staff of the College, and persons 
engaged in special research. They are also used at stated times for 
certain Honours Classes in History, Philosophy, and other subjects. 

The first floor is occupied by the Reading Room and Reference Library, 
a large room 97 ft. long, 40 ft. wide, and 20 ft. in height. The shelves 
contain the books of general reference, nearly the whole of the sections on 
English, French, German, and Italian Literature, and selections of books 
from the other sections of the Library. A set of shelves is also reserved 
for all new acquisitions, which are kept in this room for a year. Current 
numbers of the various periodicals are laid on special tables. Students 
have free access to the shelves in the main portion of this room. In 

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the northern portion of the room (40 ft. by 27 ft.), which is separated from 
the rest by a fine carved oak screen, are at present placed cases containing 
rare books and MSS. and the busts mentioned below. The founder has 
expressed a wish that his own private collection should ultimately be 
placed in this room. 

The Reading Room contains portraits of the late Duke of Devonshire, 
first President of the College, of John Dalton (by H. Cardwell), Mr. Alfred 
Neild, late Treasurer, and Dr. Ward, Principal from 1889 to 1897 (both by 
Mr. H. Herkomer, R.A.), of Mr. Richard Copley Christie, and of the late 
Dr. John Hopkinson, F.R.S. (both by Mr. T. B. Kennington). It also 
contains busts of the late Mrs. Gaskell (by Mr. H. Thornycroft, R.A., after 
D. Dunbar), of Bishop Prince Lee (by Matthew Noble), of Mr. -Scott, 
Principal from 1851 to 1857, of Dr. Greenwood, Principal from 1857 to 1889 
(by Mr. Onslow Ford, R.A.), and of Professor W. Stanley Jevons (by 
Mr. E. Roscoe Mullins). 

The second floor consists of one large room divided into bays on either 
side by transverse shelving, and has accommodation for 20,000 volumes. It 
is devoted almost entirely to science. 

About 10,000 duplicate volumes are lent permanently to special 
laboratories and departments. These departmental libraries are in constant 
use, and of great value. 

DONATIONS OF BOOKS. The original nucleus of the Library consisting 
of 1,200 volumes was given by the late James Heywood, F.R.S. , in 1851. 
In 1870 Dr. Prince Lee, first Bishop of Manchester, bequeathed to the 
College his library of 7,000 volumes, consisting mainly of works on 
Theology and History, including local History, together with many valuable 
editions of Greek and Latin Classics. In 1890 a Committee of Subscribers 
presented about 2,000 books on Law, the library of the late Professor 
Muirhead of Edinburgh. The History collection was greatly strengthened 
in 1892 by the gift from the Whitworth Legatees of the library of the 
late Professor E. A. Freeman, consisting of some 6,000 volumes. The 




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room in which the majority of the History books are kept is named 
" The Freeman Library." In Classics the chief donations have been the 
Hager Memorial Library (given in 1895 by friends of the late Dr. Herman 
Hager, lecturer in German), and a collection of works and dissertations on 
Greek Inscriptions given by the Rev. Canon E. L. Hicks. The Hager 
Library also contains a large number of works on German Literature and 
Language. 

Two collections of books on Oriental Literature have been bequeathed 
by the late Samuel Robinson, Esq., of Wilmslow, in 1884, and by the late 
Professor Theodores in 1886. In 1899 the Manchester Goethe Society 
presented a valuable library of works relating to Goethe. 

In 1878 Mrs. Venables Vernon gave 1,120 volumes, chiefly on 
Astronomy and Meteorology, and in the same year Mrs. Grace Calvert 
gave 1,266 volumes, chiefly on Chemistry. In 1885 the library of the late 
R. Angus Smith, F.R.S., consisting of 4,000 volumes, chiefly on Chemistry 
and Physics, was presented by a number of Dr. Smith's friends, and in 1895 
the library of Dr. Arthur Milnes Marshall, formerly Professor of Zoology, 
was presented by his family. A fund raised by his friends to perpetuate 
his memory was mainly devoted to establishing an endowment to cover 
the cost of the continuations of periodicals. In 1898 Professor Boyd 
Dawkins gave a large collection of geological books, and in the same year 
Mr. Edward Donner presented a copy of the folio Shakespere of 1623 in 
memory of the late Mr. Thomas Ashton. 

DONATIONS OF MONEY. The following is a list of the most important 
donations : 

1874 : Charles James Darbishire, Esq., \,ioo (expended). 

1882 : Edmund Salis Schwabe, Esq., .200 (expended). 

1884-1894 : Mrs. Grace Calvert (donations and bequests) ^"500 for 
books in Chemistry. 

1885 : Bequest of Samuel Robinson, Esq., for books in Oriental 
Literature, ^500. 



( 120 ) 

1 886 : The Misses Gaskell (for the purchase of books in the subjects of 
English Language and Literature, and Greek Testament) .500. 

1887 : The Whitworth Legatees, an endowment of ;ioo a year. 
1892 : C. J. Hey wood, Esq., for the purchase of works of modern 

literature, ^500 (expended). 

1898 : An anonymous donation through the Principal, ,500. 

The library possesses a few mediaeval manuscripts, and a fair number of 
rare books. Its strongest departments, at present, are History and Physical 
Science, the collections of scientific periodicals being numerous. 

CATALOGUE. A new author catalogue and a subject catalogue, on the 
system of Mr. Melvil Dewey, are in course of preparation. Sectional subject 
catalogues, including the Freeman Library (by Mr. James Tait), Theology, 
Classics, Law, and Modern Languages and English, have been printed 
during the last six years. 

FINANCE. A sum of ,300, in addition to the sums produced from those 
special endowments which are not yet exhausted, is expended annually, 
under the direction of a General Library Committee, by two sub-committees 
representing Arts and Science. Of this sum ^140 is spent in learned 
periodicals. Out of the remainder, new books and bindings have to be 
provided. An increase in the funds available for the Library is greatly 
needed in order to maintain the efficiency of the collection. 

FORMER LIBRARIANS. 

Appointed 1851. GEORGE MATTINSON; resigned 1853. 

1853. J. HOLME NICHOLSON, M.A. ; resigned 1871.! 

1871. H. C. OATS, B.A., LL.B. ; resigned 1871. 

1871. J. TAYLOR KAY; resigned 1894. 

1895. J. H. CLARKE, B.A. ; deceased 1895. 




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IX.-The Manchester Museum. 

The Museum is under the management of a Committee, appointed by 
the College Council, consisting of members of the Court of Governors, and 
the Senate, together with representatives of the Manchester Corporation, 
and a number of gentlemen specially elected on account of their scientific 
interests and distinction. 

The members of the staff are as follows : Director of the Museum, 
WILLIAM E. HOYLE, M.A.,M.Sc., F.R.S.E. (1889) (')t ; Assistant Lecturer in 
Geology, BERNARD HOBSON, M.Sc. (1889)1 ; Assistant Keepers, J. RAY 
HARDY (1889), R. STANDEN (1896), CECIL B. CRAMPTON, M.B. (1898), 
and HAROLD MURRAY (1898) ; Printer, Miss FREDA C. EDE (1892). 

There are also three Museum attendants and two porters. 

The nucleus of the present Museum consists of the specimens 
belonging to the Manchester Natural History Society and the Manchester 
Geological Society, transferred to the College in 1872, together with certain 
endowments (see p. 9). 

The conditions of these transfers were, speaking generally, that the 
College should house and maintain the collections, and give the public 
access to them on certain days free of charge, and that a number of 
free public lectures should be delivered each year. 

For some years the collections had to be stored in such small compass 
that a large part of them were practically inaccessible. 

At length, however, in the year 1888, the New Museum Buildings, 
erected by public subscription, aided by a donation of ,27,500 from the 
Whitworth Legatees, were completed, the transfer and proper arrange- 
ment of the collections were begun, and the buildings were formally opened 
on June 8th, i888.( 2 ) 

(') Mr. Hoyle's title, down to the year 1899, was "Keeper of the Museum." 
(') They had already been used as the reception rooms of the British Association in the 
autumn of 1887. (See also pp. 13, 14.) 



The Museum buildings were designed by Mr. Alfred Waterhouse, R.A., 
and form the northern half of the Oxford Road frontage. On the ground 
floor there is a large geological room, 92 ft. long by 49 ft. broad, devoted to 
the fossils from the primary and secondary formations, which leads into 
another room 67 ft. long by 26 ft. broad, where the mineralogical and 
petrological collections are displayed. The grand staircase, which also serves 
as an approach to the College Council Chamber, only ascends to the first 
floor, where there is a large hall 92 feet long by 49 feet broad, and 35 feet 
in height, furnished with two galleries which run round the hall. On the 
east side of the floor are the collections from the tertiary deposits, on the 
west sido the mammalia. The first gallery contains the remainder of the 
vertebrata, and the second the invertebrata. The botanical department 
occupies two rooms, the same size as the mineralogical room, and leading 
off the first and second galleries. The Egyptian and other ethnological 
collections are contained in a small room on the first floor, and in another 
room opening off the upper gallery. In addition there are workrooms for the 
staff, a room for the library and another for printing, as well as corridors in 
the upper part of the building, where the " Dresser " collection, stores of 
duplicates, and so forth, are housed. 

The lines upon which the Museum work is conducted are intended to 
be as broad and liberal as possible. It takes cognizance of Natural History 
in a wide sense, with special reference to Mineralogy, Geology, Zoology, 
and Botany, without, however, excluding such subjects as Ethnology and 
Anthropology. 

The principal special collections contained in the Museum are as 
follows : 

I. GEOLOGY AND PALAEONTOLOGY. The " David Forbes " collection of Minerals and 
Rock Specimens ; the " Waters " collection of Fossils, presented by A. W. Waters, 
Esq.; the "Boyd Dawkins" collection of Fossils, Minerals, and Prehistoric remains, 
presented by Professor Boyd Dawkins ; the " Williamson " collection of Yorkshire 
Fossils and specimens of Coal, presented by the late Professor Williamson ; the 
" Cash " collection of Sections of Carboniferous Plants ; the " Kay-Shuttleworth " 



( "3 ) 

collection of Carboniferous Fossils, presented by the Rt. Hon. Sir Ughtred J. 
Kay-Shuttleworth, Bart., M.P. ; the " Hick " collection of Sections of Carboniferous 
Plants, presented by the Thomas Hick Memorial Committee; the "George Wild" 
collection of Carboniferous Fossils. 

II. ZOOLOGY. The " Cholmondeley " collection of Shells, presented by Lord Egerton 

of Tatton ; The "Walton " collection of Shells, bequeathed by the late W. Walton, 
Esq. ; the " Dresser " collection of Palaearctic Birds and of Meropidas and of ' 
Coraciidae ; the " Collett " collection of British Beetles and of Hemiptera. 

III. BOTANY. The "Hewett Cottrell Watson " Herbarium of European Plants, presented 
by J. G. Baker, Esq., F.R.S. ; the "Williamson" Herbarium of British Plants, 
presented by the late Professor Williamson ; the " Wood " Herbarium of Mosses ; 
the " Carrington " Herbarium, comprising a very large collection of Hepaticae ; 
the " Lomax " Herbarium of British Plants, presented by Miss Lomax. 

IV. NUMISMATICS. The " Reuben Spencer " collection of British and Foreign Coins, 
presented by Reuben Spencer, Esq. ; the " Bellot " collection of Chinese Coins. 

The " Flinders Petrie " collection of Egyptian antiquities has been 
for some time on loan in the Museum, and is of especial interest, many 
of the examples contained in it being quite unique. Another collection 
of Egyptian antiquities has been deposited in the Museum by Mr. 
M. E. Robinow, and one of Peruvian earthenware and textiles by 
Mr. Smithies. 

The separate library of the Museum consists of more than 4,000 
books and pamphlets, partly transferred to the College by the Manchester 
Natural History Society, with its collections, partly purchased from a 
special fund, given by the Whitworth Legatees in 1887. A catalogue 
of this library has been printed. 

The Museum is open to the public on every week-day, from 
ii a.m. to 5 p.m.; on Sundays, from 2.30 to 4.30 p.m.; and on the 
first Wednesday in each month, from 7 to 9 p.m. The Museum and 
Museum Library are further open, on application, to persons desirous to 
make use of them for the purposes of study. Students of the College 
are admitted to the Museum on any day in the week between the hours 
of 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. 



( "4 ) 

During the year 1898-9 the attendance on week-days varied from 
30 to 372 ; on Saturdays and Sundays from 40 to 450 ; the largest 
attendance, 952, was on Easter Monday. 

Courses of Museum Lectures are regularly delivered in rotation by 
the Biological and Geological professors of the College ; while occasional 
lectures and special lectures for children, all of them free, are given, on 
public holidays, by the Director of the Museum. 

In addition to these lectures, Professor Boyd Dawkins has for the 
last twenty years delivered addresses in the Museum, generally on 
Saturday afternoons, to the members of numerous societies, and others 
from various parts of Lancashire. 

The following courses have been offered during 1899-1900 : (i.) 3 
lectures by Professor Hickson on " The Races of Mankind " ; (ii.) 3 
lectures by Professor Weiss on " The Work of Micro-organisms " ; and 
(iii.) 3 lectures by Professor Dawkins on " The Ethnology of Britain." 
All these lectures are given on Saturday afternoons at 3.30. Popular 
Museum Lectures will be given on "Animal Work," "Animal Play," and 
" Animal Art " by the Director of the Museum on Bank Holidays (with 
an additional Lecture for children on "Wasps"). Professor Dawkins will 
give 12 short addresses on Saturdays and Sundays, and demonstrations 
will be given by members of the Museum Staff on the first Wednesday 
of each month. 

To the original endowment of .14,589 transferred with the collections, 
the Whitworth Legatees in 1888 added a sum of 10,000. The income 
of the Museum from these endowments is, in round figures, ,900 a 
year ; a grant of .400 per annum is received from the Manchester City 
Council, making a total of .1,300. It has been found impossible to 
carry on the work of the Museum at a less expenditure than about 
.2,700, thus leaving a yearly deficit of about 1,400, which is at 
present met by the Owens College out of general income. It is essential 
that further support from public funds or private benefactions should 
be obtained to enable the work of the Museum to be carried on efficiently. 




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( "5 ) 

X.-Collegfe Societies, Athletics, etc, 

COLLEGE SOCIETIES. 

The oldest students' society in the College is the Debating Society, 
founded in 1861 under the title of the Owens College Union. In 1880 
the College Societies existing at the time amalgamated under the latter title. 
The Owens College Union (for men) now includes (i.) the Debating Society, 
founded in 1861 ; (ii.) the Medical Students' Debating Society, founded in 
1873 ; (iii.) the Literary Society (originally called the Shakspere 
Society), founded in 1874; (iv.) the Chemical Society, founded in 1877; 
(v.) the Biological Society, founded in 1879 ; (vi.) the Engineering 
Society, founded in 1883. 

The College grants to the Union rooms in Dover House ; these have 
been furnished by the Union as a Reading Room, Billiard Room, Chess 
Room, Library, etc., and are reserved for the use of members. The 
Committee of the Union, elected by the constituent societies, manages 
these rooms, publishes " The Owens College Magazine " monthly, 
organizes social meetings for students and an annual public conversazione, 
and in general acts as representative of the social life of the students. 

The constituent Societies elect separate committees, and manage their 
own internal affairs ; they meet as a rule once fortnightly, in the evening, for 
the reading of papers and discussion of political, scientific, or literary 
questions within their particular scope. 

The annual fee for members is 55. for each society, in addition to 
a fee of IDS. for membership of the Union. 

The Owens College Christian Union (men), affiliated to the British 
College Christian Union, was founded in 1898-9; it is not a constituent 
Society of the Owens College Union. 

The Owens College Women's Union, founded in 1900, includes the 
following societies for women students : (i.) the Debating Society ; 



( 126 ) 

(ii.) the Catherine Wheel Society (for present and past students of the 
Day Training College) ; (iii.) the Christian Union, affiliated to the 
British College Christian Union ; (iv.) the Browning Society ; and 
(v.) the Hockey Club. With regard to the special accommodation 
provided for women students on the Athletic Ground, see below, p. 127. 

The following societies include both men and women students, and 
are not incorporated with either Union : (i.) the Photographic Club, 
founded in 1898-9; (ii.) the Philosophical Society, founded in 1899; an & 
(iii.) the Historical Society, founded in 1900. 

THE ATHLETIC UNION AND THE ATHLETIC GROUND. 

THE ATHLETIC UNION. At the commencement of each session 
every student is expected to pay an annual athletic fee of los. 6d. ; this 
fee gives the privilege of membership of the following clubs, which are 
incorporated in the Athletic Union, viz : the Cricket, Rugby Football, 
Association Football, Lacrosse, Lawn Tennis, and Fives Clubs. 

The Athletic Union is managed by a Committee consisting of a presi- 
dent, three members elected by the Council and Senate, and two repre- 
sentatives from each of the constituent Clubs. 

The Athletic Union Committee control the Athletic Ground and make 
arrangements for the Athletic Sports held annually in the Easter Term. 

The constituent Clubs elect committees to manage their internal affairs. 

The Fives Club has the use of a covered court adjoining the 
gymnasium. 

THE ATHLETIC GROUND. For some years the College Council has 
leased a ground of about eight acres on the Mabfield Estate at Fallowfield, 
for Rugby Football and Lacrosse in winter, and for Cricket and Lawn 
Tennis in the summer. The Association Football Club has used a ground 
at Birch, and the Lacrosse Club a second ground at Mabfield. In Decem- 
ber 1897 tne Residuary Legatees of the late Sir Joseph and Lady Whitworth 







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( "7 ) 

presented the College with a ground of about eleven acres on the Firs estate, 
Fallowfield. The ground has been levelled, drained, and laid out under the 
direction of Mr. E. Thomas of Aughton, and a pavilion has been built 
from the designs of Mr. J. W. Beaumont, at a total cost of about ^"7,000. 
Three plots, each 120 yards by 80 yards are reserved for Rugby Football, 
Association Football, and Lacrosse respectively, and a plot 40 yards 
square for the cricket-pitch. Spaces are also reserved for Lawn Tennis 
Courts and for a running-track. 

A portion of the pavilion, and special Lawn Tennis Courts are 
reserved for women students ; and a ground for the women's Hockey 
Club (see p. 126) has been secured in an adjoining field. 

The Athletic Ground will be ready for use in the autumn of 1900. 

A Swimming Club, which is not included in the Athletic Union, 
meets for practice at the Leaf Street Baths three times a week. 

THE HOLT GYMNASIUM. 

The gymnasium was originally built on the site now occupied by the 
Christie Library in 1878. Mrs. Langworthy gave .500 towards the cost of 
erection and fittings. The gymnasium was rebuilt on its present site 
adjoining the Medical School in 1897 at a cost of ,1,500, which was defrayed 
by Mr. Councillor Edward Holt. Its dimensions are 89 ft. by 39^ ft. 

Classes are held daily throughout the session, under the direction of 
the instructor, Quarter- Master Sergeant George Younger. 

Certain hours are reserved for women students, and special classes are 
held for fencing. 

A competition is held annually in the Gymnasium at which the Champion 
Eight is selected for the year. The " Marshall Gold Medal," founded as 
a memorial of the late Professor A. Milnes Marshall, is awarded to the best 
all-round competitor, and all the members of the Eight receive the College 
Badge. 



THE COLLEGE VOLUNTEER COMPANY. 

A company of Volunteers (infantry), formed in 1898, is attached to the 
2nd Volunteer Battalion of the Manchester Regiment. A Shooting Club 
is associated with the company. 

THE MANCHESTER UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT. 

Wardens : Warden of the Women's House, Miss ALICE CROMPTON, 
M.A., Viet. (1898); Warden of the Men's House, vacant. 

The Manchester University Settlement, connected closely, though 
not exclusively, with Owens College, was inaugurated in 1895 by the 
efforts of Dr. A. W. Ward and some former students. It includes two 
houses of residence, each v/ith a Warden ; for men at 17, Manor Street, 
Ardwick, for women at the Ancoats Art Museum. In addition to the 
residents, numbering ten in December, 1899, there are visiting or day 
workers, whose activities are educational, social, and recreative. Help is 
given to existing organizations. A number of University Extension 
Courses have been given at the Settlement, and a considerable number 
of other classes in various subjects are also held annually. 

The aims of the Settlement are stated as follows: "This Settlement 
is founded in the hope that it may become common ground on which 
men and women of various classes may meet in goodwill, sympathy, and 
friendship ; vhat the residents may learn something of the conditions of 
an industrial neighbourhood, and share its interests, and endeavour to live 
among their neighbours a simple and religious life." 

FORMER WARDENS. 
Appointed 1895. E. T. CAMPAGNAC, M.A. ; resigned 1898. 

1895. C. HELENE STOEHR (Head of the Women's House); resigned 1898. 
1899. SIDNEY MCDOUGALL, B.A. ; resigned 1900. 




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XL-The Halls of Residence* 

DALTON HALL. 

Principal, J. W. GRAHAM, M.A. Camb. (1897). 

The Hall was established under the name of the " Friends' Hall " in 
1876 by the Society of Friends in Manchester, and is managed by a 
Committee of that body. It is open to students of all denominations. 

The present building, which is a mile from the College, was opened in 
1882, and was called Dalton Hall, in memory of the great chemist, John 
Dalton, who was for fifty years a Member of the Friends' Meeting at Man- 
chester. In 1893 twelve new rooms and a Sanatorium were added and a 
large plot of adjoining land acquired. The Hall contains a Dining Hall, 
Library, Class Room, Common Room, Billiard Room, Engineering Work- 
shop, Photographic Chamber, and forty-two Studies, in addition to a 
Residence for the Principal. The building is lighted throughout by electricity. 
The grounds include Tennis Courts, in asphalt, grass, and shale, a covered 
Rugby Fives Court, and two acres of grass and shrubbery. 

General tutorial oversight and advice are given to the students by the 
Principal and six Tutors. 

FORMER PRINCIPAL. 
Appointed 1876. THEODORE NEILD, B.A., resigned 1897. 

HULME HALL. 

Warden, E. B. ENGLAND, Litt.D. (Camb.) (1892).! 

This Hall of Residence for students of Owens College, established 
under a scheme of the Charity Commissioners, dated August 26th, 1881, for 
regulating the Hulme Trust Estates, was opened in January, 1887. Under 
the scheme the Hall receives an endowment of ^1,000 a year, of which 



( '30 ) 

500 ' s to be given in scholarships, if candidates of sufficient merit present 
themselves. The scholarships are of the annual value of from .25 to .50, 
and are tenable for 3 years. The site and buildings, not quite a mile distant 
from the College, were the gift of Sir W. H. Houldsworth, Bart., M.P. ; the 
buildings were improved and refitted for the requirements of the Hall from 
a fund contributed by several donors. Religious worship is daily conducted 
according to the use of the Church of England, students whose friends desire 
it being exempted from attendance. The buildings comprise a residence for 
the Warden, rooms for two resident tutors and 30 students, chapel, dining 
hall, common room, library, bath-rooms, lavatories, and a workshop. Out- 
side are two covered Winchester fives-courts, two "squash" courts, and a lawn 
tennis ground. Many high University and College honours have been 
obtained by students of the Hall, the most distinguished of the former 
scholars being Mr. George Birtwistle, bracketed Senior Wrangler in 1899. 
The staff includes two resident tutors, and one non-resident tutor. 

FORMER WARDEN. 

Appointed 1886. Rev. Canon E. L. HICKS, M.A. (formerly Fellow and Tutor of Corpus Christi, 
Oxford) ; resigned 1892 (now Canon of Manchester, and Rector of 
St. Philip's, Salford). 



HALL OF RESIDENCE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS, 
ASHBURNE HOUSE, VICTORIA PARK. 

Warden, Miss HELEN M. STEPHEN (1899). 

This Hall was established in 1899 by the help of a few generous donors, 
and licensed as a Hall of Residence by the Owens College, for whose 
students it is intended, although other students may be admitted by special 
permission. The large house in Victoria Park, occupied by the Hall, with 
two acres of grounds, including a large garden and tennis-court, was given 
by one of the Residuary Legatees of the late Sir Joseph Whitworth ; 
it is about a mile from the College. The students' fees vary 




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according to the rooms chosen, from 36 to 60 guineas per session of 33 
weeks. With a few exceptions the rooms are furnished as study-bedrooms 
in the manner usual in women's colleges. There are common, drawing, 
and reading rooms, and the house is lighted by electricity. A few small 
bursaries are offered to students of sufficient merit. The Hall was opened 
in October, 1899, with eleven students. 

The Hall is under the management of a Council, of which the Principal 
of the Owens College is ex-officio a member, and of which the Council and 
Senate of the Owens College appoint each three members. The present 
officers of the Council are as follows : 

Chairman: A. H. WORTHINGTON, Esq. 
Treasurer: ALFRED HAWORTH, Esq. 

Secretaries: Miss ALICE M. COOKE, M.A., 
Professor S. ALEXANDER. 



( '32 ) 

XIL-Fellowships, Scholarships, 
Prizes, etc* 

I. UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS, STUDENTSHIP, SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS, AND ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS AND STUDENTSHIP. 

Four University Fellowships are offered annually, each of the value 
of ^100 for one year('), for "the encouragement of study and research." 
One Fellowship is awarded in the subjects of one of the Honours Schools 
of the Faculty of Arts or of the Faculty of Law ; another in the subjects 
of one Honours School in the Faculty of Science ; another in one of the 
subjects of the Faculty of Medicine ; and the fourth may be awarded in 
any of the Faculties. 

The Fellowships are open to graduates with Honours in the Faculties 
of Arts, Science, or Medicine, and to the graduates in the Faculty of Law, 
during the eighteen months immediately following the final degree 
examination. A grant not exceeding 20 may be made to a Fellow in aid 
of research work. 

A Gilchrist Travelling Studentship, of the value of ^80, presented 
annually by the Gilchrist Trustees, is open to graduates of not more than 
four years' standing proposing to engage in teaching in Secondary Schools. 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS. 

At least one University Scholarship of the value of ,25 (') is offered in 
each of the Honours Schools of the Faculties of Arts and Science, and at 
least one Scholarship on the results of the final examination for Degrees in 

(') Until 1899 University Fellowships were of the value o 



( '33 > ' 

Medicine and Surgery. The amounts of the Scholarships may in certain 
cases be increased to $o. 

A Derby Scholarship, of the annual value of about .30, tenable 
for two years, is offered annually to candidates in the. Honours School 
of Mathematics. The Scholarship was founded in 1880 by the Earl of 
Derby, K.G. 

A Mercer Scholarship, of the annual value of about ,30, tenable 
for one year, is offered annually to candidates in the Honours School 
of Chemistry. The Scholarship was founded in 1885 under the will of 
the late Robert Clayton Mercer, Esq. 

A John Bright Scholarship, of the value of ,100, is awarded 
biennially for a book or essay on some subject in English Literature, 
and is open to graduates of not more than two years' standing. The 
Scholarship was founded in 1891 by a Committee of Subscribers in 
memory of the late Rt. Hon. John Bright. 

UNIVERSITY ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS. 

The following Entrance Scholarships are awarded annually on the 
results of the Preliminary Examination, and are tenable at a College of 
the University : 

(i.) A Gilchrist Scholarship of the annual value of ^50, 
tenable for three years, offered by the Gilchrist 
Trustees. 

(ii.) Three University Scholarships of the annual value of 
,30, tenable for three years. 

(iii.) The William Summers Scholarship of the annual value 
of about ^40, tenable for three years, offered 
biennially to candidates from Huddersfield. 



u 



( 134 ) 

II.-COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS AND STUDENTSHIPS. 

I. The LANGTON FELLOWSHIP, founded in 1878 by subscribers in 
memory of the late William Langton, Esq., of the value of ^150 a year 
for three years, is awarded triennially to present or past male students for 
proficiency in Classics (including Archaeology and Philology), Philosophy, 
History, Modern Languages or Literature, Oriental Languages or 

Literature. 

FELLOWS.* 

1878. THOMAS WILSON DOUGAN, M.A., in Classics.^) 

1886. FRED HARSLEY, M.A., Ph.D., in History.( 2 ) 

1886. ERNEST WOOD RHODES, M.A., in History. 

1893. HEINRICH WALDER, M.A., in Classics. 

1899. J. M. ASHER, B.A., in Philosophy. 

(') Professor of Latin, Queen's College, Belfast. 
(') Lecturer in English, Berlin University. 

II. The JONES FELLOWSHIP, founded in 1890 by bequest of the late 
T. E. Jones, Esq., of Manchester, of the value of ^150 a year for two 
years, is awarded biennially for proficiency in History, and is only open 
to present or past students who have graduated in the History Honours 

School of the University. 

FELLOWS.* 

1890. ALICE M. COOKE, M.A.(') 
1893. W. E. RHODES, M.A.( 2 ) 
1896. MARY TOUT, M.A. (Honorary Fellow). 
1899. M. MARGARET NEWETT, B.A. 

(') Assistant Tutor, Department for Women, Owens College. 
( 2 ) Librarian, Owens College. 

III. The JOHN HARLING RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP, founded in 1900 
by R. H. Gibson, Esq., and R. P. Blakeley, Esq., in memory of the 
late John Harling, Esq., to promote research in Physics, is of the value of 
,100 a year, and tenable for one or two years. 

IV. The BISHOP BERKELEY FELLOWSHIPS (lapsed). For the history 
of the foundation of these Fellowships, see p. 1 3. They were of the annual 

The degrees appended to the names of Fellows are, as far as can be ascertained, their present degrees. 



( 135 ) 

value of .100, tenable for two years, and were awarded to Candidates 
showing capacity for undertaking some research. 

FELLOWS.* 

1 88 1. ALFRED SIDGWICK, B.A., in Philosophy. 
1881. BOHUSLAV BRAUNER, Ph.D., in Chemistry. (') 
1881. HARRY BAKER, in Chemistry.^) 

1881. HARRY MARSHALL WARD, Sc.D., F.R.S., in Biology.(') 

1882. CHARLES HAROLD HERFORD, Litt.D., M.A., in English language 

and Literature.(*) 
1882. ALFRED STAPLEY, in Philosophy. 

1882. HANS GADOW, Ph.D., in Zoology.( 6 ) 

1883. ARTHUR WILLIAM BRIGHTMORE, D.Sc., in Engineering.(') 

1884. JOHN BEARD, D.Sc., Ph.D., in Zoology.(') 
1884. LUDWIG CLAISEN, Ph.D., in Chemistry.( 8 ) 

1884. GEORGE HERBERT FOWLER, B.A., Ph.D., in Zoology.(') 

1885. FRED HARSLEY, M.A., Ph.D., in English Language and I.iterature.( 10 ) 
1885. PERCY F. KENDALL, in Geology.(") 

1885. A. LARMOR, M.A., in Applied Mathematics.( u ) 

1885. THOMAS ARTHUR PEACE, M.Sc., in Engineering. 

1886. HENRY HOLDEN, M.Sc., in Physics ( u ) 

1886. WM. A. SHAW, Litt.D., in History.(") 

1887. WILLIAM BOTT, Ph.D., in Chemistry.^'') 

1887. E. G. W. HEWLETT, M.A., in Classics and Philology.( ls ) 
1887. O. H. LATTER, M.A., in Zoology.( 17 ) 

(') Royal Adjunct in the University of Prague. 

(') Chemist to the Castner-Kellner Alkali Co., Runcorn. 

(*) Professor of Botany in the University of Cambridge ; Hon. Fellow of Christ's College. 

(*) Professor of English Language and Literature in the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. 

( 5 ) Strickland Curator and University Lecturer in Morphology in the University of Cambridge. 

(') Professor of Engineering in the Royal Engineering College, Cooper's Hill. 

( 7 ) Demonstrator of Zoology, University of Edinburgh. 

( 8 ) Professor of Chemistry in the University of Kiel. 

( 9 )Late Assistant-Professor of Zoology, University College, London. 
( 10 ) Lecturer in English Language, University of Berlin. 
(") Lecturer in Geology in the Yorkshire College, Leeds. 

( lz )Late Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge ; Resident Head Master, The Academy, Londonderry. 
( 13 ) Physics Master, Shrewsbury School. 
(') Calendarer of State Papers, Record Office. 
(* 5 ) Director of Government Technical School, Singapore. 
(") Master, Hulme Grammar School. 
( 17 ) Assistant Science Master, Charterhouse. 

* The degrees appended to the names of Fellows are, as far as can be ascertained, their present degrees. 



( '36 ) 

i888. ROBERT DUNLOP, M.A., in History. 

1888. J L. HOSKYNS-ABRAHALL, B.A., Ph.D., in Chemistry (deceased 1891). 

1888. C. H. LEES, D.Sc., in Physics.^) 

1888. G. S. TURPIN, D.Sc., M.A., in Chemistry.f) 

1889. P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc., in Chemical Physics.f) 
1889. T. H. HOLLAND, in Geology.(') 

1889. H. W. POMFRET, M.D., F.R.C.S., in Pharmacology. (*) 

1890. J. VV. CUNLIFFE, Litt.D., in English Literature.( 8 ) 
1890. W. GARSTANG, M.A., in Zoology.(') 

1890. W. R. ORMANDY, in Chemistry. 

1891. WILLIAM ARTHUR BONE, D.Sc., Ph.D., in Chemistry.( 8 ) 

1891. STANLEY DUNKERLEY, M.Sc., in Engineering. ( 9 ) 

1892. FREDERICK WILLIAM GAMBLE, D.Sc., in Zoology.(') 

1893. ALBERT GRIFFITHS, D.Sc., in Physics.( u ) 
1893. J. A HARKER, D.Sc., in Physics^ 12 ) 
1893. B. LEAN, B.A., D.Sc., in Chemistry.( 13 ) 

1893. H. B. POLLARD, M.A., D.Sc., in Zoology (deceased i896).( u ) 

1893. R. G. BURY, B.A., in Philosophy( 15 ) 

1894. A. W. CROSSLEY, D.Sc., Ph.D., in Chemistry.( 16 ) 

1894. A. H. JAMESON, M.Sc., in Engineering. (") 

1895. EDWARD HAWORTH, D.Sc., in Chemistry. ( 18 ) 
1895. JOHN BURKE, M.A., in Physics. 

1895. ERNEST WALDER, B.A., in English Literature.( w ) 

(') Senior Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in Physics, Owens College. 

( l ) Principal, Technical College, Swansea. 

(*) Senior Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in Chemistry, Owens College, and Secretary to the 

Victoria University Extension Committee. 
(') Indian Geological Survey, Calcutta. 

( 5 ) Surgical Registrar, Manchester Royal Infirmary, and Member of the Court of the Victoria University. 
(') Lecturer on English Literature, McGill College, Montreal, and Co-Editor of the Montreal Gazette. 

( 7 ) Late Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford ; Naturalist to the Marine Biological Station, Plymouth. 

( 8 ) Senior Assistant Lecturer and Demonstrator in Chemistry, Owens College. 
(') Professor of Engineering, Royal Naval College, Greenwich. 

( 10 ) Senior Demonstrator in Zoology, Owens College. 

(") Demonstrator in Physics, University College, Sheffield. 

( 12 ) Assistant Observer, Kew Observatory. 

( IJ ) Science Master, Ack worth School, Pontefract. 

('*) Late Lecturer in Zoology, Charing Cross Hospital. 

(") Late Professor of Classics in Bryn Mawr College, Pennsylvania. 

(") Demonstrator in Chemistry, St. Thomas's Hospital, London. 

(") Engineers' Office, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway. 

('*) Assistant Chemist, Castner-Kellner Alkali Co., Runcorn. 

I 19 ) Master at Fulneck School. 



( 137 ) 



V. HONORARY RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS. Since 1889 the Council has 
offered each year a limited number of such Fellowships to duly qualified 
candidates desirous of undertaking original investigations in the College. 
Such Fellowships are renewable for a second and in certain cases for a third 
year. Research Fellows are allowed free use of the Laboratories. 

VI. THE JEVONS STUDENTSHIP. Founded by subscription in memory 
of the late Professor William Stanley Jevons, F.R.S. Annual value, about 
"jo for one year, tenable at the Owens College each 6th year. Awarded 
for Economic Science. The student must carry out an investigation 
connected with the Lancashire industries. 

VII. HONORARY RESEARCH STUDENTSHIPS. The Council offers each 
year a limited number of such studentships to persons desirous of under- 
taking original investigations in the College. 

VIII. SCHUNCK BURSARIES. From the interest of a sum of money 
given by Dr. H. E. Schunck, F.R.S., bursaries are offered yearly to duly 
qualified candidates in Chemistry. 

IIL COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS, EXHIBITIONS, AND 

PRIZES.O 

CLASSICS. 



Name of Scholarship, 
Exhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 

aid 
General Remarks. 


VICTORIA SCHOLARSHIP, 
i852(increasedi872). 


Samuel Fletcher, Esq., and 
Charles James Heywood, 
Esq. 


;35; 

i year. 


Classics. 


2 BISHOP FRASER SCHO- 
LARSHIPS, 1880. 


The late Rt. Rev. James Fraser, 
second Bishop of Manchester, 
and Mrs. Fraser. 


^4; 

2 years. 


Greek, Latin, and Clas- 
sical History. 


OLIVER HEYWOOD 
SCHOLARSHIP, 1887. 


Oliver Heywood, Esq. . , , 


;s; 

2 years. 


Greek, Latin, and Clas- 
sical History. 



('; A list of Entrance Scholarships and Exhibitions is given separately on pp. 143 6. 



CLASSICS continued. 



Name of Scholarship, 
Exhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
and 
General Remarks. 


WELLINGTON SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1852. 


George Faulkner, Esq. . . . 


3S; 
i year. 


Greek Testament. 


BISHOP LEE SENIOR 
AND JUNIOR GREEK 
TESTAMENT PRIZES, 
1872 (First awarded, 
1877). 


Mrs. Susan Lee, in memory of 
her husband, the late Rt. 
Rev. J. Prince Lee, first 
Bishop of Manchester. 


Senior prize 
two-thirds, 
Junior 
prize, one- 
third of in- 
come from 


Greek Testament. 






;i,ooo. 




CLASSICAL PRIZE, 1872. 


The College .... 


5 


Greek and Latin, alter- 
nately. 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 



SHAKSPERE SCHOLAR- 


Subscription to commemorate 


40; 


Language and Litera- 


SHIP, 1863. 


tercentenary of Shakspere's 


2 years. 


ture. 




birth (1864). 






SHAKSPERE PRIZE, 


Shakspere Scholarship Fund . 


(> 


Literature. 


1897. 








NEW SHAKSPERE SO- 


The New Shakspere Society 


Books to 


Essay on subjects an- 


CIETY'S PRIZE, 1877. 




value of 


nounced. 






* 




EARLY ENGLISH TEXT 


The Early English Text Society. 


Books 


Early English. 


SOCIETY'S PRIZE, 








1866. 








ENGLISH ESSAY PRIZE, 


The College Council 


5 


Essay on subject an- 


1867. 






nounced. 


ENGLISH POEM PRIZE, 


Given by the Principal . 


S 


Poem on subject an- 


1869. 






nounced. 


MODERN AND ORIENTAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE. 


WALTERS SCHOLAR- 


Miss Annie Walters 


^3; 


French and German. 


SHIP, 1890. 




2 years. 




SAMUEL ROBINSON 


C. J. Heywood,Esq., in memory 





French and German. 


MODERN LANGUAGES 


of the late Samuel Robinson, 






PRIZE, 1887. 


Esq., of Wilmslow. 






DAVID S. BLES HEBREW 


David S. Bles, Esq. 


> 


Hebrew. 


PRIZE, 1886. 









( 139 ) 
HISTORY ('). 



Name of Scholarship, 
Kxhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
am) 
General Remarks. 


BRADFORD SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1877. 


Miss Mary Bradford, in memory 
of her brother, William Brad- 
ford, Esq. 


i year. 


History. 


2 JONES ENTRANCE 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 1897. 


Founded from Jones Fellow- 
ship Fund (p. 134). 


.35; 
2 years. 


Essay and History. 


SHUTTLEWOKTH HIS- 
TORY EXHIBITION, 
1899. 


Founded from Shuttleworth 
Scholarship Fund (see below). 


i year. 


History. 



(') See also the Jones Fellowship, p. 134. 



POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

SHUTTLEWORTH SCHO- Mrs. Elizabeth Shuttleworth, 
LARSHIP, 1865. 



WARBURTON ESSAY 
PRIZE, 1886. 



3 COBDEN CLUB PRIZES, 
1876. 



4 COBDEN PRIZES . 



2 DAUNTESEY LEGAL 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 
1878 ('). 



2 VICE-CHANCELLOR OF 
THE COUNTY PALA- 
TINE OF LANCASTER'S 
PRIZES, 1890. 



in memory of her husband, i i year. 
John Shuttleworth, Esq. 

Bequest of Thomas Warbur- ^30 every 
ton, Esq. 4th year. 



The Committee of the Cobden Books 
Club 



Founded from Political Eco- 20 (total 
nomy Professorship Fund, value of 

given by the Cobden Me- ! the three 
morial Committee. prizes). 



LAW. 

Bequest of Mrs. Catherine 
Dauntesey Foxton. 



The late Vice-Chancellor Bris- 
towe and his successors. 



i year. 



Books to 
value of 

jS- 5 s - 



Economics. 



Best essay on some sub- 
ject connected with 
Local Government. 

Political Economy (for 
day and evening 
classes). 

Political Economy, 
offered to teachers 
in schools in Man- 
chester and Salford 
attending evening 
classes. 



One in Jurisprudence 
and other subjects ; 
one in Common Law 
and other subjects. 

Equity, Real Property, 
and Conveyancing. 



(*) Under a former scheme, revised in 1892, a single Scholarship of ^100 was awarded annually. 



( 140 ) 
MATHEMATICS. 



Name of Scholarship, 
Exhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
and 
General Remarks. 


DALTON MATHEMATI- 
CAL SCHOLARSHIP, 

'854 0- 


Public subscription in memory 
of John Dalton. 


35; 

i year. 


Pure and Applied Ma- 
thematics. 


(') Under a former scheme, revised in 1892, a Senior and a Junior Scholarship were given annually. 


SCIENCE GENERALLY. 


EXHIBITION (1851) 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 1891. 


The Commissioners of the 185 1 
Exhibition. 


2 years (ex- 
ceptionally 
3). 


Some experimental 
science important in 
national industries. 
The scholar must 
undertake research. 








Awarded by the 
Commissioners on 








the recommendation 
of the College. 


JOHN BUCKLEY SCHO- 
LARSHIP, 1893. 


The Executors of the late John 
Buckley, Esq. 


z; 

i year. 


Offered to students in 
one of the following 
Honours Schools : 








Engineering, Phy- 
sics, Chemistry, Zoo- 
logy, or Botany. 


PHYSICS ('). 


HEGINBOTTOM SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1875. 


George Heginbottom, Esq. 


i year. 


Physics. 


JOHN HARLING SCHO- 
LARSHIP, 1900. 


R. H. Gibson, Esq., and R. P. 
Blakeley, Esq., in memory 
of the late John Harling, Esq. 


^5; 

i year. 


Physics. 


PRIZE FOR ESSAY ON THE 
TECHNICAL APPLI- 
CATIONS OF ELEC- 
TRICITY. 


Wm. Mather, Esq., Ed. Hop- 
kinson, Esq., Professor 
Schuster. 


*~ 


Essays on Technical 
Applications of 
Electricity. 



2 DALTON CHEMICAL 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 1855. 

WOODIWIS EXHIBI- 
TION, 1897. 



(') See also the Buckley Scholarship, above. 
CHEMISTRY 0). 

Public subscription in memory 
of John Dalton. 

Bequest of James Woodiwis, 
Esq. 



i year. 



(') See also the Buckley Scholarship, above. 



2 years. 



Research done in the 
College Laboratory. 

Chemistry. 



( '41 ) 

CHEMISTRY continued. 



Name of Scholarship, 
Exhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
and 
General Remarks. 


LEVINSTEIN ORGANIC 
CHEMISTRY EXHIBI- 
TION, 1896 ( : ). 


Ivan Levinstein, Esq. 


-s; 

i year. 


Technical Organic 
Chemistry. 



ASHBURY SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1868. 



RAMSBOTTOM EN- 
TRANCE SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1873. 



TREVITHICK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1888. 



2 ASHBURY 
TIONS, 



EXHIBI- 



FAIRBAIRN ENGINEER- 
ING PRIZE, 1882. 



DALTON NATURAL HIS- 
TORY PRIZE, 1854. 



HARGREAVES MUSICAL 
EXHIBITION, 1896.0 



(') Given from year to year. 

ENGINEERING^). 

James Ashbury, Esq., in memory 

of his father, James Ashbury, 2 years. 
Esq. 

John Ramsbottom, Esq., C.E., 

LL.D. 2 years. 



Subscription in memory of 
Richard Trevithick. 



ios., 
subject to 
increase 
from accu- 
mulations ; 
2 years. 



James Ashbury, Esq. . 

Subscription in memory of Sir 
Wm. Fairbairn, Bart., F.R.S. 

(*) See also the Buckley Scholarship, p. 140. 

NATURAL HISTORY^). 

Public subscription in memory 
of John Dalton. 

(') See also the Buckley Scholarship, p. 140. 

MUSIC AND HARMONY. 

Bequest of James Hargreaves 
under Charity Commissioners' 
Scheme. 



2 years. 



Engineering. 



Physical Science and 
Engineering, open 
only to persons em- 
ployed in L. & N. W. 
Ry. Go's. Locomotive 
Works. 

Engineering. 



Engineering, for even- 
ing students. 

Engineering. 



Zoology, 
Geology, 
tology. 



.Botany, 
Palaeon- 



Harmony and Com- 
position and Execu- 
tive Skill. 



(') Under a former scheme two Hargreaves Musical Scholarships of 1$ each were tenable in the Evening 
Classes from 1884 to 1894 inclusive. 



( '42 ) 
PHYSIOLOGY. 



Name of Scholarship, 
Exhibition, or Prize, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
and 
General Remarks. 


2 ROBERT PLATT 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 1872. 


Robert Platt, Esq., of Dunham 
Hall. 


5; 

2 years. 


Physiology and Com- 
parative Anatomy. 
Scholar to undertake 








research work in 








Physiology. 


2 ROBERT PLATT 
EXHIBITIONS, 1878. 


Founded from Platt Scholar- 
ship Fund. 


About ^15; 
i year. 


Physiology. 


SIDNEY RENSHAW EX- 
HIBITION, 1898. 


Dr. J. W. Renshaw, in memory 
of his son Sidney Renshaw. 


Interest on 
;5- 


Histology and Physio- 
logy. 



2 DAUNTESEY MEDI- 
CAL ENTRANCE 
SCHOLARSH IPS, 

I8 7 8.O 

TURNER MEDICAL 
SCHOLARSHIP, 1872. 



JOHN HENRY AGNEW 
SCHOLARSHIP, 1893. 

DUMVILLE SURGICAL 
PRIZE, 1872. 



MEDICINE. 

Bequest of Mrs. Catherine 
Dauntesey Foxton. 



Subscription in memory of 
Thomas Turner, F.R.C.S. 



Bequest of John Henry Agnew, 
Esq. 

Mrs. Dumville, in memory of 
her husband, Arthur William 
Dumville, Esq. 



^35; 

i year. 



i year. 



30; 

i year. 



Zoology, Botany, and 
Chemistry. 



Medicine, Surgery, etc. 
(including Clinical 
Medicine). 

Diseases of Children. 



Systematic and Prac- 
tical Surgery, etc. 



(') Under a former scheme, revised in 1892, a single Scholarship of loo was awarded annually. 



PHARMACY 
1890. 



PRIZE, 



PHARMACY. 

F. Baden Benger, Esq., W. 
Scott Brown, Esq., J. F. 
Ha worth, Esq., Professor 
Leech, Messrs. Woolley & 
Sons. 



Prize 



First year's Pharmacy 
Courses. 



( 143 ) 



IV. COLLEGE ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND 

EXHIBITIONS ('). 

I. CHIEFLY FOR CLASSICS. 



Name of Scholarship or 
Exhibition, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 

and 
General Remarks. 


ROGERS SCHOLARSHIP, 
1880 (augmented in 
1891). 

SEATON SCHOLARSHIP^) 
1882. 


Mrs. Rogers, in memory of her 
husband, Henry Rogers, 
Esq., M.A., a Governor of 
the College. 

Bequest of James Seaton, Esq. 


j40; 

2 years. 

^40; 
2 years. 


Classics and optional 
subjects. 

Classics and optional 
subjects. 



( J ) The amount of the bequest was ^1,000, to which the College adds the sum necessary to increase the 
annual value to the amount named. 



THEODORES EXHIBI- 



TION, 1895. 



II. FOR MODERN LANGUAGES. 



Bequest of Mrs. Theodores, 
in memory of her husband 
Professor Theodores. 



i year. 



French and German. 



III. CHIEFLY FOR ENGLISH AND HISTORY. 



3 HULME SCHOLAR- I The Charity Commissioners, > .35 ; 



SHIPS, 1892. 



2 JONES HISTORY SCHO- 
LARSHIPS (see p. 139) 



2 JAMES GASKILL 
SCHOLARSHIPS, 1892. 



KAY - SHUTTLEWORTH 
(Sir JAMES PHILLIPS) 
SCHOLARSHIP, 1892. 



under Hulme Trust Estates 
Scheme, revised in 1892. 



3 years. 



English History and 2 
optional subjects. 



IV. FOR SCIENCE GENERALLY. 

Founded under the will of the 
late James Gaskill, Esq. 



The Rt. Hon. Sir Ughtred J. 
Kay-Shuttleworth, Bart, M.P., 
in memory of Sir James 
Phillips Kay-Shuttleworth, 
Bart. 



2 years. 



3 years. 



Mathematics, Me- 
chanics, Chemis- 
try ('). 

Mathematics, Mechan- 
ics, and Chemistry. 
Open to boys from 
certain schools in 
Lancashire and 
Yorkshire. 



(') Credit is given for other subjects. 



(') In addition to the Scholarships, of which details are given, a certain number of 
" Dennison Naylor Scholarships " for boys from Chetham's Hospital, Manchester, will be 
awarded at a future date under the provisions of the will of the late Miss A. J. Naylor. 



( H4 ) 

IV. FOR SCIENCE GENERALLY continued. 



Name of Scholarship or 

Exhibition, and 
Date of Foundation. 



Founded by 



Annual 

Value and 

Tenure. 



Subject 

and 
General Remarks. 



SCHOLARSHIP IN TECH- 
NICAL SCIENCE, 1894. 

RUMNEY SCHOLARSHIP, 
1874. 



An anonymous donor 



Bequest of Robert Rumney, 
Esq. 



25; 
3 years. 

40; 
3 years. 



Mathematics, Mechan- 
ics, and Chemistry. 

Awarded on result of 
May Government 
Science Examina- 
tions. Open only to 
artisan members of 
Institutes belonging 
to the Lancashire 
and Cheshire Union 
of Institutes. 



2 DALTON SCHOLAR- 

SHIPS ('), 1854 

(scheme revised 



CARTWRIGHT SCHOLAR- 
SHIP ('), 1895. 



V. CHIEFLY FOR MATHEMATICS. 



Public subscription in memory 
of John Dalton. 



Portion of a fund bequeathed 
by Francis Cartwright, Esq., 
under a scheme of the 
Charity Commissioners. 



40; 
2 years. 



3 years. 



Mathematics and op- 
tional subjects. 



Mathematics and op- 
tional subjects. 



(') Either a Cartwright or a Dalton Scholarship is offered each year. 

VI. FOR ENGINEERING. 
RAMSBOTTOM SCHOLARSHIP (see p. 141). 



CRACE CALVERT SCHO- 
LARSHIP, 1876 ('). 



Bequest of 
Calvert. 



VII. FOR CHEMISTRY. 
Dr. F. Crace 



for ! Theoretical and Practi- 
2 years. cal Chemistry. 



(*) This Scholarship was formerly open only to students in the Evening Classes. The scheme was 
rerised recently, and the Scholarship is now an Entrance Scholarship open only to students at the Manchester 
Municipal Technical School, or the Royal Technical Institute, Salford. 



PHARMACY EXHIBITION, 
1890. 



VIII. FOR PHARMACY. 



F. Baden Benger, Esq., W. 
Scott Brown, Esq., J. F. 
Haworth, Esq., Professor 
Leech, and Messrs. Woolley 
and Sons. 



Elementary Botany and 
Chemistry. 



IX. FOR GENERAL PROFICIENCY. 



Name of Scholarship or 
Exhibition, and 
Date of Foundation. 


Founded by 


Annual 
Value and 
Tenure. 


Subject 
and 
General Remarks. 


DORA MUIR SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1899 (for 
Female Candidates). 


Alexander Muir, Esq., in 
memory of his daughter, 
the late Mrs. Alfred Haworth. 


25; 
3 years. 


V 


BLEACKLEY SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1898. 


Bequest of the late E. O. 
Bleackley, Esq. 


3 years. 




2 DAY TRAINING EX- 
HIBITIONS (for Male 
and Female Candi- 
dates respectively). 


A number of anonymous donors 


i year. 


For these Scholarships 
Candidates may 
select any of the 
papers set for the 
other Entrance 


ALICE FAY EXHIBITION 


, / 


15; 


Scholarships. 


(for Female Candi- 
dates). 

WILLIAM SIMPSON EX- 
HIBITION (for Male 
Candidates), 1886. 


Bequest of Mrs. Alice Fay, 
under scheme of Charity- 
Commissioners, 1894. 

V 


i year, 
i year. 





X. SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED BY OTHER INSTITUTIONS AND TENABLE 

AT THE OWENS COLLEGE. 



3 MANCHESTER GRAM- 
MAR SCHOOL EN- 
TRANCE SCHOLAR- 
SHIPS, 1862. 



12 MANCHESTER COR- 
PORATION TECHNICAL 
SCHOLARSHIPS. 

BURNLEY CORPORATION 
TECHNICAL SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. 

HUGH MASON SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. 



MCK.ERROW SCHOLAR- 
SHIP. 



A Committee 



The Manchester Corporation 



The Burnley Corporation . 



The late Hugh Mason, Esq., 
M.P. 



3 years. 



3 years. 



3 years. 



2 years. 



3 years. 



Mathematics and 
English Essay, 
together with 
Classics and Physical 
Science in alternate 
years. 



Technical subjects 
open to children of 
ratepayers. 



Open to pupils at 
Albion Higher Grade 
School, Ashton- 
under-Lyne. 

Open to candidates for 
Presbyterian Ministry. 



X. SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED BY OTHER INSTITUTIONS AND TENABLE AT THE 

OWENS COLLEGE continued. 



Name of Scholarship or 

Exhibition, and 
Date of Foundation. 



Founded by 



Annual 

Value and 

Tenure. 



Subject 

and 
General Remarks. 



THURSBY SCHOLARSHIP, 
1889. 



FOLDS SCHOLARSHIP, 
1889. 

WHITAKER SCHOLAR- 
SHIP, 1891. 



HEGINBOTTOM EXHIBI- 
TION, 1879. 

TITUS TETLOW EXHIBI- 
TION, 1896. 

2 PLATT LOCAL EX- 
HIBITIONS. 



Sir J. H. Thursby, Bart., in 
memory of ' Rev. William 
Thursby. 

J. Langfield Ward, Esq., and 
Mrs. Ward, in memory of 
J. Folds, Esq. 

Alfred Master-Whitaker, Esq., 
and Mrs. Master-Whitaker, 
in memory of Thomas Hor- 
dern Whitaker, Esq. 

The Trustees of the late George 
Heginbottom, Esq. 

The Trustees of the late Titus 
Tetlow, Esq. 

Mrs. Platt, widow of the late 
John Platt, Esq. M.P. 



3 years. 



40; 
3 years. 

5, 
3 years. 

5; 

2 years. 



Open to boys at the 
Burnley Grammar 
School. 



Open to students at 
Ashton - under- Lyne 
Mechanics' Institute. 



Open to students of the 
Municipal Technical 
School, Oldham. 



XL SCHOLARSHIPS OFFERED BY COUNTY COUNCIL TECHNICAL IN- 
STRUCTION COMMITTEES TENABLE AT THE OWENS COLLEGE 
AS WELL AS AT OTHER COLLEGES. 

Lancashire County Council Science Scholarships . . f>o, 3 years. 

,, ,, Commercial Scholarships . . 60, 

Musical Scholarships . . 60, 

Cheshire Scholarships . . College fees and travelling expenses. 

West Riding of Yorkshire County Council Scholarships . 60, 2 years. 

North . 60, i year. 

Staffordshire County Council Scholarships .... 60, i year. 

Norfolk . 50, 2 years. 

Derbyshire . 30, 

Durham 

Somerset 



Cumberland 



I Varying amounts and ten- 

( ures. 



XIIL-Portraits and other Works of Art 
in the Possession of the College. 

The works of art in the possession of the College consist chiefly 
of portraits, of which a list is given below. 

The College also possesses the following : 

Three large cartoons by William Dyce, R.A., for frescoes executed 
by him in the House of Lords. Subjects : Generosity, Courtesy, and 
Hospitality. Presented in 1866, by Mrs. Dyce, through William Agnew, 
Esq. 

Thirteen cartoons by Ford Madox Brown. Subjects : Homer, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Alfred the Great, Roger Bacon, Joan of Arc, Columbus, 
Michelangelo, Francis Bacon, Shakspere, Newton, Cavendish, Beethoven. 
Presented in 1880, by Charles Rowley, Junr., Esq. 

Three pen and ink sketches, in one frame, and a water-colour sketch, 
by John Ruskin. Presented by William .Walker, Esq. (Lecturer in Drawing 
at the College from 1863 to 



Reproductions of Turner's Liber Studiorum, presented by William 
Walker, Esq. 

Large bas-relief, marble, by Harry Bates, A.R.A. Subject : Socrates 
teaching in the Agora. Presented in 1885 by A. Waterhouse, Esq., R.A. 
(In the Council Chamber.) 

(') Mr. Walker also gave to the College a valuable collection of casts from the antique. 



148 



LIST OF PORTRAITS ('). 



Subject. 



Description. 



Artist and 
Date of the Work. 



Donor and 
Date of Donation. 



JOHN PARTINGTON ASTON, 
first Secretary to the 
Owens Trustees. 

THOMAS BARKER, M.A., 
Emeritus Professor. 

CHARLES FREDERICK BEYER, 
C.E., late Governor of 
the College. 



RICHARD COPLEY CHRISTIE, 
M.A., Emeritus Professor. 

ROBERT BELLAMY CLIFTON, 
M.A., F.R.S., former 
Professor. 

C. J. CULLINGWORTH, M.D., 

former Professor. 
JOHN DALTON, F.R.S. 



Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Bronze bust . 

Oil painting . 

Oil painting . 

Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Oil painting . 

Oil painting . 

Drawing , 

Mezzotint En- 
graving. 

Engraving 

Marble bust . 



J. W. Swinnerton, 
1884. 



T. B. Kennington, 
1899. 



VV. Bradley . . . 



Unknown . . . 

J. Lonsdale, and 
August, 1825. 

C. Turner, A.R.A., 
from a painting by 
J. Lonsdale. 

Worthington, from 
apainting by Allen. 

H. Cardwell, 1840 



The Council. 



The Staff. 



Executed by order of the 
Court of Governors. 



Professor A. Milnes 
Marshall. 

Some of Mr. Christie's 
former colleagues, 1899. 

The Staff. 



Professor Cullingworth. 

Richard Johnson, Esq., 
1864. 

Professor Dixon. 

A. L. Tate, Esq., 1895 



James Collier Harter, 
Esq., 1854. 



(') The Editor regrets that in a number of cases he has been unable to ascertain full details 
with regard to the portraits mentioned. 



( 149 ) 



Subject. 



Description. 



Artist and 
Date of the Work. 



Donor and 
Date of Donation. 



CHARLES JAMES DARBI- 
SHIRE, Esq. 

DEVONSHIRE, WILLIAM 
CAVENDISH, K.G., jih 
DUKE OF, late President 
of the College. 

MICHAEL FARADAY, lecturing 
at the Royal Institution. 

GEORGE FAULKNER, first 
Chairman of the Owens 
Trustees. 



JOHN FREDERICK FOSTER, 
one of the Owens Trus- 
tees. 

Sir EDWARD FRANKLAND, 
K.C.B., F.R.S., former 
Professor. 



ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., 
F.R.S., Emeritus Professor. 



Mrs. GASKELL 



JAMES GASKILL (Founder 
of Scholarships). 

JOSEPH GOUGE GREENWOOD, 
LL.D., former Principal 
and Emeritus Professor. 



Pencil drawing 



Large photo- 
graph. 



Print . 

Oil painting, 
three - quart- 
ers. 

Photograph . 
Engraving 

Marble medal- 
lion. 

Photograph . 
Photograph . 

Marble bust . 



Alexander Blaikley, 
1855- 

Benjamin Rawlin- 
son Faulkner, 
1838. 

Alfred Brothers 

C. Agar, from a 
painting by G. 
Patten, A.R.A. 

John Adams- Acton, 
1896. 



A Committee, 1883. 



F. J. Faraday, Esq., 1898. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Faulkner, 
widow of George Faulk- 
ner, 1878. 

The Artist. 
Principal A. J. Scott. 

Sir E. Frankland, 1896. 



Photograph 



Oil painting, 
three-quarter 

length. 

Marble bust . 



Marble " Her- 
mes " bust. 



Replica by Hamo 
Thorn ycroft, R. A., 
of a bust executed 
in 1831 by D. 
Dun bar. 



J. H. E. Partington 



E. Onslow Ford, 
R.A. 

J. W. Swinnerton . 



Professor Gamgee. 



The Misses Gaskcll. 



Mr. Gaskill's Trustees. 



The Teaching Staff, 1882. 



The Associates, 1890. 



C. J. Heywood, Esq., 
1898. 



Subject. 



Description. 



Artist and 
Date of the Work. 



Donor and 
Date of Donation. 



HERMAN HAGER, Ph.D., 
former Lecturer. 

JOHN HOPKINSON, D.Sc., 
F.R.S., former Associate. 

WILLIAM JACK, M.A..LL.D., 
former Professor. 



W. STANLEY JEVONS, LL.D., 
F.R.S., former Professor. 

THOMAS JORDAN, F.R.C.S. 



Rt. Rev. JAMES PRINCE 
LEE, first Bishop of Man- 
chester. 

EDWARD LUND, F.R.C.S., 
former Emeritus Professor. 



ARTHUR MILNES MAR- 
SHALL, M.D., D.Sc., 
F.R.S., former Professor. 

J. E. MORGAN, M.A., M.D., 
former Emeritus Pro- 
fessor. 

J. E. CRAWFORD MUNRO, 
LL.D., former Professor. 

ALFRED NEILD, Esq., Trea- 
surer of the College, 
1871-1889. 

J. HOLME NICHOLSON, 
M.A., former Registrar of 
the College and of the 
Victoria University. 

JOHN OWENS, Founder of 
the College. 



Photograph . 

Oil painting . 

Photograph . 

Oil painting . 

Marble bust . 

Oil painting . 

Marble bust . 

Oil painting, 
three-quarter 
length. 

Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Oil painting . 

Photograph. 



Marble medal- 
lion. 



T. B. Kennington, 
1891. 



- Stuart, 1873 . 

E. Roscoe Mullins, 
1883. 



Matthew Noble, 
1873- 



J. H. E. Partington, 
1883. 



Hubert von Herko- 
mer, R.A., 1889. 



T. Woolner, R.A., 
(from a silhouette 
portrait taken 
March 26th, 1822). 



The Staff. 



A few former Students 
of the College, 1898. 

The Staff. 



Committee of Friends, 

1873- 

Committee of Sub- 
scribers, 1884. 

William Langton, Esq., 
1876. 

Committee of Sub- 
scribers. 



Committee of Pupils and 
Medical Friends, 1883. 



The Staff. 



The Staff. 



The Staff. 



The Court of Governors, 
1889. 



The Staff. 



Mrs. Elizabeth Faulkner, 
by bequest, 1878. 



Subject. 



Description. 



Artist and 
Date of the Work. 



Donor and 
Date of Donation. 



JOHN OWENS, Founder of 
the College. 

OWEN OWENS, Father of 
John Owens. 

ROBERT PLATT (Founder of 
the Platt Scholarships). 

Sir H. E. ROSCOE, F.R.S., 
Emeritus Professor. 



JOHN RYLANDS, Esq., J.P. . 

ARCHIBALD SANDEMAN, 
M.A., former Professor. 

CARL SCHORLEMMER, 
LL.D., F.R.S., former 
Professor. 

A. J. SCOTT, M.A., former 
Principal. 

THE SENATE, 1862-3 



1872-3 . . 

JOHN BENJAMIN SMITH, 
M.P. 



Marble statue, 
full length. 



Harry Bates, 
A.R.A. 1886. 



Oil painting 



Oil painting . 

Marble medal- 
lion. 

Lithograph 

Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Marble bust . 

Photograph . 

Photograph . 

Marble bust . 



J. E. Burgess, 1887. 



John Adams-Acton, 
1897. 

H. Hill. 



Purchased. 



George Faulkner, Esq. 



Mrs. Platt. 



The Professors and Lec- 
turers of the College, 
1887. 

Sir H. E. Roscoe, 1897. 



H. S. Leifchild . 
John Eastham . . 

Alfred Brothers 
John Adams-Acton 



Dr. ROBERT ANGUS SMITH, 
F.R.S. 

GEORGE SOUTHAM, F.R.C.S., 
former Professor. 



BALFOUR STEWART, LL.D., 
F.R.S., former Professor. 



Plaster bust 



Oil painting 
three- quarter 
length. 

Photograph . 



H. Measham 



The Staff. 



Professor H. B. Dixon. 



Committee of Past and 
Present Students, 1860. 

The Day Students of the 
College, 1863. 

The Artist. 

Sir Edwin Durning-Law- 
rence, Bart., M.P., Lady 
Durning-Lawrence, and 
Miss J. Durning Smith 
(his son-in-law and 
daughters), 1881. 

B. A. Joule, Esq., 1895. 



F. A. Sou t ham, Esq., 
1878. 



The Staff. 



( '5* ) 



Subject. 



Description. 



Artist and 
Date of the Work. 



Donor and 
Date of Donation. 



TOBIAS THEODORES, former 
Emeritus Professor. 

JOHN THORBURN, M.D., 
former Professor. 

ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD, 
Litt.D., LL.D., former 
Principal, Emeritus Pro- 
fessor. 

Sir J. WHITWORTH, Bart., 
F.R.S., former Governor 
of the College. 



WILLIAM CRAWFORD WIL- 
LIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S., 
former Emeritus Pro- 
fesssor. 

WILLIAM HYDE WOLLAS- 
TON, P.R.S. 



Photograph . 
Photograph . 



Oil painting, 
three-quarter 
length. 



Marble medal- 
lion. 



Lithograph. 

Oil painting, 
head 



Mezzotint en- 
graving. 



Hubert von Her- 
komer, R.A., 1898. 



T. Woolner, R.A., 
1889. 



Alfred Brothers 



W. Ward, A.R.A., 
from a painting by 
J. Jackson, R.A., 
1824. 



The Staff. 



The Staff. 



Committee of Sub- 
scribers, 1898. 



Executed by order of the 
Council, 1889. 



The Artist. 



George Hyde Wollaston, 
Esq., 1899. 



( 153 ) 



XIV, The Associates. 



In 1858, on the initiative of Professor R. C. Christie, it was decided to 
afford former students an opportunity of maintaining their connection with 
the College by the enrolment of a body of Associates. 

The requirements demanded from Candidates for the Associateship Requirement* 
have varied, but not very greatly, from time to time. According to the Associateship. 
present regulations Candidates for the Associateship must (i) have been 
students in regular attendance at a certain minimum number of lectures 
at College for three Sessions, and (2) have obtained a University degree 
or other similar qualification accepted by the Senate^ 1 ) 

Each Associate pays a fee of one guinea on election, of which half 
is paid to a Fund entirely controlled by the Associates and called " The 
Associates' Fund." 

By the Acts of Parliament of 1870, 1871, and 1899 the Associates Privileges 
have been given a share in the government of the College. They at Associates, 
present elect four members of the Court. (See note, pp. 23-4.) They are 
admitted to lectures in the Departments which they have attended, without 
fee, and have certain other College privileges. 

The Associates elect a Chairman and Committee, and meet at least Annual 

Meeting, 

once annually. Election of 

Officers. 

CHAIRMEN OF THE ASSOCIATES. 

1872-73. RICHARD MARSDEN PANKHURST, LL.D. 
1873-74. EDWIN RAYNER, M.D., B.A. 

(') Provision is made for the election of former distinguished students who may not have 
fulfilled to the letter these conditions, but only very few (five) Associates have been elected 
under this provision. 



( '54 ) 

1874-75- Rev - ELKANAH ARMITAGE, M.A.^) 

1875-76. Rev. CHARLES THOMAS POYNTING B.A.(*) 

1876-77. CHARLES SHELDON, D.Lit., M.A., B.Sc. 

1877-78. ALFRED HOPKINSON, Q.C., M.A., B C.L.( S ) 

1878-79. RICHARD THOMAS WRIGHT, M.A. 

1879-80. JOHN HOPKINSON, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S.( 4 ) 

1880-81. THOMAS EDWARD THORPE, Ph.D., F.R.S.( 5 ) 

1881-82. FREDERICK MORRISH PIERCE, M.D. 

1882-83. Professor JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

1883-84. PERCY WILLIAM BUNTING, M.A.( 6 ) 

1884-85. HENRY SPENSER WILKINSON, M.A. 

1885-86. WILLIAM HENRY RHODES, M.A. 

1886-87. ARCHIBALD PRENTICE LEDWARD, B.Sc. 

1887-88. WILLIAM BARTON WORTHINGTON, B.Sc.( 7 ) 

1888-89. CHAS. HUGHES, B.A.( 8 ) 

1889-90. EDWARD JOHN BROADFIELD, B.A.( 9 ) 

1890-91. SAMUEL BUCKLEY, M.D. 

1891-92. CHARLES HOPKINSON, B.Sc. 

1892-93. ALFRED ERNEST STEINTHAL, M.A.( 10 ) 

1893-94. WM. THORBURN, M.D., B.Sc., B.S., F.R.C.S. 

1894-95. ALFRED JOHN KING, B.Sc. 

1895-96. ) Professor DANIEL J OHN LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P.( n ) 

1896-97. ) 

1897-98. ARTHUR HENRY WORTHINGTON, B.A.( 12 ) 

1898-99. THOMAS HARRIS, M.D., F.R.C.P.("). 

1899-1900. EDWARD HOPKINSON, D.Sc.( M ). 



{') Professor of Apologetics in the Yorkshire United Independent College, Bradford. 

( 2 ) Clerk of Convocation, Victoria University, 1880-91. 

( 3 ) Now Principal of the College. 

( 4 ) Awarded Royal Medal of the Royal Society (1890). Former President of the Institution of Electrical 

Engineers; deceased 1898. 
(*) Foreign Secretary of the Royal Society ; President of the Chemical Society ; Principal of the Government 

Laboratory, Somerset House. 
(') Editor of the Contemporary Review. 

(') Chief Engineer, Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company. 
(*) Chairman of Convocation, Victoria University, 1890-93. 

(*) Member of the Court and Council of the College ; Vice-Chairman of the Manchester School Board. 
0) Late Fellow of Trinity College, Cambridge; Clerk of Convocation, Victoria University. 
(") Chairman of Convocation, Victoria University, 1893-96. 
(") Clerk of Convocation, Victoria University, 1891-98. 
(") Physician to the Manchester Royal Infirmary, Lecturer in the College. 
( 14 ) Late Fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge. 



( '55 ) 



XV.-Record of Original Publications 



BY 



Members of the Various Departments of the College, 

1851 1900. 



PRELIMINARY NOTE. 

THE object of this Record is to convey a more accurate idea of the original work 
in the various Departments of the College than could be done otherwise. The 
Record is necessarily imperfect ; a complete bibliography would have increased the 
labour of compilation out of all proportion to its value for the present purpose, and 
could not have been completed within reasonable limits of time ; but it is hoped that 
the names of persons and of works of importance omitted are few in number ('). 

The majority of the lists of books and memoirs of living authors have been 
supplied by themselves at the Editor's request. Where no list has been forthcoming, 
and in the case of deceased persons, the list has been drawn up from such sources as 
were available. All obviously erroneous, or doubtful, references have been verified. 

The following rules have been observed, as far as practicable : 

1. The lists are intended to include only works written by their authors 
during their connection with the College ( 2 ). In a few cases the date of publication 
is notably subsequent to the cessation of that connection. 

2. The titles are roughly classified under subject-headings, according to the 
scheme given below, but the works of any one author are given as a rule in a single 

(') Reference may be made to Thompson's The Owens College, Appendices V. and VI., for a list of 
Principal Scott's Works (nearly all of them published before he was appointed Principal), and for a list of 
published and unpublished addresses by various other members of the College, of which only a few of the 
more important are included in the present Record. Some of the latter were printed in a volume of Essays 
and Addresses by Professors and Lecturers of the Owens College, edited by Professors BALFOUR STEWART and 
A. W. WARD. Macmillan & Co., 1874. 

f 2 ) This rule has been departed from only in the case of History, an exception justified by the fact that the 
post-graduate student in History is frequently forced to travel in order to find his material. 



( 156 ) 

list, with cross-references where necessary. Where, however, the author has held 
posts in two distinct departments of the College (e.g., History and Literature, 
Pharmacology and Medicine) his works are divided under the corresponding heads. 

3. Proper names quoted are those generally used by the owners ; names are 
given in full, as a rule, in the index. Distinctions other than degrees, quoted previously 
in the book, are not repeated in the Record. 

4. In the case of a conjoint paper of which both authors were members of the 
College, the names are quoted in the order in which they appear in the original 
publication, with a cross-reference from the second name. Where only one of the 
authors was a member of the College, his name has been placed first (without 
reference to the order in the original publication), and the two names are connected 
by the phrase " in conjunction with." No cross-reference is then given from the 
second name ; but all names are included in the index. 

5. Books (with names of publishers) are quoted at the head of each list in 
chronological order, and are followed by contributions to periodicals, encyclopaedias, 
etc., in chronological order, with date in each case. 

6. Where references to transactions of societies or periodicals contain both the 
number of a volume (printed in thick type) and a date, the date is that at which the 
paper was read or published, and does not necessarily correspond with that on the 
title-page of the volume referred to. Where references contain a date only, this is 
generally sufficient to designate the volume referred to. 

7. The names of periodicals and transactions have been somewhat less 
abbreviated than usual, so as to-avoid the necessity for a long index of abbreviations. 
The following will probably suffice : 

Ber. for Berichte der deutschen chemischen Gesellschaft, Berlin. 

Bezzenbergers Beitrdge for Beitrdge zur Kunde der indo-germanischcn Sprachen, 
herausgegeben von Dr. Ad. Bezzenberger, und Dr. W. Prellwitz, Gbttingen. 

Kuhns Zeitschrift for Zeitschrift fiir vergleichende Sprachforschung begrundet 
von A. Kuhn, Giitersloh. 

Manchester Memoirs for Memoirs (and Memoirs and Proceedings) of the Man- 
chester Literary and Philosophical Society. (The title originally and at 
present used is Manchester Memoirs?) 

Phil. Trans, for Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 

The Editor is greatly indebted to several of his colleagues for help of various 
kinds and for various suggestions. Professor Young kindly supplied almost the 
entire section on Anatomy, and in accordance with his desire this section has been 



( 157 ) 

kept distinct from that on Natural History. Great use has also been made of the 
lists in Sir Henry Roscoe's Record of Work Done in the Chemical Department of 
the Owens College, 1857-1887 (privately printed). 

It may be well to point out, finally, (what is obvious to the expert) that the 
apparent disproportion between lists of work belonging to the Arts Department of 
the College, and those belonging to Science and Medicine, is in a considerable 
measure due to differences in methods of publication. 

The lists are classified under the following subject headings (see 2. above) : 

PAGE. 

I. CLASSICS, AND PHILOLOGY GENERALLY 157 

II. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 160 

III. HISTORY . 161 

IV. PHILOSOPHY AND ECONOMICS 164 

V. GEOGRAPHY 168 

VI. EDUCATION 168 

VII. BIBLIOGRAPHY 169 

VIII. HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPOSITION 170 

IX. MATHEMATICS, PHYSICS, AND ENGINEERING 170 

X. CHEMISTRY 182 

XI. NATURAL HISTORY (including ZOOLOGY, BOTANY, and GEOLOGY) . 204 

XII. ANATOMY 216 

XIII. PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY 219 

XIV. MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY, AND THERAPEUTICS. . . 222 

XV. PATHOLOGY, MORBID ANATOMY, AND BACTERIOLOGY . . . 224 

XVI. MEDICINE AND SURGERY (including DENTAL SURGERY) . . . 229 



I. CLASSICS, AND PHILOLOGY GENERALLY. 

H. BREYMANN, Ph.D. 

La Dime de Pt?nitance. Bibliothek des Literarischen Vereins in Stuttgard. 1874. 
A French Grammar on Philological Principles. Macmillan and Co. 1874. 
On Provencal Literature in Old and in Modern Times. In Essays and Addresses by 
Professors and Lecturers of the Owens College. Macmillan and Co. 1874. 

E. B. ENGLAND, Litt.D. 

Edition of Euripides's Iphigenia Taurica. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1883 ; 

and edition, 1897. 

Edition of Euripides's Iphigenia Aulica. Macmillan and Co. 1891. 
(See also A. S. WILKINS.) 



( 158 ) 

Principal J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D. 

Translation of the Pneumatics of Hero of Alexandria, with Preface. [Edited by 

Bennet Woodcroft] Charles Whittingham. 1851. 

Elements of Greek Grammar. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1857 ; 4th edition, 1880. 
(See also EDUCATION, p. 169.) 

HERMAN HAGER, Ph.D. 

On the Eisangelia. Journ. of Phil. 4. 1872 

Theophrastus irtpl No/now. Journ. of Phil., 6. 1876. 

Many articles on Greek Law in Sir W. Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Latin Antiquities, 

3rd edition. 1890-91. 

Scheffel's Ekkehard, edited with notes. 1890. (And other School Texts.) 
And various contributions to the Journal of Philology. 

E. G. W. HEWLETT, M.A. 

The Articular Infinitive in Polybius. American Journ. of Phil., 11. 1890. 

Professor ARWID JOHANNSON, M.A. 

Tyska stilofningar med ledning af svenska texter jamte fortlopande kommentar. Bille, 
Stockholm. 1898. 

SIDNEY GEORGE OWEN, M.A. 

Ovid : Tristia, Book I. The text revised, with an Introduction and Notes, by S. G. 

Owen. Oxford, Clarendon Press. 1885. 
P Ovidi Nasonis Tristium libri V. Recensuit S. G. Owen. Oxonii e Typographeo 

Clarendoneano. 1889. 
Ovid: Tristia, Book III. With an Introduction and Notes by S. G. Owen. Oxford: 

Clarendon Press. 1889. 
And many contributions to the Classical Review. 

Rev. L. M. SIMMONS, B.A., LL.B. 

The Letter of Consolation of Maimun ben Joseph. Arabic text, with English translation and 
notes. Jewish Quart. Review. 1891. (Also published separately with additions.) 

The Talmudical Law of Agency compared with the English and Roman Law. Jewish 
Quart. Review 1896. 

Professor JOHN STRACHAN, M.A., LL.D. 

Edition of Herodotus, Book VI. Macmillan and Co. 1891. 

Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus. Edited in conjunction with Dr. WHITLEY STOKES. Camb. 

University Press. In the Press. 
Keltic Notes. Bezzenbergers Beitrdge, 13. 1888. 
Postverbal Aspiration in Irish. Bezzenbergers Beitrdge, 15. 1890. 
The Compensatory Lengthening of Vowels in Irish. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. Reprinted 

in Bezzenbergers Beitrdge, 20. 1892. 
Etymologien. Kuhns Zeitschrift, 33. 1893. 



( 159 ) 

Professor JOHN STRACHAN, M.A., LL.D. continued. 

The Deponent Verb in Irish. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. 1894. 

The Verbal System of the Saltair na Rann. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. 1895. 

The Particle ro in Irish. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. 1896. 

The Subjunctive Mood in Irish. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. 1897. 

Notes on the Milan Glosses. Revue Celtique, 19. 1897. 

The Notes and Glosses in the Lebor na Huidre. Archiv fur Celt. Phil., 1. 1898. 

The so-called Absolute Form of the Irish Imperfect. Celtische Zeitschr., 2. 1898. 

Grammatical Notes. Celtische Zeitschr., 2. 1899. 

The Substantive Verb in the Old Irish Glosses. Trans. Land. Phil. Soc. 1899. 

Final Vowels in the Fe'lire Oenguso. Revue Celtique, 20. 1899. 

An Indo-Germanic Word Arrangement. Kuhns Zeitschrift, 35. 1899. 

W. C. SUMMERS, M.A. 

Persii Satirae, a critical text ; in Postgate's Corpus Poetarum Latinorum. G. Bell and Co. 
And contributions to the Classical Review. 

Professor T. THEODORES. 

The Talmud. In Essays and Addresses by Professors and Lecturers of the Owens College . 
Macmillan and Co. 1874. 

A. VALGIMIGLI. 

Survey of Italian Literature, XII-XIX century (in English). Johann Thiel, Manchester. 

1892. 

Dante at Oxford : an article. Giornale Dantesco, Rome, Anno II. Quad. VI. 1894. 
L' Insegnamento technico-commerciale in Inghilterra. La Rassegna Naziona/e, Florence, 95. 

1897. 
II culto di Dante in Inghilterra. Giornale Dantesco, Rome, Anno VI. (republished by 

L. Olschki). Florence. 1898. 

Professor A. S. WILKINS, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. 

Ciceronis de Oratore Libri Tres. Text with an English critical and explanatory commentary, 

3 vols. Clarendon Press, Oxford. Vol. 1, ist edition 1879, 3rd edition 1895. 

Vol. 2, ist edition 1880, 2nd edition 1890. Vol. 3, 1892. 
Articles on the Greek Language and Latin Language, and other articles in the 

Encyclopedia Britannica, gth edition. 
Editions of Cicero's Catiline Orations (1869), and Pro Lege Manilla (1879). Macmillan 

and Co. 
Edition of Horace's Epistles, and Ars Poetica. Macmillan and Co. ist edition 1885 ; 

4th edition 1892. 

Primer of Roman Antiquities. Macmillan and Co. 1885. 
Primer of Roman Literature. Macmillan and Co. 1890. 
Numerous articles, chiefly on Roman Antiquities, in Sir W. Smith's Dictionarv of 

Greek and Roman Antiquities, 3rd edition. 1890-1. 
Contributions to the Journal of Philology, Classical Review, Academy, British Quarterly 

Review, etc. 



( 1 60 ) 

Professor A. S. WILKINS, and E. B. ENGLAND, Litt.D. 

Translation of Georg Curtius's Principles of Greek Etymology, (a vols.) John Murray. 

ist edition, 1875-6 ; and edition, 1886. 
Translation of Georg Curtius's Greek Verb. John Murray. 1886. 



II. ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

J. W. CUNLIFFE, Litt.D. 

The Influence of Seneca on Elizabethan Tragedy. Macmillan and Co. 1893. 

OLIVER ELTON, M.A. 

Editions of Comus and some other Minor Poems of Milton. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 

1891. 
The first nine books of Saxo Grammaticus translated. Folklore Society and D. Nutt. 

1894. 

An Introduction to Michael Drayton. Spenser Society's Publications, Manchester. 1895. 
The Augustan Ages. Blackwood, Periods of European Literature. 1899. 
Dramatic Notices contributed to The Manchester Stage, 1880-1900. A. Constable 

and Co. 1900. 
And various critical articles. 

FRED HARSLEV, M.A., Ph.D. 

Edition of Eadwine's Canterbury Psalter. With introduction and notes. Early 
English Text Society's Publications. 1889. 

C. H. HERFORD, Litt.D., now Professor in the University College of Wales, Aberystwyth. 

Studies in the Literary Relations of England and Germany in the Sixteenth Century. 

Clay and Sons. 1886. 

Goethe and Calderon. Abstracted in Proc. of Manch. Goethe Soc., 1. 1886. 
Greene's Romances and Shakespeare. Trans. New Shakespere Soc. 1888. 
Browning's Prince Hohensteil-Schwangau. Trans. Browning Soc. 1887. 

URSULA HOLME, M.A., now Assistant at Mason College. 

Glossary to Introduction to Browne's Religio Medici. Part of dissertation submitted for 
Degree. Dent and Co., Temple Classics. 1897. 

ERNEST WOOD RHODES, M.A. 

Edition of Defensor's Liber Scintillarum, with an interlinear Anglo-Saxon version, made 
early in the Eleventh Century; with introduction and glossary. Early English 
Text Society's Publications. 1889. 



Professor T. N. TOLLER, M.A. 

Edition of Bosworth's Anglo-Saxon Dictionary. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1882-98. 
Edition of Correspondence of Edward, 3rd Earl of Derby. Chetham Society's Publications, 

Manchester. 1890. 
Outlines of the History of the English Language. Cambridge University Press. In 

the Press. 

i 

ERNEST WALDER, B.A. 

Shakesperian Criticism in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Thos. Brear and 
Co. , Bradford. 1895. 

Professor ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD, M.A., Litt.D., LL.D. 

Introductory Memoir, etc., to the Globe edition of Pope's Poetical Works. Macmillan and 

Co. 1869. 2nd edition, 1898. 

Introduction to Marlowe's Faustus and Greene's Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay. Claren- 
don Press, Oxford, ist edition, 1878 ; 3rd edition, 1892. 
A History of English Dramatic Literature to the Death of Queen Anne. Macmillan and Co. 

ist edition (2 vols.), 1875 ; 2nd edition (3 vols.), 1899. 
Chaucer. Macmillan and Co., English Men of Letters Series. 1880. 
Dickens. Macmillan and Co., English Men of Letters Series. 1882. 
Introduction to John Heywood's The Spider and the Flie. Spenser Society's Publications, 

Manchester. 1 894. 
Introduction to the Poems of John Byrom. Chetham Society's Publications, Manchester. 

1894-5. 
Introduction to Thos. Heywood's A Woman Killed with Kindness. Dent and Co., Temple 

Dramatists Series. 1897. 
Article on the Drama (1870), and other contributions to the Encyclopedia Britannica, 

9th edition. 
(See also HISTORY, p. 164.) 

LILIAN WINSTANLEY, B.A. (now Assistant Lecturer in English at University College of Wales, 
Aberystwyth). 

Dissertation on Spenser and Puritanism, etc., accepted as qualifying for Victoria 
University Fellowship. To be published in the Modern Quarterly. 



III. HISTORY.C) 

THOMAS BATESON, M.A. 

The Relations of Defoe and Harley. English Historical Review, 15. 1900. 

ALICE M. COOKE, M.A. 

The Settlement of the Cistercians in England. English Historical Review, 8. 1893. 

(') See p. 155, note 2. 



( 162 ) 

ALICE M. COOKE, M.A. continued. 

Biography of Richard Peacock and minor contributions to the Dictionary of National 

Biography. 1894-1900. 
Anglia Sacra : a map showing the Principal Religious Houses in the time of Henry 

VIII., together with the Dioceses formed after their Suppression. In Poole's 

Historical Atlas of Modern Europe. 1897. 

Professor W. A. COPINGER and ROBERT DAY. 

New Edition of Smith's History of Cork. Guy and Co.,.Ltd. 1893. 
(See also BIBLIOGRAPHY, p. 169.) 

ROBERT DUNLOP, M.A. 

Life of Henry Grattan. Allen and Co. London. 1889. 

The Plantation of Munster. English Historical Review, 3. 1888. 

Life of Daniel O'Connell. Heroes of the Nations Series. In the Press. 

Ireland to the Plantation of Ulster. In preparation for Cambridge Hist, of Modern 

Europe, 3. 

The Plantation of Leix and Ofifaly. English Historical Review, 6. 1891. 
Biographies of the Fitzgerald family (i6th and iyth certturies), of the Clan of O'Neill 

(including Conn, Hugh, Sir Phelim, and Shane), and other biographies chiefly of 

Irishmen (169 articles in all). Dictionary of National Biography. 1888-1900. 
Maps of (i.) Ireland under the early Tudors; (2.) Ireland from 1541 to 1653. In 

Poole's Historical Atlas of Modern Europe. 1897-8. 

WALTER EUSTACE RHODES, M.A. 

Edmund, Earl of Lancaster. English Historical Review, 10. 1895. 

Inventory of the Jewels and Wardrobe of Queen Isabella (1307-8). English Historical 

Review, 12. 1897. 
Biographies of Peter des Roches, Robert de Ros (d. 1227), and Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, 

and twenty-seven minor contributions to the Dictionary of National Biography. 

1895-1900. 
Maps of (i.) France under Ancien Regime; (2.) France, Lotharingia, and Burgundy 

in the eleventh and twelfth ceniuries ; (3.) France in the thirteenth century ; 

(4.) Europe in the eighteenth century prior to the French Revolution ; 

(5.) Gallia Sacra. In Poole's Historical Atlas of Modern Eitrope. 1896-8. 
Reviews contributed to the English Historical Review. 1897-1900. 

WILLIAM A. SHAW, Litt.D. 

Minutes of the Manchester Presbyterian Classis, Parts I., II., and III. Chetham Society's 

Publications, Manchester. 1890-1. 
Minutes of the Bury Presbyterian Classis, Parts I. and II. Chetham Society's Publications, 

Manchester. 1898. 

Calendar of Treasury Papers, 1729-30. Her Majesty's Stationery Office. 1898. 
The History of Currency, 1252-1894. Wilsons and Milne, [n.d.] 
Elizabethan Presbyterianism. English Historical Review, 3. 1888. 



WILLIAM A. SHAW, Litt.D. continued. 

The English Government and the Relief of Protestant Refugees. English Historical 

Review, 9. 1894. 
A History of the English Church during the Civil War and under the Commonwealth, 

1640-1660. 2 vols. Longmans and Co. 1900. 
Numerous other contributions to the English Historical Review and to the Dictionary of 

National Biography. 

JAMES TAIT, M.A. 

Biographies of Richard II., William of Wykeham, Sir John Oldcastle, Richard Whittington, 
Warwick "the Kingmaker," Margaret Tudor, Mary of Guise, and the most 
prominent members of the great medieval families of Mowbray, Neville, Fasten, 
Percy, Scrope, Talbot, Vere, and Woodville, and other contributions (118 in all) 
to the Dictionary of National Biography, 1890-1900. 

Catalogue of the Freeman Library, Owens College. Published by the Council of the 
College. 1894. 

Maps of (i.) England and Wales in the Norman Period ; (2.) England and Wales under 
the Lancastrian Dynasty ; (3.) Northern France in 1066; (4.) France during the 
Hundred Years' War. In Poolers Historical Atlas of Modern Europe. 1896-1900. 

Manchester under Lords of the Manor (Warburton Lectures). In the Press. 

Contributions to the English Historical Review on the origin of the English boroughs and 
other problems of medieval history. 

MARY TOUT, M.A. (Mrs. T. F. TOUT). 

Biographies of Richard Wych, Bishop of Chichester and Saint (d. 1253); St. Ursula; 
John Wakering, Bishop of Norwich (d. 1425) ; Robert Walerand, Judge (d. 1273); 
William Wallingford, Abbot of St. Alban's (d. 1488) ; John deWaltham, Bishop of 
Salisbury (d. 1395) ; Roger de Weseham, Bishop of Lichfield (d. 1257) ; William de 
Windsor, Deputy of Ireland (d. 1384); William de S. Mere 1'Eglise, Bishop of 
London (d. 1224); Willibrord, St., Archbishop of Utrecht (d. 738). Dictionary 
of National Biography. 1896-1 900. 

Professor T. F. TOUT, M.A. 

History of England for the Use of Schools. [Part I., to 1509, by Professor York 
Powell.] Part II., 1509-1689 (1898), and Part III., 1689-1887 (ist edition, 
1890, 2nd edition, 1898), by Professor Tout. Longmans and Co. 

Short Analysis of English History. Macmillan and Co., History Primers, 1891, reprinted 
1895. 

Edward the First. Macmillan and Co., Twelve English Statesmen Series. 1893. 

The Empire and the Papacy, 918-1273. Period II. of Rivingtons' Periods of European 
History. 1898. 

Biographies of Edward II., Henry IV. and Henry VI., Isabella, Queen of Edward II., 
Isabella, Queen of Richard II., Margaret of Anjou, various members of the 
families of Mortimer (Earls of March), Segrave, Vescy, Umfraville (Earls of Angus), 
and Warenne (Earls of Surrey), Catharine of Braganza, and other contributions 
(240 in all) to the Dictionary of National Biography. 1885-1900. 



( 164 ) 

Professor T. F. TOUT, M.A. continued. 

The Earldoms under Edward I. in Trans. Royal Historical Society [N.S.] 8. 1894. 
Map of England under Edward I. In Poole's Historical Atlas of Modern Europe. 

1897. 

Numerous reviews and contributions to the English Historical Revieiv, the Athenceum, etc. 
Trials of the Judges displaced by Edward I. in 1289. To be edited for the Camden Series 

of the Royal Historical Society, from the Assize Rolls in the Public Record Office. 

(In progress.) 

Professor ADOLPHUS WILLIAM WARD, Litt.D., LL.D. 

The House of Austria in the Thirty Years' War. Macmillan and Co., London. 1869. 
The Counter-Reformation (Epochs of Church History series). Longmans and Co. 1889. 
Sir Henry Wotton. A. Constable and Co. 1897. 
Biographies of Anne (Queen), Charles II., George I., James II., Mary II., and other 

contributions (58 in all) to the Dictionary of National Biography. 1884 1900. 
The Electress Sophia and the Hanoverian Succession. English Historical Review, 

1. 1886. 

And numerous other contributions to the English Historical Review. 
(See also ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE, p. i6i.) 



IV. PHILOSOPHY AND ECONOMICS. 

Professor R. ADAMSQN, M.A., LL.D. 

The Philosophy of Kant. Shaw Fellowship Lectures. Douglas. 1879. 

Fichte. Blackwootfs Philosophical Classics. 1884. 

Articles on Belief, Logic, Fichte, Kant, and Schelling. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 

gth edition. 

On Schopenhauer's Philosophy. Mind [o.s.], 1. 1876. 
On Jevons on Mill's Experimental Methods. Mind [o.s.], 3. 1878. 
Some considerations on the Theory of Money. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1884-5. 
On H. Sidgwick on the Critical Philosophy. Mind [o.s.], 8. 1883. 
Kant's view of Mathematical Premisses and Reasoning. Mind [o.s.], 8. 1883. 
Riehl on "Philosophical Criticism." Mind [o.s.], 14. 1889. 
And many reviews in Mind. 

R. G. BURY, M.A. 

The Later Platonism. Journ. of Philology, 23. 1895. 

SYDNEY J. CHAPMAN, M.A. 

Local Government and State Aid (Warburton Prize). W. Swan Sonnenschein. 1899. 
The Trades Union Congress and Federation. Economic Journ. 1899. 
The Regulation of Wages by Lists in the Spinning Industries. Brit. Assoc. Report. 
1899. 



Professor A. W. FLUX, M.A. 

Jevons and his Work. Economic Journ. 1894. 

The Commercial Supremacy of Great Britian (2 parts). Economic Journ. 1894. 
Remarks on Fifty years' Accounts of the Bank of England. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1894. 
Fifty years' Accounts of the Bank of England. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1894-5. 
A Comparison of the Age-distribution of Town and Country Populations in Different 

Lands. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1897. 

British Trade and German Competition. Economic Journ. 1897. 
The New Canadian Tariff. Economic Journ. 1897. 
The Lock-out in the Iron Trade in Denmark. Economic Journ. 1897. 
Shipping Charges and the Fall in Prices. National Review. 1897. 
The Cost of Compensation for Mining Accidents in Germany. Journ. Statist. Soc. 1897. 
On the Cost of Sea Transport in Proportion to Values. Manchester Memoirs, 41. 1897. 
On the Fall in Prices during the last Twenty Years. Manchester Memoirs, 41. 1897. 
Compensation Acts in Europe. Economic Journ. 1898. 

Compensation for Industrial Accidents. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1897-8. 
Our Foreign Trade Rivals. Economic Review. 1898. 

Some Old Trade Records re-examined. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1898-9. 
Notes on City Government and Local Taxation in Copenhagen. Trans. Manch. Statist. 

Soc. 1899 1900. 
Old Age Pensions in Denmark ; their influence on Thrift and Pauperism. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1899. 

Saving and Spending (2 papers). Economic Review. 1899. 
Denmark and its Aged Poor. Yale Review (also reprinted). 1899. 
The Commercial Supremacy of Great Britain. Economic Journ. 1899. 
The Danish Lock-out. Economic Journ. 1899. 
The Flag and Trade. Journ. Statist. Soc. 1899. 
Contributions to the Dictionary of Political Economy, edited by R. H. Inglis Pa/grave. 

Macmillan and Co. 1891-9. 

VICTORINE JEANS, M.A. 

Factory Act Legislation. Cobden Club Prize Essay, Victoria University. 1891. 

Professor W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.(') 

Pure Logic and the Relation of Logic and Mathematics. E. Stanford. 1863. 
The Coal Question. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1865 ; 2nd edition, 1866. 
On Coal: a Lecture. John Heywood. 1866. 
On Trade-Societies, their Objects and Policy: a Lecture. Privately printed, Manchester, 

1868. 
The Substitution of Similars. Macmillan and Co. 1869. 

(*) This List has been compiled from the Letters and Journal of W. STANLEY JEVONS, edited by his 
Wife, from the Royal Society's Catalogue of Scientific Papers, and other sources. Certain omissions are 
intentional (see p. 155). 

AA 



( '66 ) 

Professor W. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

Elementary Lessons in Logic. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1870. I5th impression, 

1889. 
On Industrial Partnerships : a Lecture. National Association for ttie Promotion of Social 

Sciences. 1870. 

The Match Tax: a Problem in Finance. E. Stanford. 1871. 
The Theory of Political Economy. Macmillan and Co. 1871. 

The Principles of Science. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1871; jrd edition, 1888. 
Mill's Logic and the Principles of Science. Hull Criterion. 1874. 
Money and the Mechanism of Exchange. H. S. King and Co., International Scientific 

Series. 1875. 

Logic: Science Primer. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1876. nth impression, 1900. 
On the Variation of Prices and the Value of the Currency since 1782. Journ. Statist. 

Soc. 1865. 

A Logical Abacus. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Prof., 5. 1866. 
Mr. Gladstone's Financial Policy. Macmillan 's Mag. 1866. 
On the frequent Autumnal Pressure in the Money Market, and the Action of the Bank 

of England. Journ. Statist. Soc. 1866. 
Brief Account of a Mathematical Theory of Political Economy. Journ. Statist. Soc. 

1866. 
On the Probable Duration of the South Staffordshire Coal Field. Geol. Mag., 4. 

1867. 
On the Analogy between the Post Office Telegraphs and other Systems of Conveyance 

of the United Kingdom as regards Government Control. Trans. Manch. 

Statist. Soc. 1866-7. 

Evidence before the Royal Commission on International Coinage. 1868. 
On the International Monetary Convention. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1867-8. 
On the Condition of the Metallic Currency of the United Kingdom.. Journ. Statist. 

Soc. 1868. 

On the Probable Exhaustion of our Coal Mines. Roy. Institut. Proc., 5. 1869. 
Report to the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the Pressure of Taxation. 1 869. 
On the Value of Gold. Journ. Statist. Soc. 1869. 
On the Condition of the Metallic Currency of the United Kingdom. Times. Aug. 27 

and Sept. 7, 1869. 

A Deduction from Darwin's Theory. Nature, 1. 1869. 
Inaugural Address to the Manchester Statistical Society on the Work of the Society 

in connection with the Questions of the Day. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 

1869-70. 

On the Mechanical Performance of Logical Inference. Phil. Trans. 1870. 
On the Principle of the Conservation of Customs. Owens College Magazine. 1870. 
On a General System of Numerically Definite Reasoning. Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 

1870. 

On the Laws of Muscular Exertion (2 papers). Nature, 2. 1870. 
Address to the Economics and Statistics Section of the British Association at Liverpool. 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1870. 



( 167 ) 

Professor VV. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

Memorial to the Home Secretary as to Uniformity in the Census of 1871. Brit. 

Assoc. Report. 1870. 
On the so-called Molecular Movements of Microscopic Particles. Manch. Lit. and 

Phil. Soc. Proc., 9. 1870. 

The Power of Numerical Discrimination. Nature, 3. 1871. 
Evidence before the Royal Commission to inquire into matters relating to Coal in the 

United Kingdom. 1871. 
Encke's Comet, and the supposed Resisting Medium. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 11. 1872. 
On the Inverse or Inductive Logical Problem. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 11. 

1872. 

I,akes with Two Outfalls. Nature, 8. 1873. 

Who discovered the Quantification of the Predicate? Contemporary Review. 1873. 
The Railways and the State. In Essays and Addresses by Professors and Lecturers of 

the Owens College. Maanillan and Co. 1874. 
The Progress of the Mathematical Theory of Political Economy. Trans. Manch. 

Statist. Soc. 1874-5. 

The Solar Period and the Price of Corn. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1875. 
The Progress of the Coal Question. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1875. 
Comte's Philosophy. Nature, 12. 1875. 

The Post Office Telegraphs and the Financial Results. Fortnightly Review. 1875. 
On the United Kingdom Alliance and its Prospects of Success. Trans. Manch. Statist. 

Soc. 1875-6. 
The Future of the Skating Rink ; a serious Speculation by a Philosophic Correspondent. 

Manchester Guardian. Apr. 14, 1876. 

Cruelty to Animals; a Study in Sociology. Fortnightly Review. 1876. 
Article on Boole. Encyclopedia Britannica., gth Edition, 1876. 
The Future of Political Economy. Fortnightly Review. 1876. 

J. S. MACKENZIE, M.A. 

An Introduction to Social Philosophy. MacLehose, Glasgmu. 1890. 

A Manual of Ethics. W. B. dive. London. 1893. 

The Relation between Ethics and Economics. Internat. Journ. of Ethics, 3. 1893. 

Professor J. E. CRAWFORD MUNRO, LL.M., LL.D.( a ). 

Sliding Scales in the Iron Industry. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1885-6. 
Sliding Scales in the Cotton Industry. Brit. Assoc. Reports. 1887. 
Sliding Scales in the Coal and Iron Industry. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1889-90. 
The Probable Effects on Wages of a General Reduction in the Hours of Labour. 
Economic Journ. 1891. 

J. H. POYNTING, Sc.D., F.R.S. (see MATHEMATICS, etc., p. 174). 

(') List kindly furnished by Professor FLUX. 



ALFRED SIDGWICK, B.A. 

Fallacies. Kegan Paul and Co., International Scientific Series. 1883. 

The Localisation of Fallacy. Mind,'). 1882. 

Propositions with a view to Proof. Mind, 8. 1883. 

Davidson's Logic of Definition (critical notice). Mind, 10. 1885. 

ALFRED EDWARD TAYLOR, M.A. 

On the Interpretation of Plato's Parmenides. Parts II. and III. Mind [N. s.], 5, 1896, 

and 6, 1897. 

The Metaphysical Problem and its bearing on Ethics. Internal. Journ. of Ethics. 1 900. 
The Problem of Conduct. An essay upon the Relation between Metaphysics and Ethics. 

Awarded the "Green" Moral Philosophy Prize in the University of Oxford, 

1899. In the press. 
And many reviews in Mind, The Internal. Journ. of Ethics, and Nature. 



V. GEOGRAPHY. 

A. J. HERBERTSON, Ph.D., F.R.S.E. 

Report on Physical Observations carried on by the Fishery Board for Scotland, 1893. 
Thirteenth Annual Report of Fishery Board for Scotland. 1895. 

H. YULE OLDHAM, M.A. 

The discovery of the Cape Verde Islands. In " von Richthofen Festschrift," Dietrich 

Reimer, Berlin. 1893. 
The Manchester Ship Canal. The Geographical Journal, 3. 1894. 



VI. EDUCATION. 

CATHERINE I. DODD. 

Tiny Housewives. School Reading Books, Blackie and Co. 1894. 

Home Stories, Part I. and Part II. School Reading Books, Blackie and Co. 1895. 

Domestic Economy for Students. Joseph Hughes. 1896. 

A School Journey in Germany. Special Reports on Educational Subjects, edited by 

M. E. Sadler, 1. Her Majesty's Stationery Office. 1897. 
School Journeys. National Review. Nov., 1897. 

Introduction to Herbartian Principles of Teaching. Swan Sonnenschein and Son. 1898. 
Study of School Children. National Review. Sept., 1898. 
Town and Country Children. National Review. Dec., 1898. 
A Study in Twins. National Review. June, 1899. 
Hungarian Education. Special Reports on Educational Subjects, edited by M. E. Sadler. 

4. Her Majesty's Stationery Office. 1899. 



( 1 69 ) 

Principal J. G. GREENWOOD, B.A., LL.D. 

School and College Studies: an Introductory Address. Longmans and Co. 1858. 

On Certain Theories of Education : an Introductory Address. T. Sow ler and Sons. 1864. 

On some Relations of Culture to Practical Life. Essays and Addresses by Professors and 

Lecturers of the Owens College. Macmillan and Co. 1874. 
(See also CLASSICS, p. 158.) 

H. THISELTON MARK, B.A., B.Sc. 

An Outline of the History of Educational Theories in England. Swan SonnenscJiein and 

Co. 1899. 

The Education of the Anglo Saxon (3 articles). Educational Review, [N.S.], 1. 1899. 
Central Initiative and Local Government. New Century Review. March, 1899. 
Articles on Education and Child-Study, The Teaching of Morality, Pioneers of English 

Education, and other articles in the National Home Reading Mag., Special 

Course, 11. 1899. 

EDITH C. WILSON. 

A Survey of the Present State of the Education of Women. Journal of Education. Sept., 
1888. 

VII. BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

Professor W. A. COPINGER, LL.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.A. 

Treatise on Predestination, Election, and Grace. James Nisbet. 1889. 

On Fifteenth Century Latin Bibles. The Library, 3. 1891. 

On the Necessity for the Formation of a Bibliographical Society. The Library, 4. 1892. 

Corrections and Additions to the Magazine Catalogue of Incunabula. Manchester. 

Privately printed. 1892. 

Inaugural Address before the Bibliographical Society. Trans, of Bibl. Soc., 1. 1892. 
Incunabula Biblica. Bernard Quaritch. 1892. 
On Blades' Bibliographical Miscellanies. The Library, 4. 1892. 

Presidential Address before the Bibliographical Society. Trans, of Bibl. Soc., 2. 1893. 
Investigation of British Museum Catalogue of Latin Bibles. Manchester. Privately 

printed. 1893. 

Catalogue of the Copinger Collection of Latin Bibles. Bernard Quaritch. 1 893. 
Bibliographiana. Leyland's New Year's Gift. H. Sotheran and Co. 1895. 
Bibliographiana. On the Authorship of Articles in Edinburgh Review. H. Sotheran 

and Co. 1895. 

Supplement to Main's Repertorium Bibliographicum (3 vols.). H Sotheran and Co. 1895. 
Incunabula Virgiliana. Trans, of Bibl. Soc., 2. 1895. 
The Bible and its Transmission. H. Sotheran and Co. 1897. 
On Certain MSS. and Fifteenth Century Editions of the work De Imitatione Christi. 

The Library, 9. 1897. 
Hand List of a Collection of Incunabula illustrating Progress of Printing. Manchester. 

Privately printed. 1898. 



Professor W. A. COPINGER, LL.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.A. continued. 

Bibliographiana. On English Translations of the Imitatio Christi. H. Sotheran and Co. 

1900. 
Imitatio Christi : a new and absolutely literal Translation. Hobbs and Co., Glasgow. 

1900. 
And other works. 

J. TAYLOR KAY. 

The Classification of Literature. Nineteenth Century. 1884. 
How to Catalogue Books. Nineteenth Century. 1893. 
And other papers. 



VIII.-HARMONY AND MUSICAL COMPOSITION. 

Sir JOHN FREDERICK BRIDGE, Mus.D. 

Mount Moriah (Oratorio). Novella and Co. 1874 

HENRY HILES, Mus.D., F.R.C.O. 

The Harmony of Sounds. Taylor, Garnett, and Co. 1871. 

The Grammar of Music. Forsyth Bros. 1879. 

Part-writing. Novella and Co. 1884. 

Harmony : Chordal and Contrapuntal. John Heywood. 1 894. 

Prize Organ Works (R.C.O.). Novella and Co. 

Prize Anthems. Novella and Co. 

The Patriarchs (Oratorio). Novella and Co. 

The Crusaders (Cantata) Novella and Co. 

War in the Household (Opera). Novella and Co. 

Many Anthems, Church Services, Part-songs, Glees, etc. Novella and Ct. 

Many articles on Music in various journals. 



IX. MATHEMATICS, .PHYSICS, AND ENGINEERING^' ) 

J. REGINALD ASHWORTH, M.Sc. 

Seasonal Variation of tne Temperature of Exposed Water Surfaces. Trans. Rochdale Lit. 

and Sri. Sac., 3, 1892 ; and Brit. Assoc. Report, 1892. 
The Rainfall in Rochdale and the Neighbourhood. Trans. Rochdale Lit. and Sri. Sof., 4. 

1894. 
Methods of Determining the Efficiencies of Dynamos and Motors. College Prize Essay. 

Electrical Plant. 1894-5. 



(*) A volume of Studies from the Physical and Chemical Laboratories of the Owens College was published 
in 1893 by the Council of the College. 



J. REGINALD ASHWORTH, M.Sc. continued. 

Methods of making Magnets independent of Changes of Temperature. Proc. Roy. Soc., 

62. 1897. 
The Construction of Magnets of Constant Intensity. Terrestrial Magnetic Conference 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1898. 

JOHN B. B. BURKE, B.A. 

Experiments on Rontgen Rays. Electrician, 37. 1896. 

On the Change of Absorption produced by Fluorescence. Phil. Trans. 1898. 

Experiments on the Luminosity produced by striking Sugar. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1898. 

J. D. CHORLTON, M.Sc. 

Report of the Examination of some of the Scientific Instruments Employed by the late 

Dr. JOULE. Proc. Roy. Soc., 59. 1896. 
(See also CHARLES H. LEES.) 

Professor R. B. CLIFTON, M.A., F.R.S., F.R.A.S. 

An attempt to refer some Phenomena attending the Emission of Light to Mechanical 

Principles. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc. 5. 1866. 
Note on Prof. DE MORGAN'S paper entitled " On the Early History of the signs + and 

-." Camb. Phil. Soc. Trans., 11. 1866. 
(See also H. E. ROSCOE, under CHEMISTRY, p. 199.) 

STANLEY DUNKERLEY, M.Sc. 

On the Vibration and Whirling of Shafts. Phil. Trans. 1894. Liverpool Engineering 
Soc. Proc. 16. 1894. 

* JULIUS FRITH, A.M.I.E.E. 

An Analysis of the Electromotive Force and Current Curves of a Wilde Alternator under 

Various Conditions. Manchester Memoirs [4], 8. 1894. 
On the True Resistance and on the Back Electromotive Force of the Electric Arc. 

Manchester Memoirs [4], 9. 1895. 
The Effect of Wave Form on the Alternate Current Arc. Phil. Mag. [5], 41. 1896. 

JULIUS FRITH and CHARLES RODGERS, B.Sc. 

On the Resistance of the Electric Arc. Phil. Mag. [5], 42. 1896. 

WILLIAM GANNON, M.A. 

On Copper Electrolysis in Vacuo. Proc. Roy. Soc., 55. 1894. 
(See also ARTHUR SCHUSTER.) 

W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc. 

A Bibliography of Viscosity. Manchester Memoirs [4], 3. 1890. 
On a Comparison Magnetometer. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1887. 

(See also BALFOUR STEWART, and THOMAS EWAN, under CHEMISTRY, p. 190, and below.) 



( 172 ) 

W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.o., and ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 
On New Forms of Stereometers. Manchester Memoirs [4], 4. 1890. 

\V W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc., and H. HOLDEN, M.Sc. 

Experiments on Electrolysis. Part I. : Change of Density of the Electrolyte at the 
Electrodes. Part. 'II. : Irreciprocal Conduction. Phil. Mag., [5], 25 and 26. 
1888. 

W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc., in conjunction with Professor W. STROUD, D.Sc., M.A. 
On a Null Method in Electro-calorimetry. Brit. Assoc. Reports. 1887 and 1888. 

W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc., in conjunction with HUBERT L. TERRY. 

On the Specific Heat of Non-Conductors. Manchester Memoirs [4], 4. 1890. 

ALBERT GRIFFITHS, D.Sc., A.R.C.S. 

Some Experiments with Alternating Currents. Phil. Mag. [5], 39. 1895. 
Diffusive Connection. Phil. Mag. [5], 46. 1898. 

JOHN H. GRINDLEY, B.Sc. 

An Experimental Investigation of the Thermodynamical Properties of Saturated Steam. 
Proc. Roy. Soc., 66. 1900. Phil. Trans. 1900. 

R. F. GWYTHER, M.A. 

On a Form representing the Velocity at any point of an Incompressible Fluid under 

Conservative Forces. Manchester Memoirs [3], 7. 1882. 

Notes on some Quaternion Transformations. Manchester Memoirs [3], 7. 1882. 
On an Adaptation of the Lagrangian form of the Equations of Fluid-Motion. Manchester 

Memoirs [3], 7. 1882. 
A Proof of the Addition Theorem in Elliptic Integrals. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

22. 1883. 
On the Solution of the Equations of Vibrations of Ether in a Light Wave. Camb. 

Phil. Soc. Proc., 5. 1885. 
On the Differential Co-variants of Plane Curves and the Operators employed in their 

Development. Phil. Trans. 1893. 
The Differential Co-variants of Twisted Curves, with some Illustrations of the application 

to Quartic Curves. Proc. Roy. Soc., 56. 1894. 
The Limitations enforced upon the Mathematical Expression for Physical Quantities in 

consequence of Permanency of Form. Manchester Memoirs [4], 9. 1895. 
The Form of the Velocity-Potential across a Channel with Straight Sides. Manchester 

Memoirs, 42. 1898. 
And other papers. 

J. A. HARKER, D.Sc. (see CHEMISTRY, p. 193). 
G. HEMSALECH (see ARTHUR SCHUSTER). 

MORISABRO HlRAOKA (see BALFOUR STEWART). 



( 173 ) 

ALEXANDER HODGKINSON, M.B., C.M., B.Sc. (see MEDICINE, p. 232). 

H. HOLDEN, M.Sc. 

Measurements of the Magnetic Induction and Permeability in Soft Iron. Manch. Lit. 

and Phil. Sot. Proc., 26. 1886. 
A Method of Calculating the Electrostatic Capacity of a Conductor. Manchester Memoirs. 

[4], 1. 1888. 
(See also W. W. HALDANE GEE.) 

Professor HORACE LAMB, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. 

Hydrodynamics. Cambridge University Press. 1895. 

Infinitesimal Calculus. Cambridge University Press. 1897. 

On Ellipsoidal Current-sheets. Phil. Trans. 1887. 

On the Principal Electric Time-constant of a Circular Disk. Proc. Roy. Soc., 42. 1887. 

On the Flexure of an Elastic Plate. Proc. Loud. Math. Soc., 21. 1890. 

On the Deformation of an Elastic Shell. Proc. Land. Math. Soc., 21. 1890. 

On the Flexure of a Flat Elastic Spring. Manchester Memoirs [3], 10. 1890. 

On Reciprocal Theorems in Dynamics. Mem. Land. Math. Soc., 19. 1888. 

On the Flexure and the Vibrations of a Curved Bar. Mem. Land. Math. Soc., 19. 1888. 

On Continuity. Manchester Memoirs, 41. 1897. 

On Waves in a Medium having a Periodic Discontinuity of Structure. Manchester 

Memoirs, 42. 1897. 
On the Velocity of Sound in a Tube, as affected by the Elasticity of the Walls. 

Manchester Memoirs, 42. 1898. 
On the Reflection and Transmission of Electric Waves by a Metallic Grating. Proc. 

Land. Math. Soc., 29. 1898. 

On the Theory of Electric Endosmose, etc. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1887. 
A New Version of Argand's Proof that every Equation has a Root. Manchester Memoirs, 

43. 1899. 

ALEXANDER LARMOR, M.A. 

On the Geometrical Theory of Perspective. Quart. Journ. of Pure and Applied Math., 

84. 1886. 
Transformations in the Geometry of Circles. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1887. 

CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc. 

On the Law of Cooling, and its bearing on certain Equations in the Analytical Theory 

of Heat. Phil. Mag. [5], 28. 1889. 
On the Determination of the Thermal Conductivities of Bad Conductors. Manc/ieshr 

Memoirs [4], 4. 1890. 
On the Thermal Conductivities of Crystals and other Bad Conductors. Phil. Trans. 

1892. 
On a simple Geometrical Construction for the Intensity of Illumination at any point 

of a Plane, due to a small source of light symmetrical about an axis perpendicular 

to that plane. Phil. Mag. [5], 40. 1895. 

BB 



( 174 ) 

CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc. continued. 

On a Method of Determining the Thermal Conductivities of Salts, with some results 

of its application. Manchester Memoirs [4], 42. 1897. 
On the Thermal Conductivities of Single and Mixed Solids and Liquids, and their 

Variation with Temperature. Phil. Trans. 1898. 
On some Preliminary Experiments on the Effect of Pressure on Thermal Conductivity. 

Manchester Memoirs [4], 43. 1899. 
On the Resistance between Opposite Sides of a Quadrilateral one Diagonal of which 

bisects the other at Right Angles. Manchester Memoirs [4], 44. 1899. 
On the Conductivities of certain Heterogeneous Media for a steady flux having a 

potential. Phil. Mag. [5], 49. 1900. 
On the Thermal Conductivities of Mixtures and of their Constituents. Phil. Mag. [5], 

49. 1900. 
(See also ARTHUR SCHUSTER, P. J. HARTOG, under CHEMISTRY, p. 193, and below.) 

CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc., and J. D. CHORLTON, M.Sc. 

On a Simple Apparatus for determining the Thermal Conductivities of Cements and 
other Substances used in the Arts. Phil. Mag. [5], 41. 1896. 

CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc., and ROBERT W. SIEWART, B.Sc. 

On Electrolytic Polarisation. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 26. 1887. 

J. B. MILLAR, M.E. 

Descriptive Geometry. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1878; 2nd edition, 1887; 

3rd edition, 1899. 
A Method of finding the Axes of an Ellipse when two Conjugate Diameters are given. 

Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 14. 1875. 
On Oblique Arches. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 1877. 
Cast Iron Arches. The Engineer, 45. 1878. 

S. R. MILNER, D.Sc. 

The Thermal Conductivity of Water. Phil. Mag. [5], 48. 1899. 
The Theory of Solution Pressure. Phil. Mag. [5], 49. 1900. 

WILLIAM HENRY MOORBY, M.Sc. 

The Mechanical Equivalent of Heat. Part II. An Experimental Determination ... on 

Professor Osborne Reynolds's Method. Phil. Trans. 1897. 
(See also OSBORNE REYNOLDS.) 

J. H. POYNTING, Sc.D., F.R.S. 

On the Law of Force when a thin Homogeneous Shell exerts no attraction on a Particle 
within it. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 16. 1877. 

The Drunkenness Statistics of the large Towns in England and Wales. Manch. Lit. and 
Phil. Soc. Proc., 16. 1877. 

On a Method of using the Balance with great delicacy, and on its employment to deter- 
mine the Mean Density of the Earth. Proc. Roy. Soc., 28. 1879. 



( 175 ) 

J. H. POYNTING, Sc.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Estimation of Small Excesses of Weight by the Balance from the time of Vibra- 
tion and the Angular Deflection of the Beam. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Pro/:., 
18. 1879. 

Arrangement of a Tangent Galvanometer for Lecture-room purposes to illustrate the Laws 
of the action of Currents on Magnets and of the Resistance of Wires. Manch. Lit. 
and Phil. Soc. Prof., 18. 1879. 

Professor OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. 

On an Oblique Propeller. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1870. 

On the Suspension of a Ball by a Jet of Water. Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 1870. 

The Tails of Comets, the Solar Corona, and the Aurora, considered as Electrical 

Phenomena. Parts I. and II. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1870. 
On Cometary Phenomena. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1871. 
On an Electrical Corona resembling the Solar Corona. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 

1871-2. 
On the Electro-Dynamic Effect which Statical Electricity causes in a Moving Body : 

Induction of the Sun a Probable Cause of Terrestrial Magnetism. Manchester 

Memoirs [3], 5. 1872. 
On the Electrical Properties of Clouds and the Phenomena of Thunderstorms. Manch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 12. 1872. 
On the Relative Work spent in Friction and giving Rotation to Shot in Guns Rifled with 

an Increasing and a Uniform Twist. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 13. 1873. 
On the Bursting of Trees and Objects struck with Lightning. Manch. Lit. and Phil. 

Soc. Proc., 13. 1873. 
On the Effect of Acid on the Interior of Iron Wire. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

13. 1874. 

On the Destruction of Sound by Fog. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 13. 1873. 
On the Causes of the Racing of the Engines of Screw Steamships. Trans. Inst. of Naval 

Architects. 1873. 
On the Rate of Condensation of Steam mixed with Air on a Cold Surface. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 21. 1873. 

On the action of a Blast of Sand in cutting Hard Material. Phil. Mag. [4], 46. 1873. 
On the Forces caused by Evaporation from, and Condensation at, a Surface. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 22. 1874. 
On the Surface Forces caused by the Communication of Heat. Phil. Mag. [4], 48. 

1874. 

On the Effect of Immersion on Screw Propellers. Trans. Inst. of Naval Architects. 1874. 
On the Extent and Action of the Heating Surface of Steam Boilers. Manch. Lit. and 

Phil. Soc. Proc., 14. 1874. 
On the Effect of Rain to Calm the Sea by the Production of Vortex Rings. Manch. Lit. 

and Phil. Soc. Proc., 14. 1875. 
On the Refraction of Sound by the Atmosphere. Two Parts. Proc. Roy. Soc., 22. 

1874. 
On the Slipping of Belts on Pulleys caused by Elasticity. The Engineer. 1874. 



( 176 ) 

Professor OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On Rolling Friction. Prof. Roy. Sof., 23. 1875. Phil. Trans. 1876. 

On the Principle of the Electro-Magnet constructed by Mr. John Faulkner. Manch. Lit. 

and Phil. Soc. Prof., 15. 1875. 
On Graphic Methods of Solving Practical Problems. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Prof. 

1875- 
Improvements in Turbines and Centrifugal Pumps. Specification of Patent No. 724. 

1875- 

On the Steering of Screw Steamers. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1875. 

On the Unequal Onward Motion in the Upper and Lower Currents in the Wake of a Ship, 
and the Effects of this ... on the Action of the Screw-Propeller. Trans. Inst. 
Naval Architects, 17. 1876. 

On the Refraction of Sound by the Atmosphere. Roy. Soc. Proc., 24. 1876. Phil. 
Trans. 1877. 

On the Forces caused by the Communication of Heat between a Surface and a Gas, and 
on a New Photometer. Proc. Roy. Soc., 24. 1876. Phil. Trans. 1877. 

On the Resistance encountered by Vortex Rings, and the Relation between the Vortex 
Rings and the Stream Lines of a Disc. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1876. 

On Various Forms of Vortex Motion. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 16. 1877. Roy. 
I/is ti /tit. Proc., 8. 1877. 

On the Investigation of the Steering Qualities of Ships. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1876. 

On the Rate of Progression of Groups of Waves, and the Rate at which Energy is 
transmitted by Waves. Read before Section A, Brit. Assoc. Nature, 16. 1877. 

On the Effect of Propellers on the Steering of Vessels. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1877. 

On the Manner in which Raindrops and Hailstones are formed. Manchester Memoirs 
[3], 6. 1876. 

The Formation of Hailstones, Raindrops, and Snowflakes. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 
1877. 

On the Internal Cohesion of Liquids and the Suspension of a Column of Mercury of a 
Height more than Double that of the Barometer. Manchester Memoirs [3], 7. 
1878. 

On the Steering of Screw Steamers. Brit. Assoc. Report, 1878, in Report of Com- 
mittee. 

On certain Dimensional Properties of Matter in the Gaseous State. Part I. : Experi- 
mental Researches on Thermal Transpiration of Gases through Porous Plates, and 
on the Laws of Transpiration and Impulsion, including an experimental proof that 
Gas is not a Continuous Plenum. Part II. : On an Extension of the Dynamical 
Theory of Gas, which includes the Stresses, Tangential and Normal, caused by a 
Varying Condition of the Gas, and affords an explanation of the Phenomena of 
Transpiration and Impulsion. Phil. Trans. 1880. 

On the Bursting of the Gun on board the Thunderer. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 
18. 1879. 

Note on Thermal Transpiration. Proc. Roy. Soc., 30. 1880. 

Some Further Experiments on the Cohesion of Water and Mercury, a column of Mercury 
90 inches high suspended in Vacuo, and Mercury and Water supporting a Tension 



( 177 ) 

Professor OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

of 1 2 Atmospheres caused by Centrifugal Force. Manch. Lit, and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

20. 1 880-8 1. 

On the Steering of Ships. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1880. 
On the Effect of Oil in destroying Waves on the Surface of Water. Brit. Assoc. Report. 

1880. 

On Surface Tension and Capillary Action. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1881. 
On the Floating of Drops on the Surface of Water depending only on the Purity of the 

Surface. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 21. 1881. 
Fundamental Limits to Speed. The Engineer. 1881 and 1882. 
On an Elementary Solution of the Dynamical Problem of Isochronous Vibration. Manch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 22. 1882. 
The Comparative Resistances and Stresses in the cases of Oscillation and Rotation with 

reference to the Steam Engine and Dynamo. The Engineeer. 1883. 
An Experimental Investigation of the Circumstances which determine whether the 

Motion of Water in Parallel Channels shall be Direct or Sinuous, and of the Law 

of Resistance in Parallel Channels. Proc. Roy. Soc., 35. 1883. Phil. Trans. 

1884. 
On the Transmission of Energy. Society of Arts Journ., 1883, and separately as Cantor 

Lectures. 
On the Equations of Motion and the Boundary Conditions for Viscous Fluids. Brit. 

Assoc. Report. 1883. 
The General Theory of Thermodynamics [1883]. Published in Heat and its Mechanical 

Applications, a Series of Lectures delivered at the Inst. of Civil Engineers. 1885. 
On the Two Manners of Motion of Water. Roy. Institut. Proc., 11. 1884. 
On Kinetic Engines as illustrating the Laws of Thermodynamics. Brit. Assoc. Report. 

1884. 

On the Hydrodynamical Theory of Lubrication. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1884. 
On the Theory of the (Steam Engine) Indicator and the Errors in Indicator Diagrams. 

Proc. Inst. Civil Engineers, 83. 1885. 
On the Dilatancy of Media composed of Rigid Particles in contact, with Experimental 

Illustrations. Phil. Mag. [5], 20. 1885. 
Experiments showing Dilatancy, a property of Granular Material possibly connected with 

Gravitation. Roy. Institut. Proc., 11. 1886. 
On the Theory of Lubrication and its Application to Mr. Beauchamp Tower's Experiments. 

Including a Determination of the Viscosity of Olive Oil. Phil. Trans. 1886. 
On the Flow of Gases. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 25. 1885. Phil. Mag. [5], 21. 

1886. 
On a Method of Investigating the Qualities of Lifeboats. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

26. 1887. 
On the Achievements in Mechanical Science, accomplished between 1866 and 1887. 

Presidential Address, Section G, British Association Meeting in Manchester. 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1887. 
On certain Laws relating to the Regime of Rivers and Estuaries, and on the possibility 

of Experiments on a small Scale. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1887. 



( '78 ) 

Professor OSBORNE REYNOLDS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Triple-Expansion Engines and Engine Trials at the Whitworth Engineering 

Laboratory, Owens College, Manchester. Prof, Inst. Civil Engineers, 99. 

1889-90. 

On Model Estuaries (3 papers). Brit. Assoc. Report. 1889, 1890, and 1891. 
On Two Harmonic Analyzers. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc. 1890-91. 
Memoir of James Prescott Joule. Published as Vol. 6, $th Series, Manchester Memoirs. 

1892. 

Study of Fluid Motion by means of Colour-Bands. Roy. Institut. Proc., 14. 1893. 
On the Dynamical Theory of Incompressible Viscous Fluids and the Determination of 

the Criterion. Phil. Trans. 1895. 
Experiments showing the Boiling of Water in an Open Tube at ordinary Temperature. 

Exhibited at British Association Meeting at Oxford. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1894. 
On the Behaviour of the Surface of Separation of Two Liquids of different Densities. 

Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc. 1895. 
On a Method of Determining the Dryness of Saturated Steam and the Condition of Steam 

Gas. MancJtester Memoirs, 41. 1896. 
On the Mechanical Equivalent of Heat. Part I. : On the Method, Appliances, and 

Limits of Error in the direct Determination of the Work Expended in Raising the 

Temperature of Ice-Cold Water to that of Water Boiling under a pressure of 

29*899 inches of Ice-Cold Mercury in Manchester. Bakerian Lecture. Phil. 

Trans., 1897. (See also W. H. MOORBY.) 
On the Slipperiness of Ice. Manchester Memoirs, 43. 1899. 

CHARLES RODGERS, B.Sc. (see JULIUS FRITH). 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S., F.R.A.S. 

On the Spectrum of Nitrogen. Proc. Roy. Soc., 20. 1872. 

On the Nature of the Force produced by the motion of a body exposed to Rays of Heat 

and Light. Phil. Trans. 1876. 
The Influence of Mathematics on the Progress of Physics. Introductory Address delivered 

at the Owens College, f. E. Cornish. 1881. 

On the Internal Constitution of the Sun. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1883. 
The Genesis of Spectra. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1882. 
On some Measurements of Glacier Motion. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1883. 
Experiments on the Discharge of Electricity through Gases. Bakerian Lecture. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 37. 1884. 
On the Connection between Sunspots and Terrestrial Phenomena. Brit. Assoc. Report. 

1884. 

Ueber die Entladung der Electricitat durch Case. Wied. Ann., 24. 1885. 
On the Diurnal Period of Terrestrial Magnetism. Phil. Mag. [5], 21. 1886. 
Experiments on the Discharge of Electricity through Gases. Proc. Roy. Soc., 42. 1887. 
Memoir of the late Professor Balfour Stewart. Manchester Memoirs [4], 1. 1888. 
University Teaching in relation to the Industrial Applications of Science. Introductory 

Address delivered at the Owens College. J. E. Cornish. 1889. 
The Diurnal Variation of Terrestrial Magnetism. Phil. Trans. 1889. 



( 179 ) 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, Ph.D., F.R.S., F.R.A.S. continued. 

The Disruptive Discharge of Electricity through Gases. Phil. Mag. [5], 29. 1890. 
Experiments with Lord Rayleigh's Colour Box. Proc. Roy. Soc., 48. 1890. 
The Discharge of Electricity through Gases. Bakerian Lecture. Proc. Roy. Soc., 47. 1890. 
The Elementary Treatment of Problems on the Diffraction of Light. Phil. Mag. [5], 31. 

1891. 
The Influence of Bending of Magnetic Needles on the apparent Magnetic Dip. Phil. Mag. 

[5], 31. 1891. 

Electrical Notes, I. Phil. Mag. [5], 32. 1891. 
Presidential Address, Section A, British Association Meeting at Edinburgh. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1892. 
On Primary and Secondary Batteries in which the Electrolyte is a Gas. Brit. Assoc. Report 

(Edinburgh). 1892. 
The present condition of Mathematical Analysis as applied to Terrestrial Magnetism. 

Report of Chicago Meteorological Congress. 1893. 
On Interference Phenomena. Phil. Mag. [5], 37. 1894. 
Electrical Notes, II. Phil. Mag. [5], 39. 1895. 

On the Construction of Delicate Galvanometers. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1894. 
On some remarkable passages in the Writings of Benjamin Franklin. Manchester Metnoirs 

[4], 9. 1895. 

Atmospheric Electricity. Roy. Institut. Proc. 1895. 

On the Scale Value of the late Dr. Joule's Thermometers. Phil. Mag. [5], 39. 1895. 
On Electrical Currents induced by Rotating Magnets and their Application to some 

Phenomena of Terrestrial Magnetism. Terrestrial Magnetism, 1. 1896. 
On a new Law connecting the periods of Molecular Vibration. Nature, 55. 1896. 
Electrical Notes, III. Phil Mag. [5], 43. 1897. 

On Lunar and Solar Periodicities of Earthquakes. Proc. Roy. Soc., 61. 1897. 
On the Chemical Constitution of the Stars. Proc. Roy. Soc., 67. 1897. 
On the Interpretation of Earth Current Observations. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1898. 
On a Simple Method of obtaining the Expression of the Magnetic Potential of the Earth 

in a series of Spherical Harmonics. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1898. 
Die magnetische Ablenkung der Kathodenstrahlen. Wied. Ann., 65. 1898. 
On the Investigation of Hidden Periodicities. Terrestrial Magnetism, 3. 1898. 
On the possible Effects of Solar Magnetisation on periodic variations of Terrestrial 

Magnetism. Phil. Mag. [5], 46. 1898. 
On the Periodogram of Magnetic Declination at Greenwich. The " Stokes " Volume of 

Cantb. Phil. Soc. Trans. 1900. 

Articles on Spectroscopy and Volta in the Encyclopcedia Britannica, 9th edition. 
(See also H. E. ROSCOE, under CHEMISTRY, p. 199, and below.) 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, in conjunction with Captain Sir W. DE VV. ABNEY, K.C.B., F.R.S. 
On the Total Solar Eclipse of May 17*, 1882. Phil. Trans. 1884. 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER and A. W. CROSSLEY, D.Sc., Ph.D. 

On the Electrolysis of Silver Nitrate in Vacuo. Proc. Roy. Soc., 50. 1892. 



Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER in conjunction with Major L. DARWIN R.E., and E. WALTER 

MAUNDER. 
On the Total Solar Eclipse of August 29th, 1886. Phil. Trans. 1889. 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER and WILLIAM GANNON, M.A. 

A Determination of the Specific Heat of Water in Terms of the International Electric 
Units. Phil. Trans. 1895. 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER and G. HEMSALECH. 

On the Constitution of the Electric Spark. Phil Trans. 1899. 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER and CHARLES H. LEES, D.Sc. 

Intermediate Course of Practical Physics. Mac.millan and Co. 

Exercises in Practical Physics. Cambridge University Press. In the Press. 

T. E. STANTON, D.Sc. 

On the Passage of Heat between Metal Surfaces and Liquids in Contact with them. 
Phil. Trans. 1897. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S.(') 

Physics : Science Primer. Macmillan and Co. 1872. 

The Conservation of Energy. Kegan Paul, Trench, and Co. ist edition, 1872 ; 

2nd edition, 1872. 

Lessons in Elementary Physics. Macmillan and Co. 1870. 
Terrestrial Magnetism. Article in the Encydopcedia Britannica, gth edition. 
On Auroral Appearances and . . . Terrestrial Magnetism. Astron. Soc. Month. Nat. 

1870. Phil. Mag. [4], 39. 1870. 
Results of the Monthly Observations of Dip and Horizontal Force made at the Kew 

Observatory, from April, 1863, to March, 1869, inclusive. Proc. Roy. Soc., 18. 

1870. 
On the Temperature-equilibrium of an Enclosure in which there is a Body in Visible 

Motion. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1871. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 10. 1871. 
Les Progres Regents de la Physique Cosmique. Revue des Ccntrs Scient., 1. 1871. 
Experiments on the Melting Point of Paraffin. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 12 

1873- 

On Ethereal Friction. Brit. Assoc.' Report. 1873. 
On an Instrument for Measuring the Direct Heat of the Sun. Manchester Memoirs [3], 

6. 1875. 
On the Variations of the Daily Range of Atmospheric Temperature as recorded at the 

Kew Observatory (3 papers). Proc. Roy. Soc., 25 and 26. 1876 and 1877. 
On the Diurnal Range of the Magnetic Declination as recorded at the Trevandrum 

Observatory. Proc. Roy. Soc., 27. 1878. 

(') List mainly borrowed from Professor Schuster's Memoir, Manchester Memoirs [4], 1. 1888. 



Professor BALFOUR STEWART, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Variations of the Diurnal Range of the Magnetic Declination as recorded at 

the Prague Observatory. Proc. Roy. Soc., 27. 1878. 
Preliminary Report to the Solar Physics Committee on the comparison for two years, 

between the Diurnal Ranges of Magnetic Declination as recorded at the Kew 

Observatory, and the Diurnal Ranges of Atmospheric Temperature as recorded 

at the Observatories of Stonyhurst, Kew, and Falmouth. Proc. Roy. Soc., 34. 

1882. 
On the Connection between the State of the Sun's Surface and the Horizontal Intensity 

of the Earth's Magnetism. Proc. Roy. Soc., 34. 1882. 

On the Long-period Inequality in Rain-fall. Manchester Memoirs [3], 7. 1880. 
On the Cause of the Solar Diurnal Variations of Terrestrial Magnetism. Phil. Mag. 

[5], 21. 1886. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART in conjunction with W. LANT CARPENTER. 

On the Inequalities of Diurnal Range of the Declination Magnet. Proc. Roy. Soc., 28. 

1879. 
Report to the Solar Physics Committee on a Comparison between Apparent Inequalities 

of Short Period in Sun Spot Areas and in Diurnal Temperature Ranges at 

Toronto and Kew. Proc. Roy. Soc., 37. 1884. 
Note on a Preliminary Comparison between the dates of Cyclonic Storms in Great 

Britain and those of Magnetic Disturbances at the Kew Observatory. Proc. 

Roy. Soc., 38. 1885. 
On a Comparison between Apparent Inequalities of Short Period in Sun Spot Areas 

and in Diurnal Declination Ranges at Toronto and at Prague. Proc. Roy. Soc., 

40. 1886. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART in conjunction with WARREN DE LA RUE, F.R.S., and 
BENJAMIN LOEWY. 

On . . . Solar Physics and . . . the Sun Spot Period. Proc. Roy. Soc., 20. 1872. 
Further Investigations on Planetary Influences upon Solar Activity. Proc. Roy. Soc., 

20. 1872. 
On a Tendency observed in Sun Spots to change alternately from one Solar Hemisphere 

to the other. Proc. Roy. Soc., 21. 1873. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART and WILLIAM DODGSON. 

Note on the Inequalities of the Diurnal Range of the Declination Magnet as recorded 

at the Kew Observatory. Proc. Roy. Soc., 28. 1879. 
On the Existence of certain Short Periods common to Solar and Terrestrial Phenomena. 

Proc. Roy. Soc., 29. 1879. 
On a Method of Detecting the Unknown Inequalities of a Series of Observations. 

Prof. Roy. Soc., 29. 1879. 
An Analysis of the Recorded Diurnal Ranges of Magnetic Declination, with the view 

of ascertaining if these are composed of inequalities which exhibit a true 

periodicity. Manchester Memoirs [3], 8. 1881. 

CC 



Professor BALFOUR STEWART and W. VV. HALDANE GEE. 

Lessons in Practical Physics. Vol. 1, 1885; Vol.2, 1887. Macmillan and Co. 
Lessons in Practical Physics for Schools. Macmillan and Co. 1888. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART and MORISABRO HIRAOKA. 

A Comparison of the Variations of the Diurnal Range of Magnetic Declination as 
recorded at the Observatories of Kew and Trevandrum. Proc. Roy. Sof., 28. 
1879. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART in conjunction with Father S. J. PERRY, F.R.S. 

A Comparison of certain Simultaneous Fluctuations of the Declination at Kew and at 
Stonyhurst during the years 1883 and 1884. Proc. Roy. Soc., 39, 1885. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART and WILLIAM STROUD, D.Sc. 

On the Results obtained from a Modification of Bunsen's Calorimeter. Phil. Mag. [5], 
12. 1881. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART in conjunction with Professor P. G. TAIT, F.R.S. 

The Unseen Universe. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1875; i5th impression, 1888. 

Paradoxical Philosophy. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1878 ; reprinted 1879. 

On the Heating of a Disc by Rapid Rotation in Vacuo. Proc. Roy. Soc., 21. 1878. 

Professor BALFOUR STEWART and others. 

Three Reports of the Committee appointed for the purpose of considering the best 
Means of Comparing or Reducing Magnetic Observations. Brit. Assoc. Reports. 
1885, 1886, 1887. 

ROBERT W. STEWART, B.Sc. (see CHARLES H. LEES). 

WILLIAM STROUD, D.Sc. (see Professor BALFOUR STEWART and W. W. HALDANE GEE). 

GEORGE WILSON, D.Sc., A.M.Inst.C.E. 

On the Reactions of Continuous Beams. Proc. Roy. Soc., 62. 1897. 
Deflection of Beams. Proc. Soc. Mechan. Engineers, 1 and 2. 1898. 
Experiments on the Relation between Uniform Stress and Permanent Strain in Annealed 

Copper Bars and Wires. Manchester Memoirs, 43. 1899. 
Extension of Iron, Steel, and Copper. Proc. Soc. Mechan. Engineers, 4. 1899. 

X. CHEMISTRY.! 1 ) 

J. L. HOSKYNS ABRAHALL, B.A., Ph.D. 

The Atomic Weight of Boron. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1892. 

H. A. AUDEN, D.Sc., and G. J. FOWLER, M.Sc. 

The Action of Nitric Oxide on some Metallic Salts. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1895. 

(') See p. 170, note. 



H. A. AUDEN, D.Sc., Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S., and J. L. ROSE, B.Sc. 
Experiments on the Syntheses of Camphoric Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

E. H. BAGNALL, B.Sc. 

On Methane Trisulphonic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., Ph.D. 

Tutorial Chemistry Non-Metals. W. B Clivs. 1896. 

First Stage, Inorganic Chemistry. W. B. Clive. 1896. 

Tutorial Chemistry Metals. W. B. Clive. 1897. 

Advanced Stage, Inorganic Chemistry. W. B. Clive. 1898. 

Metals and their Compounds. W. B. Clive. 1898. 

On some Vanadates of the Amines. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1884. 

The Separation and Estimation of Zirconium (2 parts). Journ. Chem. Soc. 1886. 

Analysis of Koppite (2 papers). Journ. Chem. Soc. 1886. 

An Apparatus for the determination of the Temperature of Decomposition of Salts. 

Proc. Chem. Soc. 1886. 
Determination of Atomic Weights by means of the Normal Sulphate. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1887. 

Interpretation of Absorption Spectra. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1887. 
Absorption Spectra of the Rare Earths. Ber. 1887. 
A Double Sulphate of Lead and Alumina. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1887. 
Components of the Rare Earths yielding Absorption Spectra. Ber. 1887. 
Estimation and occurrence of Sulphur in Coal. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1889. 
The Atomic Weight of Zirconium. Proc. Roy. Soc., 46. 1889. 

On the Vitrified Cement from an Ancient Fort. Manchester Memoirs [4], 2. 1889. 
Town Air as contrasted with that of the Country. Manchester Memoirs [4], 8. 

1893. 
Article on Wood Distillation, in Thorpe's Dictionary of Applied Chemistry. Longmans 

and Co. 1893. 
A Method of Testing for Silicic Acid. Studies from the Physical and Chemical Laboratory 

of the Owens College, 1. 1893. 
The Atmosphere of Manchester. Studies from the Physical and Chemical Laboratory of 

the Owens College, 1. 1893. 

Stability of the Oxides in relation to the Periodic Law. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 
Volatilisation of Salts during Evaporation. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 
Volatilisation of Salts during Evaporation. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1896. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and J. C. CAIN, D.Sc. 

A Simple and Rapid Method of Gravimetric Analysis. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 
1892. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and E. E. DOWSON. 

A Peroxide of Titanium. Studies from the Physical and Chemical Laboratories of the 
Owens College. 1893. 



( 1 84 ) 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and T. EWAN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 

Micro-organisms and Impurities in Town Air. Journ. of State Medicine, 2. 1894. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and G. J. FOWLER, M.Sc. 

Elements of Qualitative Analysis. J. E. Cornish. 1900. 

On Silver Suboxide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1887. 

Some Reactions of the Halogen Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1888. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and VV. B. HOPKINS. 

Behaviour of Copper Oxide at High Temperatures. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1890. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and J. H. JOHNSTON, B.Sc. 

On some points in the Analysis of Water. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1899. 

G. H. BAILEY, D.Sc., and T. C. LAMB. 

Atomic Weight of Palladium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1892. 

H. BAKER. 

On some Thionates. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 1877. 

On some Fluorine Compounds of Vanadium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

A Study of certain Cases of Isomorphism. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

On a Crystal of Diamond. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

Orthovanadates of Sodium and their Analogues. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1885. 

H. BAKER and S. SUGUIRA. 

On Magnesium Vanadates. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

P. PHILLIPS BEDSON, M.A., D.Sc. 

On some Compounds of Ether with Anhydrous Metallic Chlorides. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1876. 

Ueber isomere Bromnitrophenylessigsauren. Ber. 1877. 
Ueber isomere Bromamidophenylessigsauren. Ber. 1877. 
On some Derivatives of Phenyl-acetic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

P. PHILLIPS BEDSON, D.Sc., and A. J. KING, B.Sc. 

Acetylorthoamidobenzoic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

P. PHILLIPS BEDSON, D.Sc., and W. CARLETON WILLIAMS, B.Sc. 

Ueber die Bestimmung des specifischen Brechungsvermogens fester Korper in ihren 
Losungen. Ber. 1881. 

W. H. BENTLEY, D.Sc., EDWARD HAWORTH, D.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., 
F.R.S. 

On Phenoxy-derivatives of Malonic Acid and Acetic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 



W. H. BENTLEY, D.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

Note on y-Acetobutyric Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

The reduction of Xylic Acid, of Paraxylic Acid, of Terephthalic Acid, and the Preparation 
of Methylterephthalic Acid and Methylisophthalic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 
Experiments on the Syntheses of Camphoric Acid. Journ, Chem. Soc. 1898. 

W. H. BENTLEY, D.Sc., Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S., and JOCELYN F. THORPE, Ph.D. 
On Cis- and Trans-methylisopropylsuccinic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

WILLIAM A. BONE, D.Sc., Ph.D. 

Studies on the Indoxazene Reaction. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1893. 

The Explosion of Acetylene with less than its own Volume of Oxygen. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1897. 

An Improved Form of Gas Analysis Apparatus. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1898. 
(See also BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., and below.) 

W. A. BONE, D.Sc., and J. C. CAIN, D.Sc. 

The Incomplete Combustion of Gaseous Carbon Compounds. Proc. Chem. Soc. 
1894. 

W. A. BONE, D.Sc., and D. S. JERDAN, M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D. 

The Direct Union of Carbon and Hydrogen. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 

W. A. BONE, D.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

The Condensation of Ethylic Trimethylenedicarboxylate with Ethylic Malonate. Journ. 

Chem. Soc. 1895. 

Trimethylsuccinic and aa.-Dimethylsuccinic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1895. 
Note on the aa.-Dimethylglutaric Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 
The Symmetrical Dimethylsuccinic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

W. A. BONE, and C. H. G. SPRANKLING, B.Sc. 

Researches on the Alkyl-substituted Succinic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
The Symmetrical Diisopropylsuccinic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

H. BOOTH (see T. MINIATI). 

J. BOWER, M.Sc. (see R. H. JONES). 

N. E. BOWTELL, B.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

The Action of Alcoholic Potash on Monobromoglutaric Ester. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899 

BOHUSLAV BRAUNER, Ph.D. 

Contributions to the Chemistry of the Rare Earths; Cerite Metals, Pts. I., II., and III. 
Journ. Chem. Soc. 1882, 1883, and 1885. 

J. T. BRIERLEY. 

Electrolytic Preparation of Vanadious Sulphate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1 886. 
On some New Vanadium Compounds. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1886. 



( '86 ) 


H. E. BROTHERS, B.Sc. (see WATSON SMITH). 

F. BROWNSWORD, M.Sc. (see J. B. COHEN). 

CHAS. A. BURGHARDT, Ph.D. 

On the Origin of some Ores of Copper. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 17 (2 parts). 

1878. 
On the Decomposition of Water by Iron Pyrites. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 17. 

1878. 
Note on the occurrence of Dioptase on Chrysocolla from Peru. Manch. Lit. and Phil. 

Soc. Proc., 17. 1878. 

Mineralogical Notes. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 18. 1879. 
Preliminary Note on a new Method of Rapidly Determining the Total Organic Carbon 

in Water. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 25. 1886. 
The Pollution of the River Irwell and its Tributaries. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 25. 1886. 
The Determination of the Total Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in Waters by means of 

Standard Solutions. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 26. 1886. 
On some applications of Caustic Soda or Potash and Carbon in the Qualitative and 

Quantitative Analysis of Minerals. Manchester Memoirs [4], 3. 1889. 
On a Rapid Method for the Accurate Recognition of Sulphides, Arsenides, Antimonides, 

and Double Compounds of these bodies with Metals. Mineralogical Magazine, 9. 

1891. 
The Chemistry of Sewage Treatment. Proc. Incorp. Assoc. of Municipal and County 

Engineers, 18. 1892. 

The Indiarubber Manufacture. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1883. 
Article on Indiarubber in Thorpe's Dictionary of Applied Chemistry. Longmans and Co. 

1891. 

E. BURY, M.Sc. (see G. J. FOWLER). 

L. ST. G. BYNE M.Sc. (see G. J. FOWLER). 

J. C. CAIN, D.Sc. (see G. H. BAILEY, W. A. BONE, J. B. COHEN, and HAROLD B. DIXON). 

THOMAS CARNELLEY, D.Sc. 

On the Vanadates of Thallium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1872. 

On a Colorimetric Method of determining Iron in Water. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 

1874. 
Analysis of one of the Trefriw Mineral Waters. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 14. 

1874. 
Note on the Effect of passing the Mixed Vapours of Carbon Disulphide and Alcohol 

over Red Hot Copper. Journ. Ctiem. Soc. 1875. 

On the Action of Water and Various Saline Solutions on Copper. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876. 
On a Colorimetrical Method of determining Small Quantities of Copper. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1876. 
On Tolyl-phenyl, a New Hydrocarbon. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876. 



THOMAS CARNELLEV, D.Sc. continued. 

On High Melting Points, with special reference to those of Metallic Salts, Pts. I.-IV. 

Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876, 1877, and 1878. 
On the Oxidation of Ditolyl. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 
(See also F. W. SHAW, and below.) 

THOMAS CARNELLEY, D.Sc., and L. T. O'SHEA, B.Sc. 
On Tetrabromide of Tin. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

THOMAS CARNELLEY, D.Sc., and W. CARLETON WILLIAMS, B.Sc. 

Determination of High Boiling Points. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

On the Boiling Points of certain Metals and Metallic Salts. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

The Melting and Boiling Points of certain Inorganic Substances. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

H. C. HAROLD CARPENTER, B.A., Ph.D., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

The action of Ethylene Dibromide and Trimethylene Dibromide on the Sodium Derivative 
of Ethyl Cyanacetate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

D. L. CHAPMAN, B.A. 

The Allotropic Modifications of Phosphorus. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
On the Rate of Explosion in Gases. Phil. Mag. [5], 47. 1899. 

D. L. CHAPMAN, B.A., and F. AUSTIN LIDBURY, B.Sc. 

Non-existence of the so-called Suboxide of Phosphorus. Journ. Chem Soc. 1899. 

LUDWIG CLAISEN, Ph.D. 

Ueber die Einwirkung von Natriumalkylaten auf Benzaldehyd. Ber. 1887. 

A. CLAPAREDE (see WATSON SMITH). 

Professor R. B. CLIFTON, M.A., F.R.S. (see H. E. ROSCOE, and MATHEMATICS, etc., p. 171). 

J. B. COHEN, Ph.D. 

The Action of Hydrochloric Acid on certain Metals. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 26. 1886. 

On some Double Thiosulphates. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1887. 
On Dibenzanilide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1891. 
Wiborgh's Method for the Analysis of Sulphur in Iron and Steel. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 

1890. 
(See also THOMAS EWAN, T. MINIATI, W. R. ORMANDY, and below.) 

"]. B. COHEN, Ph.D., and F. BROWNSWORD, M.Sc. 

On a Product of Distillation of Resin. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1890. 

J. B. COHEN, Ph.D., and J. C. CAIN, D.Sc. 

On the Action of Acetic Acid on Phenyl Thiocarbonide. Journ. Chem. Sec. 1891. 



( 1 88 ) 

J. B. COHEN, Ph.D., and JAMES GRANT. 

A Method for determining Alkalies in the presence of Sulphites. Journ, Soc. Chetn. Ind. 
1890. 

J. B. COHEN, Ph.D., and R. W. ODDY. 

A Comparison of Methods for estimating Organic Nitrogen. Journ. Soc. Chetn. Ind. 
1890. 

R. \V. COLLINSON, B.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 
Lauronolic Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1898 

H. G. COLMAN, M.Sc., Ph.D., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 
Derivatives of Pentamethylene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1888. 

F. J. H. COUTTS, M.D. (see WATSON SMITH, and also MATERIA MEDICA, etc., p. 222, and 
PATHOLOGY, p. 227). 

C. F. CROSS, B.Sc. 

On Primary Normal Heptyl Alcohol and some of its Derivatives. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1876. 
Rehydration of certain Metallic Oxides. Journ. Chem, Soc. 1879. 

C. F. CROSS, B.Sc., and A. J. HIGGIN. 

On the Decomposition of Water by certain Metalloids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

C. F. CROSS, B.Sc., and S. SUGUIRA. 

Action of the Halogens at High Temperatures upon Metallic Oxides. Journ. Chem. Soc. 
1878. 

A. W. CROSSLEY, D.Sc., Ph.D. (see A. SCHUSTER, under MATHEMATICS, etc., p. 179, and below). 

A. W. CROSSLEY, D.Sc., Ph.D., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 
Substituted Pimelic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

Decomposition of Camphoric Acid by Fusion with Potash or Soda. Journ. Chem. Soc. 
1898. 

J. K. CROW, D.Sc. 

On some Derivatives of Allylacetone. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

R. S. DALE, B.A., and Professor C. SCHORLEMMER. 
On Aurine. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1871. 
On Aurin. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1873. 
Suberone. Journ. Chem. Soc., 1874, 1879, and 1881. 
Note on Safranine. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 
Suberic and Azelaic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 
Transformation of Aurin into Rosaniline. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 
Ueber die Umwandlung des Aurins in Rosanilin. (3 papers.) Ber., 10. 1877. 
On Aurin. Part II. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

Transformation of Aurin into Trimethylpararosaniline (printed by mistake Triphenyl- 
pararosaniline). Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 



( 1 89 ) 

WM. DANCER, B.Sc. 

On the Mode of Preparation and Properties of Hypobromous Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 
1862. 

WM. H. DARLING, B.Sc. 

Researches on Di-Methyl. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1868. 

-G. W. DAVIES (see WATSON SMITH). 
W. DITTMAR, F.R.S. (see H. E. ROSCOE). 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON, M.A., F.R.S. 

The Rate of Explosions. Evening Discourse before the British Association. Brit. 

Assoc. Report. 1887. 

Report of Committee on Standards of Light. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1888. 
On the Union of Hydrogen and Nitrogen. Manchester Memoirs [4], 1. 1888. 
On the Authorship of the Law of Equal Dilatation of Gases by Heat. Manchester 

Memoirs [4], 4. 1890. 
First Report of Royal Commission on Explosions from Coal Dust in Mines. Eyre and 

Spottiswoode. 1 89 1 . 

On the Explosion of Carbonic Oxide and Oxygen. Manchester Memoirs [4], 5. 1892. 
The Rate of Explosion in Gases. Bakerian Lecture. Phil. Trans., \. 1893. 
La Vitesse de Detonation dans les Melanges gazeux. Revue Generate des Sciences. 1893. 
Memoir of the late Carl Schorlemmer. Manchester Memoirs [4], 7. 1893. 
Second Report of Royal Commission on Explosions from Coal Dust in Mines. Eyre and 

Spottiswoode. 1894. 
Report to the Home Secretary on the Albion Colliery Explosion. Eyre and Spottiswoode. 

1894. 
Presidential Address to the Chemical Section of the British Association. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1894. 
Report to the Home Secretary of the Committee on Compressed Gas Cylinders. Eyre 

and Spottiswoode. 1895. 
The Mode of Formation of Carbonic Acid in the Burning of Carbon Compounds. Journ. 

Chem. Soc. 1896. 

On Reflected Waves in the Explosion of Gases. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1896. 
On the Mode of Burning of Carbon. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
(See also J. A. HARKER, BEVAN LEAN, and below.) 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON, in conjunction with H. BRERETON BAKER, M.A. 
The Chemical Inactivity of Rontgen Rays. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON and J. C. CAIN, D.Sc. 

On the Instantaneous Pressures produced in the Explosion Wave. Manchester Memoirs 
[ 4 ], 8. 1894. 

DD 



( '90 ) 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON and J. A. MARKER, D.Sc. 

On the Combination of Hydrogen and Chlorine alone, and in presence of other Gases. 

Manchester Memoirs [4], 3. 1 889. 
The Rate of Explosion of Hydrogen and Chlorine in the Dry and in the Moist State. 

Manchester Memoirs [4], 4. 1 890. 
The Detonation of Chlorine Peroxide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON and J. D. PETER KIN, B.Sc. 

On the Action of Nitric Oxide on Nitrogen Peroxide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON and E. J. RUSSELL, B.Sc. 

On the Combustion of Carbon Disulphide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
Explosion of Chlorine Peroxide with Carbonic Oxide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON and H. VV. SMITH, B.Sc. 

Incompleteness of Combustion in Gaseous Explosions. Manchester Memoirs [4], 2. 
1888. 

Professor HAROLD B. DIXON, E. H. STRANGE, M.Sc., and E. GRAHAM, M.Sc. 
The Explosion of Cyanogen. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

E. E. DOWSON (see G. H. BAILEY). 

GIBSON DYSON, Ph.D. 

Some Compounds of Phenols with Amido-bases. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1883. 

GIBSON DYSON, Ph.D., and ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 

The Combination of Chlorine with Carbon Monoxide under the Influence of Light. 
Proc. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

THOMAS EWAN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 

On the Absorption-Spectra of some Copper Salts in Aqueous Solution. Phil. Mag. [5], 

33. 1892. 
On the Osmotic Pressure of Solutions of Finite Concentration. Manchester Memoirs [4], 8. 

1894; and Zeitschrift fiir phys. Chem., 14, 1894. 

On the Absorption Spectra of Dilute Solutions. Proc. Roy. Soc., 57. 1 894. 
(See also G. H. BAILEY, and below.) 

THOMAS EWAN, M.Sc., and J. B. COHEN, Ph.D. 

Oxidation Products of Acenaphthene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1 889 

THOMAS EWAN, M.Sc., and W. W. HALDANE GEE, B.Sc. 

On the Comparison of Thermometers. Manchester Memoirs 4], 4. 1891. 

THOMAS EWAN, M.Sc., and W. R. ORMANDY. 

A Method of Measuring the Vapour Pressures of Solutions. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1892. 



EMILY C. FORTE Y, B.Sc. 

On Hexamethylene and its Derivatives. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1898. 

GILBERT J. FOWLER, M.Sc., F.I.C. 

Nitride of Iron. Brit. Assoe. Report and Chem. News. 1893. 

Experiments with Silver Permanganate. Studies from the Physical and Chemical Labora- 
tories of the Owens College. 1893. 

On the Occurrence of Fossil Carbon of Animal Origin. Studies from the Physical and 
Chemical Laboratories of the Owens College. 1893. 

(See also H. A. AUDEN, G. H. BAILEY, and below.) 

GILBERT J. FOWLER, M.Sc., and E. BURY, M.Sc. 

On Persulphide of Lead. Studies from the Physical and Chemical Laboratories of the 
Owens College. 1893. 

GILBERT J. FOWLER, M.Sc., and L. ST. G. BYNE, M.Sc. 

On the Volatility of Antimony and Arsenic in different Gases. Studies from the Physical 
and Chemical Laboratories of the Owens College. 1 893. 

GILBERT J. FOWLER, M.Sc., and JAMES GRANT. 

The influence of Different Oxides on the Decomposition of Potassium Chlorate. Journ. 
Chem. Soc. 1890. 

GILBERT J. FOWLER, M.Sc., and P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc. 

On certain Silver Alloys. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1895. 

Professor Sir EDWARD FRANKLAND, K.C.B., Ph.D., F.R.S. 

Researches on the Organic Radicals. Part. III. On the Action of Solar Light upon 

Iodide of Ethyl. Journ. Chem. Soc., 3. 1851. 
Contributions to the Knowledge of the Manufacture of Gas. Manchester Memoirs [2], 10. 

1852. 

On a New Series of Organic Bodies containing Metals. Phil. Trans. 1852. 
On the Employment of Chemical Light for Artificial Illumination. Roy. Institut. Proc., 

I- 1853. 
On the Dependence of the Chemical Properties of Compounds upon the Electrical 

Character of their Constituents. Roy. Institut. Proc. 1. 1854. 

On a Mode of Conserving the Alkaline Sulphates in Alums. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1855. 
Zur Geschichte der organischen Metallverbindungen. Liebig Annal y 95. 1855. 
Researches on Organo- Metallic Bodies : Zinc Ethyl. Phil. 2^rans. 1855. 
On a New Series of Compounds derived from Ammonia and its Analogues. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 8. 1856. 
Researches on Organo-Metallic Bodies : On a New Series of Acids containing Nitrogen. 

Proc. Roy. Soc., 8. 1856. Phil. Trans. 1857. 



( '92 ) 

P. C. FREER and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

Experiments on the Synthesis of Heptamethylene Derivatives. Journ. Chem. Soe. 1888. 
Some Derivatives of Hexamethylene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1888. 

A. W. GILBODY, M.Sc., Ph.D., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 
On Brasilin and on Haematoxylin (3 papers). Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

W. GOODWIN and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

On /3^-Dimethylglutaric Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

On Cis- and Trans-hexahydro-orthotoluic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1895. 

i;. GRAHAM, M.Sc. (see HAROLD B. DIXON). 

JAMES GRANT (see J. B. COHEN and GILBERT J. FOWLER). 

HARRY GRIMSHAW. 

On Ethyl-Amyl. Chem. Soc. Journ. 1873. 

On Basic Calcium Chloride. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1874. 

HARRY GRIMSHAW and Professor C. SCHORLEMMER, F.R.S. 

CEnanthylic Acid and Normal Heptyl Alcohol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1873. 
Normal Primary Heptyl Alcohol. Proc. Roy. Soc., 21, 1873. 

FREDERICK GUTHRIE, Ph.D., B.Sc., F.R.S. 

Ueber Amyloxydphosphorsaure. Liebig Annal., 99. 1856. 

On the Sulphovinates, and on Amylophosphoric Acid and the Amylophosphates. Jvurn. 

Chem. Soc. 1857. 

On Iodide of Acetyl. Phil. Mag. [4], 14. 1857. 
On the Preparation of the Double Ethers. Phil. Mag. [4], 14. 1857. 
On the Action of Light upon Chloride of Silver. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1858. 
Contributions to the Knowledge of the Amyl Group. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1859. 

J. B. HANNAY, F.R.S.E. 

Note on a New Manganese Reaction. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

The Action of Bromine on Sulphur. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

New Process for the Volumetric Estimation of Cyanides. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

On Silicious Fossilization. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 1878. 

On a New Calorimeter. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 1878. 

The Action of Chlorine upon Iodine. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

The Action of Bromine on Sulphur. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

The Examination of Substances by the "Time Method." Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879. 

On the Microrheometer. Phil. Trans. 1879. 

ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 

The Action of Silicon Chloride on the Aromatic Amido-compounds. fourn. Chem. Soc. 

1887. 
/3-Nitroso-a-Naphthylamine. Liebig Annal., 255. 1890. 



( 193 ) 

ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. continued. 

The Specific Gravity of Solutions of Naphthalene in Benzene. Studies from the Physical 

and Chemical Laboratories of the Owens College. 1893. 
The Composition of some Ancient Bronze and Iron Implements. Manchester Memoirs, 

41. 1897. 
(See also GIBSON DYSON and H. E. ROSCOE, and VV. \V. HALDANE GEE, under 

MATHEMATICS, etc., p. 172.) 

J. A. HARKER, D.Sc. 

Some Experiments on the Latent Heat of Steam. Manchester Memoirs [4], 10. 1896. 
On the Determination of Freezing Points. Proc. Roy. Sot., 60. 1896. 
On a New Alloy of very high Specific Resistance. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1896. 
(See also HAROLD B. DIXON, P. J. HARTOG, and below.) 

J. A. HARKER, D.Sc., and Professor HAROLD B. DIXON, F.R.S. 

On the Decomposition by Shock of Endothermic Compounds. Manchester Memoirs [4], 5. 
1892. 

J. A. HARKER, D.Sc., and P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc. 

On a Delicate Calorimeter. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1892. 

J. A. HARKER, D.Sc., and JOHN WILD, B.Sc. 

On the influence of Ultraviolet Light on the Combination of Hydrogen and Chlorine. 
Electrician. 1896. 

P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc. 

On the Law of Definite Proportions. Nature, 41. 1894. 

On the Distinction between Mixtures and Compounds. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1894. 

The Owens College, Manchester. Record of Technical and Secondary Education. 1895. 

Articles on August Matthiessen, John Mercer, John Mayow, George Pearson, John Percy, 

Robert Porrett, Joseph Priestley, Sir Francis Ronalds, Carl Schorlemmer, Francis 

Slare, Robert Angus Smith, Balfour Stewart, Warren de la Rue, Sir William 

Watson, George Wilson, Peter Woulfe, James Young, and other chemists and 

physicists. Dictionary of National Biography. 1894-1900. 

(See also GILBERT J. FOWLER, J. A. HARKER, and below.) 

P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc., and J. A. HARKER, D.Sc. 

A New Form of Apparatus for the Determination of the Freezing Points of Solutions. 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1890. 
Preliminary Experiments on the Latent Heat of Steam. Manchester Mtmoirs [4], 8. 

1893. 

P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc., and C. H. LEES, D.Sc. 

Article on William Hyde Wollaston. Dictionary of National Biography. 1900 

P. J. HARTOG, B.Sc., and W. E. SIMS, M.Sc. 

On Thionyl Bromide. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1893. 



( '94 ) 

EDWARD HAWORTH, D.Sc. (see W. H. BENTLEY, and below). 

EDWARD HAWORTH, D.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

Synthesis of Pentamethylene Dicarboxylic Acid, Hexamethylene Dicarboxylic Acid, 

and Azelaic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 
Hexamethylene Dibromide and its action on Sodium and on Ethylic Sodic Malonate. 

Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

On Pentamethylene Dicarboxylic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 
Note on the preparation of Glycol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 
On Cis- and Trans- methylene 1.3 Dicarboxylic Acids and the Condensation of Formaldehyde 

with Ethylic Malonate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1898. 

J. L. HEINKE, D.Sc., and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

The action of Ethylic j8-Iodopropionate on the Sodium derivative of Ethylic Isopropyl 
Malonate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1896. 

A. J. HIGGIN (see C. F. CROSS). 

J. T. HOBSON. 

On a New Series of Organo-Thionic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1858. 

W. HOLT and W. E. SIMS, M.Sc. 

On the Oxidation of the Alkali Metals. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

W. B. HOPKINS (see G. H. BAILEY). 
F. HOWLES, B.Sc. (see J. F. THORPE). 

WM. ROBERT JEKY'LL. 

On the Action of Sulphuric Acid on Diallyl. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 10. 
1870. 

D. S. JERDAN, M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D. 

A New Synthesis of Phloroglucinol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 

The Condensation of Ethylic Acetonedicarboxylate and Constitution of Triethylic Orcinol- 

tricarboxylate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
(See also W. A. BONE.) 

J. H. JOHNSTON, B.Sc. (see G. H. BAILEY). 

R. H. JONES, M.Sc., and J. BOWER, M.Sc. 

On the Collision of two Explosion Waves. Manchester Memoirs, 42. 1 898. 

WM. E. KAY. 

On the Sulphides of Vanadium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

A. J. KING, B.Sc. (see P. PHILLIPS BEDSON). 
T. C. LAMB (see G. H. BAILEY). 



( '95 ) 

WILLIAM M. TREVOR LAWRENCK, B.A., Ph.D. 

A New Synthesis of Citric Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 

Hydrolysis of the y-Cyanides of the di-substituted Aceto-Acetates. Journ. Chem. Sot. 

1899. 
The Synthesis and Preparation of Terebic and Terpenylic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soi. 

1899. 

Kthylic /3/J-Dimethyl Propanetetracarboxylate. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
Methylisoamylsuccinic Acid. Part I. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A. 

Homologues of Butanetetracarboxylic Acid and of Adipic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

On the Affinities of Polybasic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

On Ethylic Dibromobutanetetracarboxylic Acid and the Synthesis of Dihydroxyfurfuran 

aa'-dicarboxylic Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
(See also W. H. PERKIN, and below.) 

BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A., and W. A. BONE, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

A New Method of determining the Pressures in Gaseous Explosions. Brit. Assoc. Report. 

1892. 

The Behaviour of Ethylene on Explosion with less than its own Volume of Oxygen. 
Journ. Chem. Soc. 1892. 

BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A., and Professor H. B. DIXON, F.R.S. 

On the Transmission of Explosions across Air Gaps. Manchester Memoirs [4], 5. 1892. 
On the Length of Flame produced by the Explosion of Gases in Tubes. Manchester 
Memoirs [4], 7. 1893. 

BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A., and F. H. LEES. 

Interaction of Ethylenic Chloride, Ethylic Malonate, and Sodium Ethoxide. Journ. 
Chem. Soc. 1897. 

BEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A., and VV. H. WHATMOUGH, B.Sc. 

A New Method of preparing Pure Iodine. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1898. 

F. H. LEES (see BEVAN LEAN, and below). 

F. H. LEES, and Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., F.R.S. 

The action of Aluminium Chloride on Camphoric Anhydride. Proc. Chem. Sue. 1898. 
On Pseudocampholacton and Pseudolauronolic Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

F. AUSTIN LIDBURV (see D. L. CHAPMAN). 

A. McDouGALL, B.Sc. 

On a Mode of Measuring the Relative Sensitiveness of Photographic Papers. Journ 
Chem. Soc. 1865. 

T. MINIATI, H. BOOTH, and J. B. COHEN, Ph.D. 

On Ortho- and Para-nitro-toluene, and Ortho- and Para-nitro-toluidine. fourn. Chem. Soc 
Ind. 1887. 



( 196 ) 

T. M. MORGAN. 

On the Paraffins existing in Pennsylvanian Petroleum. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1875. 

E. H. MORTON (see T. E. THORPE). 

M. M. PATTISON MUIR, M.A. 

Nitrosyl Tribromide and Sulphur Bromide. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1875. 

On Bismuth Compounds, Parts I. -VI. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876 and 1877. 

On Mode of Estimating Small Quantities of Lead and Copper. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1876. 

Note on Perbromates. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876. 
On the Solubility of Potassium Perchlorate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1876. 
On certain Circumstances which affect the Purity of Water supplied for Domestic 

Purposes. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 
On a Process for Estimating Bismuth Volumetrically. Parts I. and II. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1877. 
On the Solvent Action of various Saline Solutions upon Lead. Parts I. and II. 

Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 

The Detection of Small Quantities of Bismuth. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 
Modifications of Hofmann's Vapour Density Apparatus. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 
(See also S. SUGUIRA.) 

R. W. ODDV (see J. B. COHEN). 

W. R. ORMANDY (see THOMAS EWAN, and below). 

W. R. ORMANDY and J. B. COHEN, Ph.D. 

A New Method for the Estimation of Nitrites and Nitrates in Water. Journ. Chem. 
Soc. 1890. 

L. T. O'SHEA (see THOMAS CARNELLEY). 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., Ph.D., F.R.S. 

Sulpho-camphylic Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1893. 

The Cis- and Trans- modifications of Tetramethylene Dicarboxylic, and Pentamethylene 

Dicarboxylic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 
Derivatives of Pentamethylene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 
Some derivatives of Propionic Acid, of Acrylic Acid, and of Glutaric Acid. Journ. 

Chem. Soc. 1896. 
On Sulpho-camphylic Acid, with remarks on the constitution of Camphoric Acid. Joxni. 

Chem. Soc. 1897. 

Isolauronolic Acid and some of its derivatives. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1898. 
The Oxidation of Sulphocamphylic acid Journ Chem. Soc. 1899. 
(See also H. A. AUDEN, W. H. BENTLEY, W. A. BONE, N. E. BOWTELL, H. C. H. 

CARPENTER, R. W. COLLINSON, H. G. COLMAN, A. W. CROSSLEY, P. C. FREER, 

A. W. GILBODY, W. GOODWIN, EDWARD HAWORTH, J. L. HEINKE, F. H. LEES, 

and below.) 



<97 ) 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., in conjunction with F. STANLEY KIPPING, Ph.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. 
Organic Chemistry. W. and R. Chambers. 1895. 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., and SEVAN LEAN, D.Sc., B.A. 

An Introduction to the Study of Chemistry. Macmillan and Co. 1896. 

Professor VV. H. PERKIN, Jun., and G. REVAV. 

Synthesis of Indene, Hydrindene, and some of their derivatives. Journ. Client. Soc. 1894. 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., and C. H. G. SPRANKLING, B.Sc. 

Aldehydo-propionic Acid and Aldehydo-isobutyric Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., and J. J. SUDBOROUGH, D.Sc. 
The Reduction of Acid-chlorides. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1895. 

Professor W. H. PERKIN, Jun., and J. F. THORPE, Ph.D. 

The Condensation of Halogen derivatives of Fatty Ethereal Salts \vith Ketones and 

Ketonic Acids. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1896. 
Synthesis of /-Camphoronic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1897. 
Synthesis of Cis- and Trans-caronic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 
Synthesis of a/3/3-Trimethyl-glutaric Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

J. D. PETERKIN, B.Sc. (see HAROLD B. DIXON). 

A. A. READ. 

Behaviour of the more stable Oxides at High Temperatures. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1894. 

G. REVAV (see W. H. PERKIN). 

v 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE, B.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S. 

Elementary Lessons in Chemistry. Macmillan and Co. ist edition, 1866. 32nd 

impression, 1897. 
Lectures on Spectrum Analysis. ist edition, 1869. 4th edition, in conjunction with 

Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, F.R.S., 1886. Macmillan and Co. 

Chemistry : Science Primer, ist edition, 1872. 25th impression, 1900. Macmillan and Co. 
On the Influence of Light upon Chlorine, Phil. Mag. [4], 14. 1857. 
Some Chemical Facts respecting the Atmosphere of Dwelling-houses. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1858. 
On the Measurement of the Chemical Action of the Solar Rays. Roy. Institut. Proc., 3. 

1858. 
On the Composition of the Aqueous Acids of Constant Boiling Point (2 papers). Journ. 

Chem Soc. 1861 and 1862. 

On the Alleged Practice of Arsenic-eating in Styria. Manchester Memoirs [3], 1. 1860. 
On Perchloric Acid and its Hydrates. Proc. Roy. Soc., 11. 1862. 
Note on Perchloric Ether. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1862. 
On the Solar Spectrum and the Spectrum of the Chemical Elements. Phil. Mag. [4], 

23. 1862. 

EE 



( '98 ) 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE, B.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Application of the Spectroscope to the Manufacture of Steel by the Bessemer 

Process. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 3. 1862. 
On the Existence of a Crystallizable Carbon Compound and Free Sulphur in the Alais 

Meteorite. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 3. 1862. 
Note on the amount of Carbon Dioxide contained in the Air of Manchester. Manch. Lit. 

and Phil. Soc. Proc., 3. 1862. 
On the Measurement of the Chemical Brightness of Various Portions of the Sun's Disc. 

Proc. Roy. Soc., 12. 1862. 
On the Direct Measurement of the Sun's Chemical Action. Roy. Institut. Proc. 4. 

1863. 
On the Chemical Brightness of the Light emitted by Burning Magnesium Wire. Manch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 3. 1864. 
Note on the Existence of Lithium, Strontium, and Copper in the Bath Waters. Brit. 

Assoc. Report. 1864. 
On the Metal Indium and Recent Discoveries in Spectrum Analysis. Roy. Institut. Proc., 4. 

1866. 
On a Method of Meteorological Registration of the Chemical Action of Total Daylight. 

Phil. Trans. 1865. 
On a Mode of Preparing Sealed Bulbs containing equal volumes of Chlorine and Hydrogen. 

Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 4. 1865. 

The Opalescence of the Atmosphere. Roy. Institut. Proc., 4. 1 866. 
On the Isomorphism of Thallium Perchlorate with the Potassium and Ammonium Per- 

chlorates. Journ. Chem. Soc., 4. 1866. 
On the Chemical Intensity of Total Daylight at Kew and Para (1865-1867;. Phil. Trans. 

1867. 

Researches on Vanadium (Pts. I., II., and III.) Phil. Trans. 1868, 1869, and 1870. 
On Vanadium, one of the Trivalent Group of Elements. Roy. Institut. Proc., 5. 1869. 
On Measurements of the Chemical Intensity of Tofal Daylight, made during the recent 

Total Eclipse of the Sun, by Capt. J. Herschell. Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 1871. 
Spectrum Analysis in its Application to the Bessemer Process for the Manufacture of Steel. 

Journ. Iron and Steel Inst., 2. 1871. 

A Study of certain Tungsten Compounds. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1872. 
On the Artificial Production of Alizarine, the Colouring Principle of Madder. Roy. Institut. 

Proc., 6. 1872. 
On a Self-recording Method of Measuring the Intensity of the Chemical Action of Total 

Daylight. Phil. Trans. 1872. 
Some Remarks on Dalton's First Table of Atomic Weights. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 14, and Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1874. 
On a New Uranium Chloride. Journ. Chem. Soc., 12. 1874. 
On Two New Vanadium Minerals. Proc. Roy. Soc., 25. 1877. 
Note on Metallic Niobium, and a New Niobium Chloride. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 17. 1877. 
Specific Gravity of the Vapours of Chlorides of Lead and Thallium. Proc. Roy. Soc., 27. 

1878. 



( 199 ) 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE, B.A., Ph.D., LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Absence of Potassium in Protagon. Proc. Roy. Soc., 30. 1880. 
A Study of some of the Earth-Metals contained in Samarskite. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1882. 
Atomic Weight of Carbon. Acad. Set. Compt. Rend., 94 ; Annales de Chim. [5], 26. 1882. 
On the Spontaneous Polymerization of Volatile Hydrocarbons at the Ordinary Atmospheric 
Temperature. Chem. Soc. Journ. 1885. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE in conjunction with J BAXENDELL. 

Note on the Relative Chemical Intensities of Direct Sunlight and Diffuse Daylight at 
Different Altitudes of the Sun. Proc. Roy. Soc., 15. 1867. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE in conjunction with Professor R. W. BUNSEN. 

Photo-Chemical Researches 

Part I. Measurement of the Chemical Action of Light. Phil. Trans. 1857. 

Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction. Phil. Trans. 1857. 

Part III. Optical and Chemical Extinction of the Chemical Rays. Phil. Trans. 

1857- 
Part IV. Comparative and Absolute Measurement of the Chemical Rays, etc. 

Phil. Trans. 1857 and 1859. 
Part V. -On the Direct Measurement of the Chemical Action of Sunlight. Phil. 

Trans. 1863. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and Professor R. B. CLIFTON, M.A., F.R.S. 

On the Effect of Increased Temperature upon the . . . Light emitted by the Vapour of 
certain Metals or Metallic Compounds. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 2. 1862. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and W. DITTMAR, F.R.S. 

On the Absorption of Hydrochloric Acid and Ammonia in Water. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1860. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and ARTHUR HARDEN, M.Sc., Ph.D. 

A New View of the Origin of Dalton's Atomic Theory. Macmillan & Co. 1896. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and Professor C. SCHORLEMMER, F.R.S. 

A Treatise on Chemistry. Vol. 1, ist edition, 1877, 3rd edition, 1894; Vol. 2, ist 
edition, 1879, 3rd edition, 1897 ; Vol. 3 (6 parts), 1881-1892. Macmillan and Co. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE, in conjunction with H. E. SCHUNCK, F.R.S., and R. ANGUS SMITH, 

F.R.S. 

On the Recent Progress and Present Condition of Manufacturing Chemistry in the South 
Lancashire District. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1861. 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and Professor ARTHUR SCHUSTER, F.R.S. 

On the Absorption Spectrum of Potassium and Sodium at Low Temperatures. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 22. 1874. 

On the Spectrum of Terbium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1882. 
On a Comparison of the Spectra obtained by burning Diamond and Graphite. Manch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 19. 1880. 



( 2OO ) 

Professor Sir H. E. ROSCOE and T. E. THORPE, F.R.S. 

On the Relation between the Sun's Altitude and the Chemical Intensity of Total Daylight 

in a Cloudless Sky. Phil. Trans. 1870. 
On the Measurement of the Chemical Intensity of Total Daylight made at Catania during 

the Total Eclipse of 22nd Dec. 1870. Phil. Trans. 1871. 
On the Absorption Spectrum of Bromine and Iodine Monochloride. Proc. Roy. Soc., 25. 

1877 ; Phil. Trans., 1878. 

J. L. ROSE, B.Sc. (see H. A. AUDEN). 

ROBERT ROUTLEDGE, B.Sc. 

On the composition of Ammonium Amalgam. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 1872. 

E. J. RUSSELL, B.Sc. 

Notes on the Estimation of Gaseous Compounds of Sulphur. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1900. 
The influence of the " nascent " state on the Combination of Carbon Monoxide and 

Oxygen. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1900. 
(See also HAROLD B. DIXON, and below.) 

E. J. RUSSELL, B.Sc., and NORMAN SMITH, B.Sc. 

On the Combination of Sulphur Dioxide and Oxygen. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1900. 

Professor C. SCHORLEMMER, LL.D., F.R.S. ('). 

Manual of the Chemistry of the Carbon Compounds. Macmillan and Co. 1874. 
The Rise and Development of Organic Chemistry, ist edition. J. E. Cornish. 1879. 

2nd edition, edited by Prof. A. SMITHELLS. Macmillan and Co. 1894. 
On the Hydrides of the Alcohol Radicles existing in the Products of the Destructive 

Distillation of Cannel Coal. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1862. 
On the Chemical Constitution of American Rock Oil. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 3. 1863. 

On the Derivatives of Hydride of Heptyl. Journ. Cliem. Soc. 1863. 
On the Chemical Constitution of the so-called Alcohol Radicles. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1863. 

On the Action of Chlorine upon Methyl. Proc. Roy. Soc., 13. 1864. 
On the Identity of Methyl and Hydride of Ethyl. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1864. 
Researches on the Hydrocarbons of the Series C,,H., n -)-.,. Proc. Roy. Soc., 14, 1865 

(2 papers); 16, 1868 (3 papers); 18, 1870; 19, 1871 (2 papers). 
Note on the Hydrocarbons contained in Crude Benzol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1866. 
Note on Ethyl Hexyl Ether. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1866. 

Note on the Amyl Compounds derived from Petroleum. Proc. Roy. Soc., 15. 1867. 
On a New Series of Hydrocarbons derived from Coal-tar. Proc. Roy. Soc., 15. 1867. 
On the Constitution of Capryl Alcohol from Castor-oil. Proc. Roy. Soc., 16. 1868. 
On the Derivatives of Propane (Hydride of Propyl). Proc. Roy. Soc., 17, 1869 ; 18, 

1870 

(') This list has been mainly borrowed from Professor Smithells' edition of Professor Schorlemmer's Rise 
and Development of Organic Chemistry. 



201 

Professor C. SCHORLEMMER, LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Constitution of Hyposulphurous Acid. Journ. Chem. Sac. 1869. 
Formation of Cetyl Alcohol by a singular Reaction. Proc. Roy. So:., 19. 1871 
Berichtigung. Ueber Bleikammerkrystalle. Ber. 1872. 
On the Boiling-points of the Normal Paraffins and some of their Derivatives. Munch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 11. 1872. 
On the Normal Paraffins. Part I. Phil. Trans. 1872. 
On the Heptanes from Petroleum. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1873. 
Ueber die Oenanthylsaure. Ber. 1873. 
An Improved Method for Preparing Marsh Gas. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 13. 

1873- 
The Chemical Constitution of Bleaching Powder. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

13. 1873. 

On the Chemical Constitution of Bleaching Powder. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1874. 
Methylhexylcarbinol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1874. 

Note on the Boiling-point of Methylhexylcarbinol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1875. 
Some Remarks on Mr. T. M. MORGAN'S Paper. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1875. 
On Groves' Method of Preparing Chlorides. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1875. 
On some Reactions of Bromine and Iodine. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 4. 

1875- 

On the Normal Paraffins. Part II. Phil. Trans. 1878. 
On the Normal Paraffins. Part III. Phil. Trans. 1880. 
On the Origin of the Word Chemistry. Manchester Memoirs [3], 7. 1879. 
The Action of Hydrochloric Acid on Ethylene Alcohol. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1881. 
On the Occurrence of Caffeine in the Leaves of Tea and Coffee grown at Kew Gardens. 

Manchester Memoirs [3], 8. 1883. 

On the Leaves of Catha edulis. Manchester Memoirs [3], 8. 1883. 
On the Introduction of Coffee into Arabia. Manchester Memoirs [3], 8. 1883. 
Thionyl Chloride. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1885. 

The History of Creosote, Cedriret, and Pittacal. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1885. 
Reduction der Aldehyde zu Alcoholen. Ann. Chem. Phann., 177. 
(See also R. S. DALE, HARRY GRIMSHAW, and H. E. ROSCOE.) 

Professor C. SCHORLEMMER and T. E. THORPE, F.R.S. 

On the Normal Paraffins. Part IV. Phil. Trans. 1883. 

F. W. SHAW and THOMAS CARNELLEY, D.Sc. 

On the Influence exerted by Ammonium Sulphide in preventing the Action of various 
Solutions on Copper. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1877. 

SAVILLE SHAW, M.Sc. 

On the Preparation of the Pentathionates. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1883. 

T. H. SIMS, B.Sc. 

Contributions to the Knowledge of the Laws of Gas Absorption. Journ. Chem. Soc. 
1861. 



( 202 ) 

W. E. SIMS, M.Sc. (see P. J. HARTOG and W. HOLT). 
H. W. SMITH, ~B.Sc. (see HAROLD B. DIXON). 
NORMAN SMITH, B.Sc. (see E. J. RUSSELL). 

WATSON SMITH, F.I.C. 

On Analyses of the Ash of the Wood of Two Varieties of Eucalyptus. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1880. 

Certain Improvements in Chemical Apparatus. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 
Note on Pentathionic Acid. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1883. 
Note on the Behaviour of the Nitrogen in Coal during Distillation. Journ. Chem. Soc. 

1884. 

On the Recovery of By-products from Coal. Journ. Iron and Steel Inst. 1884. 
On the By-products obtained in the Simon-Carves Coking Process. Journ. Iron and 

Steel Inst. 1885. 

WATSON SMITH and A. CLAPAREDE. 

On a By-product in the Manufacture of Aurin. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1883. 

WATSON SMITH, F. J. H. COUTTS, M.D., and H. E. BROTHERS, B.Sc. 

On the Examination of the Phenol Constituents of Blast Furnace Tar. Journ. Chem. 
Soc. 1884. 

WATSON SMITH and G. W. DAVIES. 

On Pyrene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 

On Molecular Compounds of Naphthalene and Benzene with Antimony Trichloride. 

Journ. Chem. Soc. 1882. 
On Quinoline. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1882. 

WATSON SMITH and ADOLF STAUB. 

On a By-product in the Manufacture of Aurin. Part II. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1884. 
On certain Derivatives of Iso-dinaphthyl. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1885. 

WATSON SMITH and W. B. SYME. 

Analytical Examination of Tar. Journ. Soc. Chem. Ind. 1883. 

WATSON SMITH and T. TAKAMATSU. 

On Pentathionic Acid. Parts I. and II. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880-2'. 

On Phenylnaphthalene. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1881. 

On Sulphonic Acids derived from Iso-dinaphthyl. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1881. 

ARTHUR SMITHELLS, B.Sc. 

On Some Fluorine Compounds of Uranium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1883. 

C. H. G. SPRANKLING, B.Sc. (see W. A. BONE and W. H. PERKIN). 
ADOLF STAUB (see WATSON SMITH). 



2 3 

E. H. STRANGE, M.Sc. (see HAROLD B. DIXON). 

J. J. SUDBOROUGH, Ph.D., D.Sc., F.I.C. 

On the Chlorination of Aniline. Journ. Chem. Sac. 1894. 
Diorthosubstituted Benzoic Acids. Parts I. and II. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1895. 
Action of Sodium Ethoxide on Deoxybenzoin. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1895. 
(See also W. H. PERKIN.) 

S. SUGUIRA (see H. BAKER, C. F. CROSS, and below). 

S. SUGUIRA and M. M. PATTISON MUIR. 

On Essential Oil of Sage. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1878. 

W. B. SYME (see WATSON SMITH). 
T. TAKAMATSU (see WATSON SMITH). 

J. F. THORPE, Ph.D. 

On the Constitution of Ethyl Sodio-cyanacetate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1900. 
(See also W. H. BENTLEV, W. H. PERKIN, and below). 

J. F. THORPE Ph.D., and F. HOWLES, B.Sc. 

/3-Iso-propyl-glutaric Acid. Proc. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

J. F. THORPE, Ph.D., and W. UDALL, B.Sc. 

The Cis-and Trans-/3-phenylbutane-aa,a 2 -tricarboxylic Acids. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1899. 

T. E. THORPE, C.B., Ph.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. 

On the Amount of Carbonic Acid contained in the Air above the Irish Sea. Manch. 

Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 5. 1865. 

On the Amount of Carbonic Acid contained in Sea Air. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1867. 
On the Amount of Carbonic Acid contained in the Atmosphere of Tropical Brazil 

during the Rainy Season. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1867. 
Analysis of the Water of the Holy Well, a Medicinal Spring at Humphrey Head, 

North Lancashire. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1868. 
Note on the Specific Gravity and Boiling Point of Chromyl Dichloride. Journ. Chem. 

Soc. 1868. 
Analysis of the Ashes of a Diseased Orange Tree (Citrus aurantium). fount. Chem. 

Soc. 1868. 

On Nontronite. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1870. 
On a New Chromium Oxychloride. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1870. 
On the Action of Bromine upon Ethylbenzol. Proc. Roy. Soc., 18. 1870. 
(See also H. E. ROSCOE, C. SCHORLEMMER, and below.) 

T. E. THORPE, F.R.S., and E. H. MORTON. 

On the Composition of the Water of the Irish Sea. Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 1870. 



( '04 ) 

G. S. TURPIN, D.Sc., M.A. 

The Duration of Chemical Action in the Explosive Combination of Gases. Studies 
from the Physical and Chemical Laboratories of the Owsns College. 1 893. 

W. UDALL, B.Sc. (see J. F. THORPE). 

W. MARSHALL WATTS, D.Sc. 

On the Absorption of Mixed Gases in Water. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1864. 

W. H. WHATMOUGH, B.Sc. (see BEVAN LEAN). 
JOHN WILD, B.Sc. (see J. A. MARKER). 

W. CARLETON WILLIAMS, B.Sc. 

Contributions to our Knowledge of the Antimony Oxychlorides. Journ. Cheat Sof., 

1872. 
On some Compounds of Antimony Pentachloride with Alcohol and Ether. Journ. 

Chem. Sac. 1876. 
(See also P. PHILLIPS BEDSON and THOMAS CARNELLEY.) 

W. L. WILLS, B.Sc. 

On the Atomic Weight of Tellurium. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1879 

SYDNEY YOUNG, D.Sc., F.R.S. 

Precipitation of Iron with Ammonium Succinate. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1880. 
Note on the Formation of an Alcoholic Fluoride. Journ. Chem. Soc. 1881. 
Hot Ice. Nature, 24. 1881. 



XL NATURAL HISTORY (') 
(including ZOOLOGY, BOTANY, AND GEOLOGY). 

J. H. ASHWORTH, D.Sc. 

On the Structure and Contents of the Tubers of Anthoceros tuberosus. Manchester 

Memoirs, 41. 1896. 
The Stomodaeum, Mesenterial Filaments, and Endoderm of Xenia. Proc. Roy. Soc., 

63. 1898. 
The Structure of Xenia Hicksoni, nov. sp., with some Observations on Heteroxenia 

Elizabelhce. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 42. 1899. 
Report on the Xeniidae collected by Dr. Willey. A. Willey's "Zoological Results^' 

4. Cambridge University Press. In the Press. 
(See also F. W. GAMBLE.) 

(') Four volumes of Studies from the Biological Laboratories of the Owens College have been published 
(J. E. Cornish, Manchester), vol. 1 in 1886, vol. 2 in 1890, vol. 3 in 1895, and vol. 4 in 1900. 



RICHARD ASSHETON, M.A., F.L.S., F.G.S. 

On the Development of the Optic Nerve of Vertebrates, and the Choroidal Fissure of 

Embryonic Life. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 34. 1892. 
A Reinvestigation into the Early Stages of the Development of the Rabbit. Quart. 

Journ. Microsc. Science, 37. 1894. 
On the Phenomenon of the Fusion of the Epiblastic Layers in the Rabbit and in the Frog. 

Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 37. 1894. 
On the Causes which lead to the Attachment of the Mammalian Embryo to the Walls 

of the Uterus. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 37. 1894. 
The Primitive Streak of the Rabbit ; the Causes which may determine its Shape, 

and the part of the Embryo formed by its Activity. Quart. Journ. Microsc. 

Science, 37. 1894. 
On the Growth in Length of the Frog Embryo. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 

37. 1894. 
(See also ARTHUR ROBINSON, under ANATOMY, p. 217.) 

JOHN BEARD, D.Sc. 

The system of Branchial Sense Organs and their associated Ganglia in Ichthyopsida. 
Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 26. 1885. 

E. J. BLES, B.Sc. (see A. M. MARSHALL). 

HERBERT BOLTON, F.R.S.E. 

Notes on Boulders at Darley Dale, Matlock, Derbyshire. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1891. 
On the Occurrence of Marine Shells in the Boulder Clay of Rossendale. Manch. 

Geol. Soc. Trans., 21. 1892. 
A Sketch of the Geological Features of Rossendale. Soc. Municipal Engineers Proc. 

1892. 
A Catalogue of the Types and Figured Specimens of the Geological Department of 

the Manchester Museum. Museums Association Report, 1893, and separately, 

in Manchester Museum Handbooks. 
On the Occurrence of a Trilobite in the Skiddaw Slate of the Isle of Man. Geol. 

Mag. 1893. 

The Skiddaw Slates of the North of the Isle of Man. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1893. 
Note upon Plant and Fish Remains from Jarrow Colliery, Co. Kilkenny, Ireland. 

Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 22. 1894. 

Note upon Myriolepis Hibernica. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 22. 1894. 
Supplementary List of Types and Figured Specimens in the Geological Department, 

Manchester Museum. Museums Association Report. 1894. 
The Metamorphism of Coal. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 23. 1894-5. 
On the Arrangement of a Geological Museum. Museums Association Report. 1895. 
On the Geology of North-East Lancashire in its relation to the Physical Geography. 

Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 24. 1895-6. 

FF 



( 206 ) 

HERBERT BOLTON, F.R.S.E. continued. 

Animal Life of the Lancashire Coal Measures. Manch. Microsc. Soc, Trans. 1896. 
On the Occurrence of the Genus Listracanthus in the English Coal Measures. Geol. 

Mag. 1896. 
Descriptions of new species of Mollusca from the Millstone Grit and Lower Coal 

Measures of Lancashire. Manchester Memoirs, 41. 1896. 
The Provincial Museum. Natural Science. 1897. 
The Nomenclature of the Coal Seams of the Lancashire Lower Coal Measures. Manch. 

Geol. Soc. Trans., 25, 1898, and separately in Manchester Museum Handbooks. 
The Palaeontology of the Slates of the Isle of Man. Manchester Memoirs. 1899. 
Provincial Museums and the Museums Association. Museums Association Report. 1898. 
(See also W. E. HOYLE.) 

H. C. CHADWICK. 

On an Abnormal Specimen of Antedon rosaceus. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. [6], 12. 1893. 

OTTO VERNON DARBISHIRE, B.A., Ph.D. 

Chantransia endozo'ica Darbish., eine neue Florideen-Art. Berichte d. deutsch. Botan. 

Gesellschaft, 17. 1899. 

On Actinococcus and Phyllophora. Annals of Botany, 13. 1899. 
Uber die Apothecienentwickelung der Flechte Physcia pulverulenta (Schreb.) Nyl. (Erste 

Mittheilung). Jahrbiicher fur wissenschaftliche Botanik, 34. 1899. 

Professor W. BOYD DAWKINS, M.A., F.R.S. 

Early Man in Britain. 8vo, Macmillan. 1889. 

Pleistocene Mammalia. Pataontographical Soc. 410, 1866-1887. 

Exploration of the Victoria Cave. Brit* Assoc. Report. 1870, 1873. 

On the Discovery of the Glutton in Britain. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 27. 1871. 

On the Cervidoe of the Forest Bed of Norfolk and Suffolk. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc. 

28. 1872. 
On the Classification of the Pleistocene Strata of Britain and of the Continent by 

means of the Mammalia. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 28. 1873. 

On the Mammalia found at Windy Knoll. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 31, 1875 ; 33, 1877. 
On the Caves of Creswell Crags. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 32, 1876 ; 33, 1877 ; 35, 

1879. 
Contributions to the History of the European Meiocene and Pleiocene Strata. Quart. 

Journ. Geol. Soc., 34. 1878. 

Range of Mummoth in Space and Time. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 35. 1879. 
The Classification of the Tertiary Period by means of the Mammalia. Quart. Journ. . 

Geol. Soc., 36. 1880. 

Ovibos moschatus. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 39, 1883; 41, 1885. 
Ailurus anglicus. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., 44. 1888. 

The Search for Coal in the South of England. Roy. Institut. Proc., 13. 1890. 
On the South Eastern Coal Field at Dover. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 22. 1894. 
The Probable Range of the Coal Measures in Southern England. Trans. Feder. Inst. 

Mining Engineers. 1894. 



( 207 ) 

Professor W. BOYD DAWKINS, M.A., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Geology of the Isle of Man. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 22, 1894; 23, 1896. 
On the Relation of Geology to Civil Engineering. Proc. Inst. Civ. Eng., 124. 1898. 
And other papers. 

A. BENDY, D.Sc. 

On the Regeneration of the Visceral Mass in Antedon rosaceus. Studies from the 
Biological Laboratories of Owens College, 1. 1886. 

G. HERBERT FOWLER, B.A., Ph.D. 

The Anatomy of the Madreporaria, I. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 25. 1885. 
The Anatomy of the Madreporaria, II. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 27. 1886. 
The Anatomy of the Madreporaria, III. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 28. 1887. 
(See also A. M. MARSHALL.) 

F. W. GAMBLE, D.Sc. 

Observations on two rare British Nudibranchs. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. [6], 9. 1892. 
Contributions to a knowledge of British Marine Turbellaria. Quart. Journ. Microsc. 

Science, 34. 1893. 
The Turbellaria of Plymouth Sound and its neighbourhood. Journ. Marine Biol. 

Assoc. [2], 3. 1893. 

Report on the Turbellaria. Proc. Liverpool Biol. Soc., 7. 1893. 
Articles on Platyhelminthes and Mesozoa. The Cambridge Natural History, 2. 

Macmillan and Co. 1896. 

Article on Vaughan Thompson. Dictionary of National Biography. 1898. 
Practical Zoology. By MARSHALL and HURST. 5th edition, edited by F. W. GAMBLE. 

Smith, Elder, and Co. 1898. 

F. W. GAMBLE, D.Sc., and J. H. ASHWORTH, D.Sc. 

The Habits and Structure of Arenicola marina. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 41. 

1898. 
The Anatomy and Classification of the Arenicolidae. Quart. Journ. Micrcsc. Science, 43. 

1900. 

F. W. GAMBLE, D.Sc., and F. W. KEEBLE, M.A. 

The Colour-Physiology of Hippolyte varians. Proc. Roy. Soc., 65. 1899. 

Hippolyte varians: a Study in Colour-change, Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 43. 1900. 

WALTER GARSTANG, M.A., F.Z.S. 

Report on the Tunicata of Plymouth. Journ. Marine Biol. Assoc., 2. 1891. 

Note on a New and Primitive Type of Compound Ascidian. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 

[6], 8. 1891. 

On some Ascidians from the Isle of Wight. Journ. Marine Biol. Assoc., 2. 1891. 
An Attempt to elucidate the real Structure and Relations of Moss's Polystigmatic 

Appendicularian. Trans. Biol. Soc. Liverpool, 6. 1892. 
On the Development of the Stigmata in Ascidians. Proc. Roy. Soc., 51. 1892. 



( 208 ) 

A. E. GILES, B.Sc., M.D., Ch.B. 

Development of the Fat bodies in the Frog ; a contribution to the History of the 
Pronephros. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 29. 1888. 

J. RAY HARDY and R. STANDEN. 

The Land and Freshwater Mollusca of Oban and the Island of Lismore. Journ. of 

Conch., 7. 1893. 
The Coleoptera of Rathlin Island, Co. Antrim Ireland. Irish Naturalist, 6. 1897. 

MARCUS M. HARTOG, M.A., D.Sc., F.L.S. 

On the Investigation of Floral Development. Journ. Quekett Micr. Club. 1878. 

On the Nervous System of Cyclops. Afanch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 18. 1878. 

On the Organ of Bojanus. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 13. 1879. 

On Sapotaceae, II. Brit. Assoc. Report, 1879; ar "d Journ. of Bot., December, 1879. 

Notes on Cyclops. Brit. Assoc. Report (abstract). 1879. 

On the Mode in which Hydra swallows its Prey. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

19. 1879; and Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 20. 1880. 
On some undescribed Hairs in the Copepoda. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

19. 1879. 

On a New Form of Acinetan. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 19. 1879. 
On the Anal Respiration of the Copepoda. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 19. 

1879. 

On the Respiration of the Crustacea. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 20. 1880. 
De 1'CEil Impair des Crustaces. Comptes Rendus, and Arch, de Zool. Exp. 1882, 

and Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. [5], 10. 1882. 
On the Morphology of Cyclops, etc. Trans. Linn. Soc. (Zool.), 5. 1884 ; abstracted 

in Journ. Linn. Soc. (Zool.), 18. 1884. 
(See also W. C. WILLIAMSON.) 

T. HICK, B.A., B.Sc. (') 

Structure and Affinities of Lepidodendron. Proc. Yorks. Geol. Soc. 1889. 

On a New Fossil Plant from the Lower Coal Measures. Journ. Linn. Soc. (Bot.), 29. 

1891. 

The Fruit Spike of Calamites. Natural Science. 1893. 
Calamostachys Binneyana. Proc. Yorks. Geol. Soc. 1894. 

On the Primary Structure of the Stem of Calamites. Manchester Memoirs [4], 8. 1893. 
Kaloxylon Hookeri and Lygonodendron Oldhamium. Manchester Memoirs [4], 9. 1894. 
On the Structure of the Leaves of Calamites. Manchester Memoirs [4], 9. 1895. 
On a Sporangiferous Spike from the Middle Coal Measures. Manchester Memoirs [4], 

10. 1895. 
On Rachiopteris cylindrica. Manchester Memoirs, 41. 1896. 

(') List kindly supplied by Professor WEISS. 



T. HICK, B.A., B.Sc., in conjunction with JAMES LOMAX. 

On a New Sporiferous Spike from the Lancashire Coal Measures. Manchester Memoirs 
[4], 8. 1893. 

Professor SYDNEY J. HICKSON, M.A., D.Sc., F.R.S. 

The Story of Life in the Seas. Newnes. 1897. 

On the Ampullae in some Specimens of Millepora in the Manchester Museum. Man- 
chester Memoirs, 41. 1896. 

The Classification of Alcyonaria. C. R. des Seances du J"'. Congr. Internat. de Zoologie. 
1896. 

On the Species of Millepora. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1898. 

Notes on a Collection of Specimens of Millepora. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1898. 

Crab Gall in Millepora. Bull. Liverp. Mus., 1. 1898. 

Report on Genus Millepora. A. Willey's Zoological Results, 2. Cambridge University 
Press. 1899. 

The Medusae of Millepora. Proc. Roy. Soc., 66. 1899. 

ISA LOCKYER HILES, M.Sc. 

The Gorgonacea collected by Dr. WILLEY. A. Willey's Zoological Results, 2. Cam- 
bridge University Press. 1899. 

The Gorgonacean Corals collected by Mr. J. STANLEY GARDINER' at Funafuti. Proc. 
Zool. Soc. 1899. 

BERNARD HOBSON, M.Sc., F.R.G.S. 

On the Igneous Rocks of the South of the Isle of Man. Quart. Journ. Geol. .W., 
47. 1891. Reprinted with additions in Yn Lioar Manninagh, 1. 1892. 

On the Basalts and Andesites of Devonshire known as Felspathic Traps. Quart, /mint. 
Geol. Soc., 48. 1892. 

An Irish Augitite. Geol. Mag. 1892. 

W. E. HOYLE, M.A., M.Sc., F.R.S.E. 

A Catalogue of Recent Cephalopoda. Supplement, 1886-96. Proc. Royal Phys. Soc. 

Edin., 12. 1897. 

Note on a British Cephalopod (Illex eblance). Journ. Marine Biological Assoc., 2. 1891. 
A Revised List of British Echinoidea. Proc. Roy. Phys. Soc. Edin., 10. 1891. 
The Registration and Cataloguing of Museum Specimens. Museums Association Report. 

1891. 

On the Luminous Organs of Cephalopoda. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1893. 
Description of a case of Foraminifera in the Manchester Museum. Museums Association 

Report, pp. 152-166. 1894. 
The Dewey Decimal Classification and the International Catalogue of Science. Natural 

Science, 9. 1896. 

W. E. HOYLE, M.A., and HERBERT BOLTON, F.R.S.E. 

Classified Cataloguing as applied to Palaeozoic Fossils. Museums Association Report. 
1894- 



CHARLES HERBERT HURST, Ph.D. 

Appearance as an Aid to Protection. Trans. Manch. Microsc. Soc. 1890. 

The Life History and Development of a Gnat. Trans. Manch. Microsc. Soc. 1890. 

The Pupal Stage of Culex. Studies from the Biological Laboratories of the Owens 

College, \. 1890. 

The Post Embryonic Development of Culex. Proc. Liverpool Biol. Soc., 4. 1 890. 
Heredity and Variation. Trans. Manch. Microsc. Soc. 1891. 
The Nature of Heredity. Natural Science. 1892. 
The Evolution of Heredity. Natural Science. 1892. 
The Recapitulation Theory (2 papers). Natural Science. 1893. 
Supposed Auditory Organs. Natural Science. 1893. 

Suggestions as to the True Functions of Tentaculocysts, etc. Natural Science. 1893. 
The Phylogeny of Lucernarians. Natural Science. 1893. 
The Digits in a Bird's Wing. Natural Science. 1893. 
Obituary of ARTHUR M. MARSHALL. Natural Science. 1894. 
The Structure and Habits of Archseopteryx (3 papers). Natural Science. 1895. 
The Crystalline Lens. Natural Science. 1895. 
A New Theory of Hearing. Proc. Liverpool Biol. Soc., 9. 1894. 
The Spectrum Top. Nature, 51. 1895. 
(See also A. M. MARSHALL.) 

Professor VV. STANLEY JEVONS, M.A., LL.D., F.R.S. (see PHILOSOPHY, etc., pp. 165-7). 
F. W. KEEBLE, M.A. (see F. W. GAMBLE). 

OSWALD H. LATTER, M.A. 

Notes on Anodon and Unio. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891. 

Professor A. M. MARSHALL, M.A., M.D., D.Sc., F.R.S. 

The Frog. J. E. Cornish and David Nutt. ist edition, 1882. yth edition, 1900. 

Vertebrate Embryology. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1893. 

Biological Lectures and Addresses, edited by C. F. Marshall. D. Nutt, 1894. 

Lectures on the Darwinian Theory, edited by C. F. Marshall. D. Nutt, 1894. 

On the Head Cavities and Associated Nerves in Elasmobranchs. Quart. Journ. 

Microsc. Science, 21. 1881. 

The Segmental Value of the Cranial Nerves. Journ. of Anal, and Phys., 16. 1882. 
Abnormal conditions of Reproductive Organs in the Frog. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 18. 

1884. 

On the Nervous System ot'Antedon rosaceus. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 24. 1884. 
The Morphology of the Sexual Organs of Hydra. Manchester Memoirs [3], 9. 1885. 
Address to the Biological Section of the British Association. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1890. 

Professor A. M. MARSHALL and E. J. BLES, B.Sc. 

The Development of the Kidneys and Fat-bodies in the Frog. Studies from the Biological 

Laboratories of the Owens College, 2. 1890. 
The Development of the Blood-Vessels in the Frog. Studies from the Biological 

Laboratories of the Owens College, 2. 1890. 



Professor A. M. MARSHALL and G. HERBERT FOWLER, B.A., Ph. D. 

Report on the Pennatulida dredged by H.M.S. Porcupine. Trans. Roy. Soc. Edin., 23. 

1888. 
Report on the Pennatulida of the Mergui Archipelago. Journ. Linn. Soc. (Zoo/.), 21. 

1889. 

Professor A. M. MARSHALL and CHARLES HERBERT HURST, Ph.D. 

Practical Zoology. Smith, Elder, and Co. ist edition, 1887. 5th edition, 1898 (see 
F. W. GAMBLE). 

Professor A. M. MARSHALL and Professor W. BALDWIN SPENCER, M.A., F.R.S. 

Observations on the Cranial Nerves of Scyllium. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 21. 1881. 

C. F. MARSHALL, M.D., B.Sc., F.R.C.S. 

Investigations on the Physiology of the Nervous System of the Lobster. Studies from the 

Biological Laboratories of the Owens College, 1. 1886. 
Observations on the Structure and Distribution of Striped and Unstriped Muscle in the 

Animal Kingdom. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 28. 1887. 
Further Observations on the Histology of Striped Muscle. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science. 

31. 1890. 

B. MELLAND, M.B., M.Sc. 

A Simplified View of the Histology of the Striped Muscle-fibre. Quart. Journ. Microsc. 
Science, 25. 1885. 

JAMES COSMO MELVILL, M.A., F.L.S. 

Description of a New Species of Engina from the Loyalty Islands. Proc. Malac. Soc. 

Lond., 1. 1894. 
Upon the Principles of Nomenclature, and their Application to the Genera of Recent 

Mollusca. Journ. of Conch., 8. 1897. 
On Latirus armatus, etc. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1898. 

J. COSMO MELVILL, M.A., F.L.S. , and ROBERT STANDEN. 

Notes on a Collection of Shells from Lifu and Uvea, Loyalty Isles, formed by the Rev. 

James and Mrs. Hadfield, with list of species. Parts I. -III. Journ. of Conch., 8. 

I895-7- 
The Marine Mollusca of Madras and the immediate neighbourhood. Journ. of Conch., 9. 

1898. 
Notes on a Collection of Marine Shells from Lively Island, Falklands, with list of species. 

Journ. of Conch., 9. 1898. 

fferviera, a New Genus of Pyramidellidae. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
Notes on the Caput serpentis group of the Genus Cyprcea. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
Description of Conus dytospira sp. n. from the Arabian Sea. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. 

[7], 4. 1899. 
Report on the Marine Mollusca obtained during the first expedition of Prof. A. C. 

HADDON to the Torres Straits in 1888-89. Journ. Linn. Sot. (Zoo/.), 27. 1899. 



2I2 

J. COSMO MELVILL, M.A., F.L.S., and ROBERT STANDEN continued. 

Report on the Mollusca of the " Jackson-Harmsworth " Expedition to Franz Josef 
Land (1896-97), and of the "Andrew-Coats" Cruise (1898) to Kolguer, etc. 
Manchester Memoirs, 44. 1 900. 

HENRY BARGMAN POLLARD, B.A., D.Sc., F.Z.S. 

The Cirrhostomial Origin of the Head in Vertebrates. Anatomischer Anzeiger, 9. 1894. 

The Suspension of the Jaws in Fish. Anatomischer Anzeiger, 10. 1895. 

The Oral Cirri of Siluroids, and the Origin of the Head in Vertebrates. Zoologische 

Jalirbucher. 1 894. 
On Wax Models of Siluroid Fishes. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1 894. 

EDITH M. PRATT, M.Sc. 

Contributions to our knowledge of the Marine Fauna of the Falkland Islands. Manchester 

Memoirs, 42. 1898. 
The Entomostraca of Lake Bassenthwaite. Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. [7], 2. 1898. 

W. BALDWIN SPENCER, M.A., F.R.S. (see A. M. MARSHALL). 

ROBERT STANDEN. 

Note on Vertigo substriata var. albina. Journ. of Conch., 8. 1895. 

Helix aspersa, m. sinistrorsum. Journ. of Conch., 8. 1895. 

Note on Cyprcea tesselata, Swn. Journ. of Conch., 8. 1895. 

Notes on a Conchological Excursion to the West of Ireland. Journ of Conch., 8. 1895. 

Report on the Mollusca of Galway and Aran Isles : Irish Field Club Union Excursion . 

Irish Naturalist, 4. 1895. 

Carrion Crow in Co. Antrim, Ireland. Irish Naturalist, 5. 1896. 

The Land Mollusca of Ballycastle and District, Co. Antrim. Irish Naturalist, 6. 1897. 
On the Fauna of Rathlin Island and Ballycastle District, Co. Antrim. Irish Naturalist, 6- 

1897. 

Bog Bursts. Irish Naturalist, 6. 1897. 
Report on the Mollusca of the Kenmare District, Co. Kerry : Irish Field Club Union 

Excursion. Irish Naturalist, 7. 1898. 

Helix nemoralis m. sinistrorsum in Lancashire. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1898. 
Notes on the Land Mollusca of Grange-over-Sands, Lancashire. Journ. of Conch., 9. 

1898. 

Note on Terebra eximia, Dh. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1898. 
Vertigo pusilla in Lancashire and Westmorland. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
Remarks on the Cause of Abnormality in Planorbis spirorbis. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
Vertigo moulinsiana, Dupuy, in Cambridgeshire. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
Vertigo alpestris, Alder, in Lancashire. Journ. of Conch., 9. 1899. 
(See also J. RAY HARUY, J. COSMO MELVILL, and below.) 

ROBKRT STANDEN in conjunction with EDWARD COLLIER. 

Further Conchological Notes from the West of Ireland. Journ. of Conch., 8. 1896. 



FRANCIS VILLV, B.A., M.B. 

The Development of the Ear and Accessory Organs in the Common Frog. Quart, Journ. 

Microsc. Science, 9. 1890. 
(See also PATHOLOGY, p. 228.) 

H. MARSHALL WARD, Sc.D., F.R.S., F.L.S. 

Researches on the Life History of Hemileia vastatrix. Journ. Linn. Soc. (Hot.), 19. 1882. 
Morphology and Life History of a Tropical Pyrenomycete. Quart. Journ. Microsc. 

Science, 22. 1882. 

Observations on Saprolegnise. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 23. 1883. 
Observations on the Genus Pythium. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 23. 1883. 
On the Sexuality of the Fungi. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 24. 1884. 
An Aquatic Myxomycete. Studies from Biological Laboratories of Owens College, \. 1886. 
A Tropical Epiphyllous Lichen. Trans. Linn. Soc. (Sot.) [2], 2. 1883. 
Perithecium of Meliola. Phil. Trans. 1883. 

Professor F. E. WEISS, B.Sc., F.L.S. 

On a Supposed Case of Symbiosis in Tetraplodon. British Assoc. Report. 1895. 
Fermentation and the Respiration of Vegetable Organisms. Journ. of the Federated 

Institute of Brewing, 3. 1897. 
Life : Presidential Address to the Manchester Microscopical Society. Trans. Manch. 

Microsc. Soc. 1898. 

Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. (') 

On the Recent Foraminifera of Great Britain. Ray Soc. 1858. 

On Volvox globator. Manchester Memoirs \z\ 9. 1851. 

On the Structure and Affinities of the Plants hitherto known as Stern bergiae. Manchester 

Memoirs [2], 9. 1851. 

On the Minute Structure of a Species of Fanjasina. Microsc. Soc. Trans. 1851. 
On the Study of Natural History. Introductory Lecture at Owens College. 1851. 
Further Elucidations of the Structure of Volvox globator. Microsc. Soc. Trans. 1852. 
On the Anatomy of Melicerta ringens. Journ. Microsc. Science, 1. 1853. 
On the Use of Chloroform in Infantile Convulsions. Lancet, 1. 1853. Brit. Med. Journ. 

1857- 
On the Restoration of Zamia gigas to the Lower Sandstone and Shale of the Yorkshire 

Coast. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1854. 
On the Scaly Vegetable Heads or Collars from Runswick Bay, supposed to belong to 

Zamia gigas. Yorks. Phil. Soc. Proc. 1855. 

On the Functions of the Chorda tympani. Assoc. Med. Journ. 1855. 
On the Histology of Dental and Allied Dermal Tissues of Vertebrate and Invertebrate 

Animals. Parts I., II. Brit. Journ. of Dental Science. 1856-57. 
Enlargement of the Tonsil and Uvula in relation to Deafness. Brit. Med. Journ. 1857. 

(') List mainly derived from Kemiitisceitces of a Yorkshire Naturalist by W. C. WILLIAMSON ; edited by 
his Wife. G. Redway. 1896. 

GG 



Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On some Histological Features in the Shells of the Crustacea. Journ. Microsc. Science. 

1860, 

On the Anatomy and Physiology of the Foraminifera. Pop. Science Review. 1865. 
On a Cheirotherian Footprint from the base of the Keuper Sandstone of Daresbury, 

Cheshire. Geol. Soc. Proc. 1866. 
On an Undescribed Type of Calamodendron from the Upper Coal Measures of Lancashire. 

Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 8. 1868. 

Additional Notes on the Structure of Calamites. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Sac. Proc., 8. 1869. 
On the Structure and Affinities of some Exogenous Stems from the Coal Measures. 

Monthly Microsc. Journ., 2. 1869. 
What is Bathybius ? Pop. Science Review, 8. 1869. 
Contributions towards the History of Zamia gigas, Lindley and Hutton. Linn. Sac. Trans. 

(Bot.\ 26. 1870. 

On the Organisation of the Stems of Calamites. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1870. 
On a New Form of Calamitean Strobilus. Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 1871. 
On the Structure of the Gizzards and Teeth of Rotifera. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. 

Proc., 8. 1869. 

On the Sphcerosira volvox, Ehrenb. Pop. Science Review, 9. 1870. 
On the Structure of the Dictyoxylons of the Coal Measures. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1871. 
On the Classification of the Vascular Cryptogamia, as affected by Recent Discoveries 

amongst the Fossil Plants of the Coal Measures. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1871. 
On the Structure of the Woody Zone of an Undescribed Form of Calamite (? Calamopitus}. 

Manchester Memoirs [3], 4. 1868. 
On the Organisation of an Undescribed Verticillate Strobilus from the Lower Coal 

Measures of Lancashire. Manch. Lit. and Phii. Soc. Proc., 10. 1871. 
On the Structure of some Specimens of Stigmaria. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 

10. 1871. 

Exogenous Structures among the Stems of the Coal Measures. Nature, 4. 1871. 
On the Organisation of the Fossil Plants of the Coal Measures. Parts I.-XIX. Phil. 

Trans. 1871-93. 

On Coal and Coal Plants. Macmillarfs Mag. 1873. 

On the Structure of Stigmaria. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 14. 1875. 
Primeval Vegetation in its Relation to the Doctrines of Natural Selection and Evolution. 

Essays and Addresses by Professors and Lecturers of the Owens College. 

Macmillan and Co. 1874. 
La Vegetation Primitive dans ses Rapports avec la Selection Naturelle et la The"orie de 

1'Evolution. Revue Scientifiijue, 8. 1875. 
On some Fossil Seeds from the Lower Carboniferous Beds of Lancashire. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1875. 
Corrections of the Nomenclature of the Objects figured in a Memoir " On some of the 

Minute Objects found in the Mud of the Levant." Manchester Memoirs [2], 5. 

1872. 
Recent Researches into the Organisation of some of the Plants of the Coal Measures. 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1876. 



Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On some Physiological and Morphological Features seen in the Plants of the Coal 

Measures. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1876. 

Reminiscences of a Yorkshire Naturalist (3 papers). Good Words. 1877. 
The Microscopic Conditions of a Slab from the Mountain Limestone of Holland. 

Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Prof., 17. 1878. 
On the Supposed Radiolarians and Diatoms of the Carboniferous Rocks. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1878. 

On the Botanical Affinities of the Carboniferous Sigillarias. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1879. 
Sphenophyllum, Asterophyllites und Calamites, deren Stellung zu einander nach den letzten 

Beobachtungen. Neuesjahrb. Mineral. 1879. 

Preliminary Remarks on the Microscopic Structure of Coal. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1881. 
The Evolution of the Palaeozoic Vegetation. Nature, 24. 1881. 
Helophyton Williamsoni. Nature, 25. 1882. 

On the Morphology of the Pitcher of Cephalotus follicularis. Nature, 28. 1883. 
The Present State of our Knowledge of the Vegetation of the Carboniferous Age. 

Presidential Address to the Geological Section of the British Association at 

Southport. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1883. 
On some Anomalous Oolitic and Palaeozoic Forms of Vegetation. Roy. Institut. Proc., 

10. 1884. 

On Pyrrhonism in Science. Contemporary Review. 1881. 
On some Undescribed Tracks of Invertebrate Animals from the Carboniferous Rocks ; 

and on some Inorganic Phenomena simulating Plant Remains produced on Tidal 

Shores. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 24. 1885. Manchester Memoirs [3], 10. 

1887. 

Address at Owens College. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 18. 1885. 
On Heterangium tiliceoides and Kaloxylon Hookeri. Roy. Soc. Proc., 42. 1887. 
Note on Lepidodendron Harcourtii and Lepidodendron fuliginosum. Roy. Soc. Proc., 42. 

1887. 

On the Morphology of Pinites oblongus. Manchester Memoirs [3], 10. 1887. 
On the True Fructification of Carboniferous Calamites. Roy. Soc. Proc., 42. 1887. 
On the Relation of Calamodendron to Calamites. Manchester Memoirs [3], 10. 1887. 
Preliminary Report of the Committee, consisting of W. C. WILLIAMSON and Mr. WM. 

CASH, F.G.S., on the Flora of the Halifax Hard Bed. Report of the Committee. 

Brit. Assoc. Reports. 1886 and 1887. 
Monograph on the Morphology and Histology of Stigmaria ficoides. Palceontographical 

Soc. 1887. 

On the Fossil Trees of the Coal Measures. Manch. Geol. Soc. Trans., 19. 1888. 
On some Anomalous Cells developed within the Interior of the Vascular and Cellular 

Tissues of the Fossil Plants of the Coal Measures. Annals of Botany. 1888. 
On Goethe as Botanist and Osteologist. Publications of the English Goethe Soc., 5. 

1889. 
General . . . Index to the Author's Collective Memoirs on the Fossil Plants of the Coal 

Measures. Introduction and Parts I.-III. Manchester Memoirs [4], 4, V, and 8. 

1890-93. 



( 216 ) 

Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. continued. 

On our Present Knowledge of the Vegetation of the Carboniferous Age and the Further 
Advancement of the Study of the Subject. Manch. Geol. Sac. Trans., 21. 
1891. 

Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, F.R.S., etc., and MARCUS M. HARTOG, M.A., D.Sc. 

Les Sigillaires et les Lepidodendre'es. Annales des Sciences Naturelles (Botanigue), 13. 
1882. 



XII. ANATOMY ('). 

N. H. ALCOCK, M.A., M.D. 

On the Vascular System of the Cheiroptera. Part I. : Thoracic Vessels of Pteropus 
medius. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1898. 

J. MACDONALD BROWN, M.B., F.R.C.S., F.R.S.E. 

Variations in Myology. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 
Peculiar Malformation of both Feet. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 
The Femoral Artery in Apes. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 
Abnormalities of the Thoracic Duct. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 16. 1882. 

ALBERT J. CHALMERS, M.D. 

On the Development of the Liver and Septum Transversum. Dissertation for M.D. 
Degree (Victoria). Awarded Gold Medal. 1893. 

ALEXANDER FRASER, M.B., C.M., F.R.C.S.T. 

On the Development of the Ossicula Auditus in the Higher Mammalia. Phil. Trans. 

1882. 
On the Inversion of the Blastodermic Layers in the Rat and Mouse. Proc. Roy. Soc., 

34. 1883. 

A. M. PATERSON, M.D., M.R.C.S. 

Notes on Abnormalities, with special reference to the Vertebral Arteries. Journ. of 

Anat. and Phys., 18. 1884. 
The Spinal Nervous System of the Mammalia. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Edinburgh). 

Awarded Gold Medal. 1886. 

On some Monstrosities of a Dorking Fowl. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 21. 1887. 
The Fate of the Muscle-Plate and the Development of the Spinal Nerves and Limb 

Plexuses in Birds and Mammals. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 28. 1887. 

(') Vol. 1 of Studies in Anatomy from the Anatomical Department of the Owens College was published 
in 1891 (J. E. Cornish). Vol. 2 is in the Press. 



( "7 ) 

A. M. PATERSON, M.D., M.R.C.S. continued. 

On the Morphology and Physiology of the Limb Plexuses. Brit. Assoc. Report. 

1887. 

The Morphology of the Sacral Plexus in Man. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 21. 1887. 
On Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia. Brit. Med. Journ. 1888. 
The Position of the Mammalian Limb regarded in the light of its Innervation and 

Development. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 23. 1889. 

J. BESWICK PERRIN. 

On the Myology of Opisthocomus cristatus. Trans. Zoo!. Soc. 1873. 

ARTHUR ROBINSON, M.D., M.R.C.S. 

On the Nervous Lesions produced by Lead Poisoning. Brain. 1885. 

On the Position and Peritoneal Relations of the Mammalian Ovary. Journ. of Anat. 

and Phys., 21. 1887. 
Observations on the Earlier Stages of the Development of the Lungs of Rats and 

Mice. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 23. 1889. 
Observations on the Development of Two Rodents. Dissertation for M.D. Degree 

(Edinburgh). Awarded Gold Medal. 1890. 
Some Points in the Development of Mus musculus and Mus decumanus ; the relation 

* of the Yolk Sac to the Decidua and Placenta. Brit. Assoc. Report. 1891. 
Observations on the Development of the Spinal Cord in Mus musculus and Mus 

decumanus; the Formation of the Septa and Fissures. Brit. Assoc. Report 

1891. 
The Development of the Posterior Columns, the Posterior Fissure, and of the Central 

Canal of the Spinal Cord. Studies in Anatomy from the Owens College, 1. 1891. 
Abnormalities of the Venous System and their Relation to the Development of the 

Veins. Studies in Anatomy from the Owens College, 1. 1891. 

On the Nutritive Importance of the Yolk Sac. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 26. 1892. 
Observations upon the Segmentation Cavity, the Archenteron, and the Germinal 

Layers in Mammals. Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science.' 1892. 
Observations upon the Posterior Cranial and Anterior Cervical Nerves of Mammals. 

Brit. Assoc. Report. 1892. 
Observations on an Early Stage of Development of the Ferret. Anatomischer Anzeiger. 

1893. 
Formation and Structure of the Optic Nerve and its Relations to the Nerve Stalk. Journ. 

of Anat. and Phys., 30. 1896. 
(See also Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, and below.) 

ARTHUR ROBINSON, M.D., and RICHARD ASSHETON, M.A., F.L.S. 

On the Formation and Fate of the Primitive Streak. Quart. Journ. of Microsc. Science, 
32. 1891. 



( "8 ) 

J. W. SMITH, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

On the Anatomy of Spheniscus demersus. Studies in Anatomy from the Owens 

. College, 1. 1891. 

On some Muscular Anomalies in Human Anatomy. Studies in Anatomy from the 
Owens College, 1. 1891. 

PETER THOMPSON, M.D. 

Polypus of the Pylorus with intussusception. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 31. 1897. 
On the Levator Ani or ischio-anal muscle of Ungulates, with special reference to its 

Morphology. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 33. 1899. 
The Myology of the Pelvic Floor, a Contribution to Human and Comparative Anatomy. 

Dissertation for M.D. Degree ( Victoria). Awarded Gold Medal. McCorquodale 

and Co. Ld., Newton. 1899. 

Professor MORISON WATSON, M.D., F.R.S. 

Notes on a remarkable case of Pharyngeal Diverticulum. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 9. 

1874. 

Case of Double Aortic Arch. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 
The Female Organs of Hycena crocuta. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1877. 
The Male Organs of Hycena crocuta. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878. 
The Anatomy of Chlamydophorus truncatus. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878. 
The Homology of the Sexual Organs. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1879. 
On the Curvatores Coccygis Muscles of Man. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1 880. 
The Anatomy of the Female Organs in Proboscidea. Trans. Zool. Soc. 1881. 
The Female Organs and Placentation of the Racoon (Procyon lotor). Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 32. 1 88 1. 
On the Anatomy of the Spheniscidae. Report on the Scientific Results of the Voyages 

of H.M.S. Challenger. 1883. 

Professor MORISON WATSON, M.D., F.R.S., and Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

On the Anatomy of the Elk. Journ. Linn. Soc. (Zoology). 1877. 
The Anatomy of Hycena crocuta. Proc. Zool. Soc. 1879. 

The Anatomy of the Northern Beluga (Delphinapterus leucas). Trans. Roy. Soc. 
Edin. 1879. 

Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

Abnormal Branches of the Femoral Artery, Absence of Profunda Femoris. Journ. of 

Anat. and Phys., 13. 1879. 
On the Male 'Organs of the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). Journ. of Anat. and 

Phys., 13. 1879. 

The Intrinsic Muscles of the Marsupial Hand. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 
Myology of Viverra civetta. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 
On the Anatomy of the Indian Elephant. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 
The Anatomy of the Koala. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 



( "9 ) 

Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S. continued. 

On the so-called Movements of Pronation and Supination in the Hind Limb of certain 

Marsupials. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 

The Muscular Anatomy of the Koala. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 16. 1882. 
Note on the Sphincter Vaginas Muscle. Med. Chron. (Proc. North of Eng. Obstet. 

and Gynctcol. Soc.). 1890. 
On some Recent Observations on the Development and Structure of the Placenta. 

Med. Chron. 1891. 
On the Termination of the Mammalian Aorta, with observations on the Homologies of 

the Pelvic Arteries. Studies in Anatomy from the Owens College, 1. 1891. 
On the Development and Structure of the Placenta. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. Med. 

Chron. 1895-6. 
Abnormalities of the Middle Sacral Artery and their Morphological Significance. 

Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 31. 1897. 
(See also MORISON WATSON, and below.) 

Professor ALFRED H. YOUNG, M.B., F.R.C.S., and ARTHUR ROBINSON, M.D., M.R.C.S. 

On the Anatomy of Jfycena striata. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 23. 1888-9. 

The Development and Morphology of the Vascular System in Mammals. Proc. Roy. 

Soc., 62. 1898. 
General Embryology. The Descriptive Anatomy of the Vascular System. In the Press. 



XIII. PHYSIOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY('). 

ERNST BLANKENHORN, Ph.D. (see ARTHUR GAMGEE). 

H. A. G. BROOKE, B.A., M.B. (see MEDICINE, p. 229, and below). 

H. A. G. BROOKE, B.A., M.B., and E. O. HOPWOOD, B.A., M.D. 

On the Changes in Circulation which are induced when the Blood is expelled from 
the Limbs by Esmarch's Method. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 

G. H. COOKE, M.D., M.R.C.S. 

The Action of Various Stimuli on Non-Striped Muscle. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 24. 
1890. 

J. S. EDKINS, M.A., M.B. 

Action of Rennet Extracts on Casein. Brit. Med. Journ. 1891. 

A Fat-absorption Apparatus. Studies from the Physiological Laboratories of the Owens 

College. 1891. 
The Absorption of Water in the Alimentary Canal. Journ. of Phys. 1892. 

(') In 1877 Dr. GAMGEE published a volume of Studies from the Physiological Laboratories of the Owens 
College. A second volume was published for the College Council in 1891 (_/. E. Cornish). 



( 220 ) 

Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE, M.D., F.R.S., F.R.C.P. (Lond.). 

Introductory Address : " Science and Medicine." In Essays and Addresses by Professors 

and Lecturers of Owens College. 1874. 
English Translation of Hermann's Lehrbuch der Physiologic. Smith, Elder, and Co. 

ist edition, 1875. 2nd edition, in great part recast, with Notes and Commentaries 

by the Translator, 1878. 
A Text Book of the Physiological Chemistry of the Animal Body. Vol. 1. Macmillan and 

Co. 1880. 

Physiology of Digestion and the Digestive Organs. William Clowes and Sons. 1884. 
Articles on Nutrition and Respiration. In the Encyclopedia Britannica, gth edition. 
On the Growth of our Knowledge of the Function of Secretion. Presidential Address 

to the Biological Section of the British Association at Southampton. Brit. Assoc. 

Report. 1882. 

Some Old and New Experiments on the Fibrin-Ferment. Journ. ofPhys., 2. 1880. 
Ueber Protagon. Zeitschriftf. Physiol. Chemie, 3. 
On Protagon. Berlin Chem. Ges. Ber., 12. Journ. of Phys., 2. 1880. 
A Note on Protagon. Proc. Roy. Soc., 30. 1880. 

Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE and ERNST BLANKENHORN, Ph.D. 

On the Existence of Liebreich's Protagon in the Brain. Proc. Roy. Soc., 29. 1879. 

Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE and LEOPOLD LARMUTH, M.B. 

On the Action of Vanadium upon the Intrinsic Nervous Mechanism of the Frog's Heart. 
Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 

Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE, LEOPOLD LARMUTH, M.B., and JOHN PRIESTLEY, M.R.C.S. 

On the Difference in the Poisonous Activity of Phosphorus in Ortho-, Meta-, and Pyro- 

phosphoric Acids. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 
On the Action of Pyro-phosphoric Acid on the Circulation. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 

11. 1877. 

Professor ARTHUR GAMGEE and JOHN PRIESTLEY, M.R.C.S. 

Concerning the Effects on the Heart of Alternate Stimulation of the Vagi. Proc. Roy. 
Soc., 27. Journ. of Phys., 1. 1878 and 1879. 

I. WALKER HALL, M.B., Ch.B. 

A New Form of Ureameter. Med. Chron. 1899-1900. 

E. O. HOPWOOD, B.A., M.D. (see H. A. G. BROOKE). 

R. M. HORNE, M.D., CM. 

Muscle Plasma and its Coagulation. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Edin.) ; awarded 

Honours. 1895. 
The Action of Calcium, Strontium, and Barium Salts in Preventing Coagulation of the 

Blood. Journ. of Phys., 19. 1896. 



221 

LEOPOLD LARMUTH, M.B. 

On the Poisonous Action of Vanadium in Ortho-, Meta-, and Pyro-vanadic Acids. 

Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 
(See also ARTHUR GAMGEE.) 

J. ACWORTH MENZIES, M.D., CM. 

Methjetnoglobin. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Edin.). Awarded Gold Medal. 1894. 

On Methaemoglobin. Journ. of Phys., 17. 1895. 

On the Action of Certain Acids on Blood Pigment. Journ. of Phys., 17. 1895. 

C. F. MYERS-WARD, M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P. 

Structure and Function of the Mammalian Epididymis. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 32. 
1898. 

JOHN PRIESTLEY, M.R.C.S. 

On the Physiological Action of Vanadium. Phil. Trans. 1875. 

On the Physiological Action of Chromium. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1877. 

On the Physiology of Batrachian Lymph-Hearts. Proc. Roy. Soc., 27, and Journ. of 

Phys., 1. 1878. 
The Section treating of the Contractile Tissues (pp. 310-419), in Professor A. GAMGEE'S 

Physiological Chemistry of the Animal Body. 1880. 
(See also ARTHUR GAMGEE.) 

G. N. STEWART, M.A., M.D., D.Sc. 

Is the Law of Talbot true for very rapidly intermittent Light ? Proc. Roy. Soc. Edin., 15. 

1888. 
On Colour Phenomena, with Intermittent Stimulation of the Retina with White Light. 

Proc. Roy. Soc. Edin. 1888. 
Electrotonic Variation [in Nerves] with strong Polarising Currents. Proc. Roy. Soc. 

Edin., 16. 1889. 
The Electrolysis of Animal Tissues. Studies from the Physiological Laboratories of Owens 

College. 1891. 
On the Conditions which affect Loss of Heat by Radiation from the Animal Body. 

Studies from ttie Physiological Laboratories of Owens College. 1891. 
The Effect of Electrolysis and of Putrefaction on the Bile, and particularly on the Bile 

Pigments. Studies from the Physiological Laboratories of Owens College. 1891. 

Professor WILLIAM STIRLING, M.D., D.Sc. 

Outlines of Practical Histology. C. Griffin and Co. ist edition, 1888 ; 4th edition in 

the Press. 

Outlines of Practical Physiology. C. Griffin and Co. ist edition, 1890 : 2nd edition, 1893. 
Text-Book of Physiology by LANDOIS AND STIRLING. (Translated from the German, with 

numerous additions.) C. Griffin and Co. ist edition, 2 vols., 1885 ; 4th edition 

in the Press. 

IIH 



Professor WILLIAM STIRLING, M.D., D.Sc. continued. 

On Red and Pale Muscles in Fishes. Reports of Scottish Fishery Board. 1886. 
Some Economic Products from Fishes. Reports of Scottish Fishery Board. 1 886. 
Dry Cover-Glass Microscopical Preparations. Journ. ofAnat. and Phys., 24. 1890. 
Some Recent and some New Histological Methods. Journ. of Anal, and Phys., 24. 1890. 
On the Effects of certain Drugs on the Reflex Excitability of the Spinal Cord. Journ. of 

Anat. and Phys., 26. 1892. 

Recent Researches in Lymph-Formation. Med. Chron. 1894. 
Carl Ludwig : In Memoriam. Med. Chron. 1895. 
Some French Medical Institutions. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 
The Last of a Brilliant Quartette of Physiologists E. du Bois Reymond. Med. Chron. 

1896-7. 
Louis Pasteur. In Memoriam. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 



XIV. MATERIA MEDICA, PHARMACOLOGY, AND 

THERAPEUTICS. 

E. M. BROCKBANK, M.D. 

Gall-stones and Cholelithiasis. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Victoria). 1893. 

F. J. H. COUTTS, M.D. 

The Pharmacology of Hedera helix, the Common Ivy. Dissertation for M.D. Degree 

(Victoria). Awarded Gold Medal. 1898. 
(See also WATSON SMITH, under CHEMISTRY, p. 202, and T. N. KELYNACK, under 

PATHOLOGY, p. 227.) 

W. ELBORNE, M.A. 

Laboratory Course of Pharmacy and Materia Medica. C. Griffin and Co. 1890. 

Cinchona Barks. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1883. 

Exotic Henbane. Pharmaceut. Jou*n. 1883. 

Cod Liver Oil as prepared in England. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1883. 

Munjeet in Chiretta. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1883. 

Quinine Substitutes. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

Chemical Analysis of Rhubarb. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

Chinese Rhubarb. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

A Report on English Rhubarbs. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

Analysis of Colubrina Bark. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

Notes on Succus Taraxaci. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1884. 

Spurious Chiretta. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1886. 

The Chemistry of Strophanthus. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1886. 

Strophanthus and Strophanthin. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1887. 

The Cultivation of English Rhubarb. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1887. 

The Study of Vegetable Pharmacognosy. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1887. 






W. ELBORNE, M.A. continued. 

Chemical Analysis of Jambul Seed. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1887. 
Two varieties of Petala Rosse Gallics. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1887. 
Plant Structure and Pharmacognosy. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1888. 
Analysis of Seed of Cassia Tora. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1888. 

W. ELBORNE, M.A., and H. WILSON. 

Proximate Analysis of Columbria reclinata, Bark. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1885. 
Succus Taraxaci. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1885. 
Spurious Cubebs. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1885. 

J. GRIER. 

The Melting Point of soft Paraffins. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

The Detection of Water in Ether. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

The Pharmacy of the British Pharmacopoeia. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

J. H. HOSEASON. 

The Examination of some Commercial Medicated Wools. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1893. 
New Extraction Apparatus. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1896. 

WILLIAM KIRKBY, F.L.S., F.R.M.S. 

Note on a Sample of Adulterated Saffron. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1890. 

The Weights and Measures of the British Pharmacopoeia. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895 

Micrographic Pharmacognosy. Chemist and Druggist. 1895. 

Pharmaceutical Education. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1896. 

The Study of Pharmacognosy. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1896. 

The Clearing of Vegetable Microscopical Sections. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

Fluid Extract of Senecio Jacobaa. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

Thomas Henry and the Origin of Artificial Mineral Waters. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1898. 

The Study of Mounted Sections of Drugs. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1899. 

Professsor D. J. LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P. 

On Citrate of Caffein. Practitioner. 1880 

On Spiritus yEtheris Nitrosi. Practitioner. 1883. 

On Paraldehyde. Med. Chron. 1884-5. 

Nitrite of Ethyl. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 

The Comparative Effects of Spiritus ^Etheris Nitrosi and Solution of Nitrite of Ethyl. 
Pharmaceut. Journ. 1888. 

Recently introduced Hypnotics and Analgesics. Brit. Med. Journ. 1889. 

The Croonian Lectures, delivered at the Royal College of Physicians 1893. Physio- 
logical influence of groups of elements formed by Oxygen and Nitrogen. 
Pharmacology of Nitrates and Nitrites. Therapeutics of Nitrites and Nitro- 
glycerine. Pharmacology of certain groups allied to the Nitrites. Nitro-methane 
Nitro-ethane, Nitro-propane, Nitro-pentane, Nitrosamine, Diethyl and Dimethyl 



22 4 

Professor D. J. LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P. continued. 

Nitrosamine. The Hyponitrite group. The Oxime group. Brit, Med. Journ. 

1893. 
Article on Principles of Drug Therapeutics in Clifford AllbutPs System of Medicine. 

Macmillan and Co. 1896. 

The Work of a Therapeutic Society. Med. Chron. 1897. 
(See also MEDICINE, p. 233.) 

H. W. POMFRET, M.D., F.R.C.S. 

Nitrosophenol and Quinoxime. Dissertation for M.D. Degree ( Victoria), 1889. Awarded 

Gold Medal. 
Organic Oximides : A Research on their Pharmacology. Proc. Roy. Soc., 53, 1 893, and 

Phil. Trans. 1895. 

R. B. WILD, M.D., M.Sc., M.R.C.P. 

Action of Quinine, etc., on Contractile Tissues. Brit. Med. Journ. 1887. 

The Pharmacology of Pyrodine. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 

The Pharmacology of the Ipecacuanha Alkaloids. Lancet. 1895. 

Living Tissues as Chemical Reagents. Pharmaceut. Journ. 1897. 

Charcoal as a Therapeutic Agent. Parkin Prize Essay. 1896. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 

Boric Acid and Borax. Lancet. 1899. 

(See also PATHOLOGY, p. 229.) 

H. WILSON (see W. ELBORNE). 



XV. PATHOLOGY, MORBID ANATOMY, AND 
BACTERIOLOGY. 

JAMES CHARLES BUCKLEY, M.D. (Viet.) 

Laryngeal Tuberculosis. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Victoria). 1894. 

J. R. CARVER, M.D. 

The Typhoid Bacillus and its presence in the Excreta. Dissertation for M.D. Degret 
(Camb.). Med. Chron. 1898. 

P. R. COOPER, M.B., Ch.B., B.Sc., F.R.C.S. (see A. SHERIDAN DELEPJNE). 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE, M.B., C.M., B.Sc. 

A Case of Aphasia and Right Hemiplegia, with Temporary Spasmodic Conjugate 

Deviation of the Eyes, etc. Brit. Med. Journ. 1892. 
Protozoa and Carcinoma. Brit. Med. Journ. 1892. 
Tuberculous Infection through the Alimentary Canal. Address to the Medico-Ethical 

Society, Manchester, 1892. Med. Chron. 1895. 



( 22 5 ) 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEHNE, M.B., CM., B.Sc. continued. 

On the Value of Experimental Tuberculosis in Diagnosis. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 
On the Value of the Bacteriological Diagnosis of Asiatic Cholera. Brit. Med. Journ. 1894. 
Spread of Tuberculosis through the Lymphatics. Brit. Med. Journ. 1894. Med. 

Chron. \ 894. 

On the Disinfection of Rooms Infected with Tuberculous Products. Med. Chron. 1894. 
An Account of the Views held by the late Sir ANDREW CLARK on the Relations of 

Alveoli to Air Passages, with Remarks. Journ. of Pathol. and Bact. 1894. 
Prevalence of Tuberculosis in the Domesticated Animals. Med. Chron. 1895. 
Report on the Disinfecting and Antiseptic Properties of Izal. Med. Chron. 1895. 
Louis Pasteur. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 
The Teaching of Pathology. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 
Desirability of Legislation in connection with Tuberculosis of Living Domesticated 

Animals, and more specially of Cattle. Journ. of State Medicine. 1896. 
On the Place of Pathology in Medical Education. Presidential Address, Section of 

Pathology, Annual Meeting of the British Medical Association. Brit. Med. 

Journ. 1896. 
The Classification of Infiltrations and Degenerations. Preliminary Communication. 

Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 

Therapeutic Use of Rontgen's Rays (action on Bacteria). Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 
Sero-Diagnostic of Typhoid Fever. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 
On the Value of the Different Bacteriological Methods of Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever. 

Med. Chron. 1896-7. 
The Technique of Serum Diagnosis, with special reference to Typhoid Fever. Brit. 

Med. Journ. 1897. 

The Detection of the Pathogenic Properties of Milk. Journ. of Compar. Pathol. 1897. 
Some Experiments on Sterilisation by Steam. Journ. of State Medicine. 1897. 
The Bacteriological Diagnosis of certain Infectious Diseases in connection with Public 

Health Work. Lancet. 1898. 

Some of the Ways in which Milk becomes Pathogenic. Brit. Med. Journ. 1898. 
Disinfection. Journ. of the Sanitary Institute, 18. 1898. 

Bacteriological Survey of Surface Water Supplies. Journ. of State Medicine. 1898. 
Tuberculosis and the Milk Supply, with some General Remarks on the Dangers of 

Bad Milk. Lancet. 1898. 
Some Experiments on the Disinfection of Rooms by Gaseous Formaldehyde. Journ. 

of State Medicine. 1898. 

Article en Actinomycosis. Encyclopedia Medica, 1. William Green and Sons. 1899. 
Some Remarks on the Effects of the Pollution of Water Supplies. Med. Chron. 1899. 
The Prevention of Tuberculosis. Public Health. 1899. 
Prevention of Tuberculosis in Cattle : some Economic Aspects of the Question. 

(2 papers.) The Veterinarian. 1899. 
English Edition of Rieder's Atlas of Urinary Sediments. Numerous additions and 

annotations. Charles Griffin and Co. 1899. 
Experiments on Disinfection by Rapid Currents of Saturated Steam. (2 parts.) Journ. 

of State Medicine. 1900. 



( 22 6 ) 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELPINE in conjunction with T. LAUDER BRUNTON, M.D., F.R.S. 

Report on some of the Changes produced in Liver Cells by the Action of some Organic 
and Inorganic Compounds. Proc. Roy. Soc., 55. 1894. 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE and P. R. COOPER, M.B., Ch.B., B.Sc., F.R.C.S. 
A few Facts concerning Psorospermosis, etc. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE and Professor J. DIXON MANN. 

A Case of Tumour of the Pons. Brain. 1898. , 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE and Professor RANSOME, F.R.S. 

A Report on the Disinfection of Tubercle-infected Houses. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893 

and 1895. 
On the Influence of certain Natural Agents on the Virulence of the Tubercle Bacillus. 

Proc. Roy. Soc., 56. 1894. 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE and J. RICHMOND, M.A., M.B., M.R.C.S. 

Variability of the " Comma Bacillus " and the Bacteriological Diagnosis of Cholera. 
Journ. of Pathol. and Bact. 1895. 

Professor A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE and E. J. SIDEBOTHAM, M.A., M.B. 
On the Sero-Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever. Lancet. 1896. 

JOHN SMALLEY DOCKRAY, B.Sc., M.D. 

Experimental Calcification. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Victoria). iSgS. 

Professor JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., B.Sc., F.R.C.P. 

On a new Staining Fluid (Eosin). Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 11. 1876. 

A Peculiar Form of Liver Tumour. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. i?8o. 

Case of Cerebellar Tumour (Psammo-Sarcoma). Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 

Changes in the Spinal Cord after Amputation of Limbs. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 

1880. 

The Histology of Cirrhosis of the Liver. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1880. 
The Morbid Histology of the Liver in Acute Yellow Atrophy. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 

15. 1881. 
The Pathological Anatomy of Primary Lateral Sclerosis. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 

1881. 

The Pathology of Lung Complications in Diabetes. Med. Chron. 1884-5. 
And other papers. 
(See also MEDICINE, p. 231.) 

THOMAS HARRIS, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Post-Mortem Handbook. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1887. 
Indumtive Mediastino-Pericarditis. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1895. 
Pathology of Pneumono-Koniosis. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 
Pathology of Chronic Lobar Pneumonia. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 



T. HARRIS, M.D., F.R.C.P. continued. 

Clinical Lectures on the Pathology and Diagnosis of Early and Late Stages of Pulmonary 

Phthisis. Lancet. 1889. 
Pulsus Paradoxus, with special reference to its occasional occurrence on one side only. 

Lancet. 1899. 
Case of Multiple Spinal and Cerebral Tumours (Sarcomata), with a contribution to the 

Pathology of Syringomyelia. Brain. 1886. 
Primary Malignant Disease of the Pleura. Journ. of Pathol. and Bact. 1893. 

WILLIAM J. HOWARTH, M.D. 

The Treatment of Enlargements of the Thyroid Gland. Dissertation for M.D. Degree 
(Victoria). 1893. 

JOHN MOUNTFORT JOHNSON, M.D. 

Disinfection by means of the Vapours of some Members of the Phenol Series. Dissertation 
for M.D. Degree (Victoria). 1897. 

T. N. KELYNACK, M.D., M.R.C.P. 

The Pathology of the Vermiform Appendix. Dissertation for M.D. Degree ( Victoria}. 

Awarded Gold Medal. H. K. Lewis. 1893. 

Renal Growths, their Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Young J. Pent/and. 1898. 
The Pathologist's Handbook. /. and A. Churchill. 1899. 

Atropine Poisoning by Absorption from the Conjunctiva. Brit. Med. Journ. 1890. 
An Examination of 124 Cases of Acute Peritonitis. Jointly with F. A. SOUTHAM. 

Med. Chron. 1892. 

Cases of Meckel's Diverticulum. Journ. of Anat. and Phys. 1892. 
A Contribution to the Pathology of Pernicious Anaemia. Jointly with F. J. H. COUTTS. 

Med. Chron. 1892. 

Perforative Appendicitis, with Formation of Intra-Peritoneal Abscess. Med. Chron. 1892. 
A Fatal Case of Acute Benzene Poisoning. Med. Chron. 1893-4. 
Pathological Considerations on Surgical Interference for Perforative Ulcers of the 

Stomach and Duodenum. Brit. Med. Journ. 1894. 
A Case of Diffuse Phlegmonous Gastritis. Lancet. 1896. 

The Relation of Gall-Stones to Primary Cancer of the Gall Bladder. Practitioner. 1896. 
A Case of Adrenal Adenoma. Journ. of Anat. and Phys. \ 896. 

Malignant Papilliferous Cyst- Adenoma of the Kidney. Journ. of Pathol. and Bact. 1896. 
Stenosis of Hepatic Vein, with Intra-Hepatic Thrombosis. Medical Press and Circular. 

1897. 

Tuberculosis and Malignant Disease. Med. Chron. 1897. 
A Note on Rupture of Intra-Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms, based upon an Analysis of 

32 Cases. Lancet. 1897. 

A Case of the Marasmic Variety of Gastric Ulcer. Medical Press and Circular. 1897. 
On Dissecting Aneurysm of the Aorta. Edinburgh Med. Journ. 1898. 
A Fatal Case of Acute Arsenical Poisoning. Edinburgh Med. Journ. 1898. 
The Pathology of Renal Growths. Edinburgh Med. Journ. 1899. 



( "8 ) 

W. J. KERR, M.D. 

The Effects of Alcohol on the Liver. Dissertation far M.D. Degree (Victoria), 1895. 
Abstracted in Med. Chron. 1895-6. 

ROBERT MAGUIRE, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Macroglossia and Hygroma. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 

Malignant Bone Tumours. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 14. 1880. 

Primary Cancer of the Femur. Journ. of Anat. and Phys., 15. 1881. 

The Darkening . . . of certain Urines on Exposure to Air. Brit. Med. Journ. 1884. 

The Micrococcus of Pneumonia. Brit. Med. Journ. 1884. 

RICHARD WALTER MARSDEN, B.Sc., M.D. 

The Joint Affections in Scarlatina. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Victoria). 1896. 

F. CRAVEN MOORE, M.Sc., M.D. 

Scrofulous Lymphadenitis. Dissertation for M.D. Degree ( Victoria). Awarded Gold 

Medal, 1898. Journ. of Pathol. and Bact. 1899. 
Pathological Aspects of Acute Pancreatitis. Med. Chron. 1898. 
Unilateral Renal Aplasia. Journ. of Anat. and Phys. 1899. 
Hepatic Tuberculosis. Med. Chron. 1899. 

FRANK RADCLIFFE, M.D. 

The Spread of Tuberculosis in the Guinea Pig. Dissertation for M.D. Degree ( Victoria). 
1897. 

KNOWLES RENSHAW, M.D. 

Nasal Tuberculosis. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Camlt.), 1899. In course of 
Publication. 

J. RICHMOND, M.A., M.B., M.R.C.S. (see A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE). 

THOMAS ANDREW ROTHWELL, M.D. 

Aspergillosis. Dissertation for M.D. Degree (Victoria). 1899. 

E. J. SIDEBOTHAM, M.A., M.B. (see A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE). 

J. SIMCOCK, M.D. 

The Chronic Wasting of Children due to Improper Feeding. Lnscrialion fcr M.D. 
Degree ( Victoria). \ 893. 

FRANCIS VILLY, B.A., M.B. 

The Bone Marrow of Cancer Patients. Dissertation for ALB. Ltgnt (Caml.). Journ. of 

Path, and Bact. 1896. 
(See also NATURAL HISTORY, p. 213.) 



( 229 ) 

R. B. WILD, M.D., M.Sc., M.R.C.P. 

Angina pectoris. Med. Chron. 1 889. 

Uterine polypus. Med. Chron. 1891. 

Brown Induration of the Lungs. Med. Chron. 1891. 

Pathology of the Coronary Arteries. Med. Chron. 1892. 

Etiology and Treatment of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 

Constitutional Treatment of Skin Diseases. Brit. Med. Journ. 1899. 

Sources of Infection in Cutaneous Tuberculosis. Brit. Med. Journ. 1899. 

Article on Skin Diseases, in Clinical Medicine, by Dr. Bury. Charles Griffin and Co. 

ist edition, 1894 ; 2nd edition, 1899. 
(See also MATERIA MEDICA, p. 224.) 



XVI. MEDICINE AND SURGERY (INCLUDING DENTAL 

SURGERY). 

HENRY ASHBY, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Notes on Physiology. Longmans and Ce. ist edition, 1878; 6th edition, 1893. 

Health in the Nursery. Longmans and Co. ist edition, 1898; 2nd edition, 1899. 

Infant Feeding in relation to Infant Mortality. J. E. Cornish. 1896. 

Milk and Infantile Disease. J. E. Cornish. 1897. 

The Physiology and Pathology of Childhood. /. E. Cornish. 1880. 

And various Memoirs in the Medical Journals. 

HENRY ASHBY, M.D., F.R.C.P., and G. A. WRIGHT, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. 

Diseases of Children. Longmans and Co. ist edition, 1889; 4th edition, 1899. 

S. M. BRADLEY, F.R.C.S. 

Notes on Syphilis. J. and A. Churchill. 1872. 

Observations on the National Characteristics of Skulls. Manchester Memoirs [3], 5. 

1871. Published separately. Taylor and Francis. 1873. 
A New Method of Treating Hydrocele. Brit. Med. Journ. 1872. 

H. A. G. BROOKE, M.B., B.A. 

Drug Eruptions. Trans. Internal. Med. Congress, Berlin. 1890. 

Epithelioma adenoides cysticum. Brit. Journ. of Dcrmatol. 1892. 

Treatment of Syphilis. Med. Chron. 1895. 

Keratosis. Trans. Internal. Dermatol. Congress, London. 1896. 

Articles on Psoriasis and Lichen in Clifford Allbutfs System of Medicine. Mac mil/an and 

Co. 1899. 
And other papers. 
(See also PHYSIOLOGY, p. 219.) 

I I 



( 230 ) 

GEORGE G. CAMPION, L.D.S., R.C.S. 

Studies in Superior Protrusion. Trans. Odo ntological Soc. of Gt. Britain, 27. 1895. 

J. GRAY CLEGG, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.S. (see J. DIXON MANN). 

JOSEPH COLLIER, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S. 

Traumatic Hysteria in the Male. Mud. Chron. 1888. 

Tracheotomy. Lancet. 1888. 

Foreign Bodies in the Air-passages. Lancet. 1888. 

Suprapubic Lithotomy in Children. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 

Malformations of the External Genitals in the Male. Brit. Med. Journ. 1889. 

Symmetrical Gangrene. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 

Oblique Osteotomy for Anterior Curves of the Tibia. Med. Chron. 1889. 

Abscess of the Spleen. Brit. Med Journ. 1895. 

Foreign Body in the Knee joint. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 

Astragolectomy with Erasion for Pulpy Ankle. 1896. 

Influence of Athletics on Longevity. Insurance Institute Reports. 1897. 

JOSEPH COLLIER, M.B., B.S., F.R.C.S., and G. A. WRIGHT, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. 
Arthrectomy or Erasion of the Knee-joint. Annals of Surgery. 1889. 

Professor C. J. CULLINGWORTH, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Case of Vaginal Blood-cyst. Obstet. Journ. Gt. Britain. 1879. 

Fibroma (?) of both Ovaries. (Reprinted.) Trans. Obstet. Soc. Land. 1879. 

Case of Double Uterus with Complete Septum of the Vagina. Brit. Med. Journ. 1882. 

On the Operation for Rupture of the Female Perinaeum. (Reprinted.) (2 papers.) Med. 

Chron. 1884-5. 
Fatal Haemorrhage from a comparatively Slight Wound of the External Genital Organs in 

a Pregnant Woman. Med. Chron. 1885. 
Abdominal Section for the Removal of Small Intra-pelvic Tumours of the Ovaries and 

adjacent parts, with Notes of two Cases. Brit. Med. Journ. 1886. 

Case of Albuminuria during Pregnancy ; Induction of Premature Labour. Lancet. 1 886. 
Suprapubic Lithotomy in an Elderly Woman. Brit. Med. Journ. 1886. 
A Tabular Statement of Sixty-four Cases of Abdominal Section, including Forty-five 

Completed Ovariotomies, with Remarks. (2 papers.) (Reprinted.) Lancet. 1887. 
T\vo Cases of Occlusion of the Vagina, with Retention of Menstrual Fluid. (2 papers.) 

(Reprinted.) Med. Chron. 1887 and 1887-8. 

Case of Caesarian Section. (Reprinted.) Trans. Obstet. Soc. Land. 1887. 
A Second Series of Cases of Abdominal Section, including Eleven Completed Ovario- 
tomies. (2 papers.) Lancet. 1888. 
Cyst (Hydatid ?) connected with and simulating Enlargement of the Uterus. Trans , 

Obstet. Soc. Land. 1888. 
Renal Abscess caused by a Fragment of Carious Vertebra Ulcerating into the Kidney and 

forming the Nucleus of a Renal Calculus ; Operation ; Death ; Autopsy ; Remarks. 

(Reprinted.) Lancet. 1880. 



Professor C. J. CULLINGWORTH, M.D., F.R.C.P. continued. 

Purulent Non-Tubercular Meningitis in an Infant, Three Months after Injury. Med. Times 

and Gaz. 1880. 
Case of Acute Atrophy of the Liver, with Remarks. (2 papers.) Med. Times and Gaz. 

1881. 

Case of Nephrectomy for Hydronephrosis. Brit. Med. Journ. 1882. 
Address on the Place of Literature in Medicine. Lancet. 1883. 
The Criminal Responsibility of the Insane. An Address delivered at the Opening of the 

Session at the Owens College, Manchester. 1885. 
Impaction of a Large Calculus in each Ureter immediately above the Vesical Orifice, 

causing Dilatation of the Ureters and Abscesses in the Kidneys : Abdominal 

Section. (Reprinted.) Trans. Path. Soc. 1885. 
A case of Diaphragmatic Empyema. Brit. Med. Journ. 1886. 
Removal by Abdominal Section of a Large Sarcoma of the Kidney. (Reprinted.) Med. 

Chron. 1886-7. 

Professor JULIUS DRESCHFELD, M.D., B.Sc., F.R.C.P. 

On Family Predisposition in Locomotor Ataxy. Manchester and Liverpool Reports. 

1876. 

The Course of the Optic Nerve Fibres. Brain. 1882. 
On Alcoholic Paralysis. Brain. 1884 and 1886. 

Some of the Rarer Forms of Muscular Atrophy. Brain. 1885 and 1886. 
On Diabetic Coma (Bradshawe Lecture). Brit. Med. Journ. 1886. 
Nervous Sequelae of Epidemic Influenza. Med. Chron. 1897-8. 
Less Common Forms of Albuminuria. Med. Chron. 1899. 
Articles on Infective Endocarditis, Enteric Fever (1896), Ulcer of the Stomach 

and Duodenum (1897), Endocarditis (1898) in Clifford Allbutfs System of 

Medicine. Macmillan and Co. 
And numerous other papers. 
(See also PATHOLOGY, p. 226.) 

CHARLES EDWARD GLASCOTT, M.D., F.R.C.S.E. 

Three cases of Cilia in the Anterior Chamber. Lancet. 1883. 

Case of Traumatic Aneurism of Left Orbit cured by Compression of the Carotid. 

Ophthalmic Review. 1883. 

Causes and Prevention of Blindness. Henshaw's Asylum Reports. 1886. 
A Further Report on the Causes of Blindness. Henshaw's Asylum Reports. 1890. 
Cyclic Albuminuria. Trans. Insurance Institute. 1886. 
Abstracts and Reviews of Ophthalmic Literature in Med. Chron., since its foundation. 

JAMES HARDIE, F.R.C.S. 

The Operation for the Radical Cure of Inguinal Hernia. Med. Chron. 1885. 
Two cases of Distal Transplantation of Skin. Med. Chron. 1888. 
And other papers. 



( 232 ) 

DAVID HEADRIDGE, L.D.S., R.C.S. 

Should we fill Pulp Canal? Trans. Manch. Odontol. Soc. 1893. 

Experiments in the Vulcanising of Dental Rubbers. Trans. Manch. Odontol. Sx. 1899. 

F. A. HEATH, M.R.C.S. 

Rupture of the Rectum. Lancet. 1887. 

Cerebral Tumour. Lancet. 1888. 

Triple Primary Amputation. Med. Chron. 1889. 

And other papers. 

(See also WILLIAM ROBERTS.) 

ALEXANDER HODGKINSON, M.B., C.M., B.Sc. 

Examination of the Posterior Nares. Brit. Med. Journ. 1877. 

On the Vibration of the Vocal Cords. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 

On Chorditis Tuberosa. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 

Accurate Determination of Absorption Spectra. Manchester Memoirs [4], 3. 1890. 

On Iridescent Colours, etc. Manchester Memoirs [4], 5. 1892. 

Professor THOMAS JONES, M.B., F.R.C.S. 

Diseases of the Bones. J. E. Cornish. 1887. 

Successful Gastrostomy in Non-Malignant Stricture of the (Esophagus. Lancet. 1882. 

Resection of the Ankle for Accident and Disease. Brit. Med. Journ. 1883. 

Total Extirpation of the Larynx for Epithelioma. Lancet. 1884. 

And other papers. 

Professor THOMAS JONES and J. E. PLATT, M.D., M.S., F.R.C.S. 

Injuries and Diseases of the Ankle joint. Encyclopedia Medica, 1. W. Green and Sons. 
1889. 

ARNOLD W. W. LEA, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.S. 

laceration of the Perinaeum and Vagina in Primiparae. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 

Organic Heart Disease during Pregnancy and Labour. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 

A Breech Presentation with Extended Legs. Trans. Obstet. Soc. London. 1897. 

The Sagittal Fontanel in the Heads of Infants at Birth. Trans. Obstet. Soc. London. 

1898. 

A case of Tubercular Disease of the Uterus. Med. Chron. 1897. 
The Diagnosis of Pathological Conditions of the Endometrium. Med. Chron. 1898. 
Vaginal Incision in Acute Pyosalpinx. Med. Chron. 1898. 

The Local Treatment of Puerperal Infection, with Notes of 48 Cases. Med. Chron. 1899. 
Two cases of Puerperal Septicaemia due to Streptococcic Infection. Brit. Med. Journ. 

1899. 

The Medical Inspection of Board Schools. Trans. Inst. of Public Health Congress. 1899. 
A case of Sarcoma of the Ovary in Girl of 13, with remarks. Trans. North of Eng. 

Obstet. and Gynacol. Soc. 1899. 



( 233 ) 

Professor D. J. LEECH, M.D., D.Sc., F.R.C.P. 

Our Forefathers : An Introductory Address delivered at Leeds. John Htywood. 1895. 

Addison's Disease with Peculiar Pigmentation. Trans. Path. Soc. Land. 1879. 

Glomerular Nephritis. Brit. Med. Journ. 1881. 

Paracentesis in Pericardial Effusion. Med. Chron. 1885. 

Health Resorts of the Black Forest. Med. Chron. 1886-7. 

Spontaneous Diuresis. Med. Chron. 1887-8 and 1888. 

Les Avants as a Winter Health Resort. Med. Chron. 1889-90. 

Sierre as a Health Resort. Practitioner. 1890. 

Infectious Pneumonia, followed by Peripheral Neuritis. Med. Chron. 1890-91. 

The Treatment of Pneumonia. Med. Chron. 1894 and 1894-5. 

Winter Resorts of Switzerland. Med. Chron. 1896. 

The Treatment of Bronchitis. Practitioner. 1898. 

Article on Asthma. Encyclopedia Medial, 1. W. Green and Sons. 1899. 

(See also MATERIA MEDICA, pp. 223-4.) 

DAVID LITTLE, M.D. 

On Cataract Extraction. Med. Chir. Review. 1873. 

The Operative Treatment of Zonular Cataract. Brit. Med. Journ. 1888. 

On Extraction of Senile Cataract ; Results of 1,248 Extractions. Brit. Med. Journ. 1889. 

And other papers. 

Professor EDWARD LUND, F.R.C.S. 

Internal Urethrotomy. J. and A. Churchill. 1877. 

The Removal of the Entire Tongue by the Walter Whitehead Method. J. and A. Churchill 

andj. E. Cornish. 1880. 

The Present Aspect of the Antiseptic Question. J. E. Cornish. 1883. 
The Hunterian Lectures for 1885. J. and A. Churchill. 1886. 
Five Years' Surgical Work in the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Liverpool and Manch. 

Med. and Surg. Reports. 1873. 

Professor J. DIXON MANN, M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. Chas. Griffin and Co. ist edition, 1893; 2nd 

edition, 1898. 

On Ptomaines in relation to Disease. Med. Chron. 1887-8 and 1888. 
On the Rate of Absorption and Elimination in Strychnine Poisoning. Med. Chron. 183;. 
Cheyne-Stokes Breathing. Brain. 1890. 
Addison's Disease. Lancet. 1891. 
Granular Kidney. Lancet. 1895. 

On the Action of Mercury Haemol. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 
On Meat Poisoning. Med. Chron. 1896. 

The Statistics of Carbolic Acid Poisoning. Med. Chron. 1896-7 and 1897. 
On the Danger of Water Gas as an Illuminant. Med. Chron. 1897 and 1898. 
Sudden or Unexpected Death from Natural Causes. Lancet. 1897. 
And other papers. 
(See also A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE, under PATHOLOGY, p. 226, and below.) 



( '34 ) 

Professor J. DIXON MANN and J. GRAY CLEGG, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.S. 
Toxic Action of Arsenetted Hydrogen. Med. Chron. 1895. 

L. MATHESON, L.D.S., R.C.S. 

Artificial Separation of the Teeth. Journ. Brit. Dent. Assoc. 1885. 

WILLIAM MILLIGAN, M.D., C.M. 

A New Intra-Tympanic Syringe. Journ of Laryngol. and Otol. 1892. 

The Etiology and Treatment of Purulent Inflammation of the Middle Ear, accompanied 

by Perforation of Shrapnell's Membrane. Med. Chron. 1892-3. 
An Apparatus for Continuous Irrigation with Warm Fluids in the Initial Stages of Acute 

Inflammatory Affections of the Middle Ear. Med. Chron. 1892-3. 
A case of Pachydermia Laryngis. Journ. of Laryngol. and Otol. 1893. 
Pachydermia Laryngis. Medical Annual. 1895. 

The Etiology and Treatment of Aural Polypi. Clin. Journ., 2. 1893. 
The Treatment of Chronic Suppuration of the Middle Ear by Excision of the Auditory 

Ossicles. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 
Two cases of Middle Ear Disease Treated by a Modified Mastoid Operation. Med. Chron. 

1893. 
The Etiology, Pathology, and Treatment of Acute and Chronic Otitis Media Purulenta. 

International Clinics, 2. 1894. 

Intra-Tympanic Operations. Medical Annual. 1894. 
Two cases of Cholesteatoma corrfplicating Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media, with remarks. 

Liverpool Medico- Chirurg. Journ. 1894. 

A New Antral (Maxillary) Drainage Tube (illustrated). Journ. Laryngol. and Otol. 1894. 
Observations upon Excision of the Ossicula Auditus in Chronic Suppurative Otitis Media. 

Brit. Med. Journ. 1894. 
Vocal Defects amongst School Board Teachers, with special reference to the Occurrence 

of Teachers' Nodes. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 
Thrombosis of the Intra-Cranial Sinuses secondary to Suppurative Disease of the Middle 

Ear. Lancet. 1895. 
Tuberculous Disease of the Mucous Membrane of the Middle Ear and its Adnexa ; an 

Experimental Investigation. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 
Empyema of the Nasal Accessory Sinuses. Medical Annual. 1895. 
Tuberculous Disease of the Middle Ear. Med. Chron. 1895-6. 
Naso-Pharyngeal Adenoid Vegetations and their Relation to Morbid Affections of the Ear. 

International Clinics, 2. 1896. 
Presidential Address The Value of Observation. Delivered before the British Laryngolo- 

gical, Rhinological, and Otological Association. Journ. of Laryngol. and Otol. 

1896. 
A case of Temporo-Sphenoidal Abscess secondary to Acute Left sided Suppurative Middle 

Ear Disease ; Operation ; Acute Hernia Cerebri ; Death. Archives of Otology, 25. 

1896. 

Two cases of Sarcoma of the Middle Ear. Archiv:s of Otology, 25. 1896. 
Otitic Tuberculosis. Medical Annual. \ 896. 



( '35 ) 

WILLIAM MILLIGAN, M.D., C.M. continued. 

Operative Treatment of Suppurative Middle Ear Disease. Liverpool Medico- Chirurg. 

Journ. 1897. 

Angina Epiglottidea Anterior. Journ. of Laryngol. and Otol. 1897. 
Otitis Media Suppurativa Chronica ; Cerebral Abscess ; Operation ; Recovery. Journ. of 

Laryngol. and Otol. 1897. 
The yEtiology and Treatment of Suppurative Disease of the Frontal Sinuses. Lancet. 

1898. 
Some Observations upon Antrectonfy as a Means of Treatment in Suppurative Middle Ear 

Disease. Journ. of Laryngol. and Otol. 1898. 
The Mutual Relationship and Relative Value of Experimental Research and Clinical 

Experience in Otology. Brit. Med. Journ. 1898. 
Some Observations upon the Pathology of Intra-Cranial Suppuration of Otitic and Rhinitic 

Origin. Med. Chron. 1898-9. 
Article on the ^Etiology, Pathology, and Treatment of Suppurative Middle Ear Disease 

and its Complications. Encyclopaedia Medica, 3. W. Green and Sons. 1 900. 
And other papers. 

Professor JOHN EDWARD MORGAN, M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P. 
University Oars. Macmillan and Co. 1873. 
Medical Education at the Universities. J. E. Cornish. 1875. 
Medicine in 1876. An Introductory Address delivered before the Owens College 

Medical School. /. E. Cornish. 1876. 
On the Application of Electricity directly to Nerves and Muscles by means of Acupuncture. 

Lancet. 1879. 
And other papers. 

JAMES NIVEN, M.A., M.B. 

Review of the Report of the Royal Commission on Tuberculosis. Reprinted from 

Public Health. 1898. 

Annual Report on the Health of Manchester for 1897. Henry Blacklock and Co. 1898. 
Tuberculous Meat and Milk. Trans, of the Sanitary Institute. 1898. 
On the Statistics of some Lancashire Industries. John Heywood. 1899. 
Prevention of Tuberculosis. Henry Blacklock and Co. 1899. 
Annual Report on the Health of Manchester for 1898. Henry Blacklock and Co. 1899. 

J. E. PLATT, M.D., M.S., F.R.C.S. (see THOMAS JONES). 

Professor ARTHUR RANSOME, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S. 

A Series of Health Lectures, 1875-90. John Heywood. 

Stethometry. Macmillan and Co. 1876. 

State Medicine in England. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1877. 

Prognosis in Lung Disease. Macmillan and Co. 1882. 

Limits of Infectiveness of Tubercle. J.E.Cornish. 1884. 

Milroy Lectures : The Prevention of Phthisis. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1890. 



( '36 ) 

Professor ARTHUR RANSOME, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S. continued. 

Treatment of Phthisis. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1896. 

Researches on Tuberculosis. VVeber-Parkes Prize Essay. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1897. 

Losses and Gains in Death-Toll. Manchester Memoirs [3], 6. 1877. 

Epidemic Cycles. Manch. Lit. and Phil. Soc. Proc., 19. 1880. 

Address on Public Medicine. Brit. Aled. Journ. 1881. 

Success of Sanitary Effort. Trans, of Sanitary List., 1. 1885. 

Prevention of Consumption. Trans, of Sanitary Inst., 9. 1887. 

Intra-pulmonary Injections. Med. Chron. 1886-7 

Tubercular Infective Areas. Trans. Epid. Soc., 6. 1888. 

The Form of the Epidemic Wave. Trans. Epid. Soc. 1888. 

Treatment of Phthisis by Ozone. Med. Chron. 1888 and 1889. 

Economic Aspect of Sanitation. Co-operative Annual. 1888. 

Scientific Work of Sanitary Inspectors. Assoc. of Publ. Sanitary Inspectors. 1888. 

Vital Statistics of Towns. Trans. Manch. Statist. Soc. 1888. 

The Consumption Scare. Med. Chron. 1894-5. 

(See also A. SHERIDAN DELEPINE, under PATHOLOGY, p. 226.) 

D. LLOYD ROBERTS, M.D., F.R.C.P., F.R.S.E. 

The Practice of Midwifery. J. and A. Churchill. 4th edition, 1896. 

Edition with Biographical Introduction of Browne's Religio Medici. Smith, Elder, and Co. 

1898. 
And papers in the Medical Journals. 

Professor Sir WILLIAM ROBERTS, M.D., B.A., F.R.C.P., F.R.S. (') 

Clinical Pocket-book : an aid to the study of Clinical Medicine for the use of Students of 

the Manchester Royal Infirmary. Smith, Elder, and Co. 1874. 
On the Digestive Ferments and Artificially Digested Food, being the Lumleian Lectures 

for the year 1 880, before the Royal College of Physicians. Smith, Elder, and Co. 

ist edition, 1880. 2nd edition, revised with additions, 1881. 
Lectures on Dietetics and Dyspepsia, delivered at the Owens College. Smith, Elder, 

and Co. ist edition, 1885. 2nd edition, 1886. 
Alcohol as a cause of Bright's disease, and Dr. Dickinson's statistics. Brit. Med. Journ. 

2. 1872. 
Clinical Remarks on Hydatid Cysts. Liverpool and Manchester Med. and Surg. Reports. 

1873- 
On Exploring and Tapping. Liverpool and Manchester Med. and Surg. Reports. 

Reprinted, Manchester. 1873. 
Preparations and Experiments bearing on the question of Biogenesis. Manch. Lit. and 

Phil. Soc. Proc. 12. 1872. 
Studies on Biogenesis. Phil. Trans. 1874. 

On the Origin of Bacteria and on Abio-genesis. Brit. Med. Journ., 1. 1876. 
On the Estimation of Albumen in Urine by a New Method. Med. Chir. Trans., 59. 1876. 

(') List mainly derived from a bibliography by Dr. C. J. Cut-LlNGWORTH. Med. Chron. 1899. 



( '37 ) 

Professor Sir WILLIAM ROBERTS, M.D., B.A., F.R.C.P., F.R.S. continued. 

On the Influence of Liquor Potassae and an Elevated Temperature on the Origin and 

Growth of Microphytes. Proc. Roy. Soc., 25. 1876. 
The Respirator-Inhaler. Brit. Med. Journ., 1. 1877. 
The Doctrine of Contagium-Vivum and its Applications to Medicines : the Address in 

Medicine delivered at the meeting of the Brit. Med. Assoc., Manchester, 1877. 

Quart. Journ. Microsc. Science, 17, 1877 ; also Brit. Med. Journ. (Reprinted under 

the title " On Spontaneous Generation and the Doctrine of Contagium Vivum," 

Lond., 1877.) 
Articles on Haematuria, Endemic Haematuria, Haematinuria and Paroxysmal Haematinuria, 

Albuminuria, Congestion of the Kidneys, Bright's Disease, and Anomalies of 

Position, Form, and Number of the Kidneys. Reynolds'! Syst. of Med., 5. 

Macmillan and Co. 1879. 
Hysteria in Boys. Practitioner, 23. 1879. 

A Contribution to the Therapeutics of Starch Digestion. Practitioner, 23. 1879. 
Malt Extracts (Letter). Med. Times and Gaz., 1. 1879. 

On the Digestive Ferments and their Therapeutical uses. Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 1879. 
On the Existence of a Milk-curdling Ferment in the Pancreas. Proc. Roy. Soc., 29. 1879. 
Peptonised Beef-tea (Note). Brit. Med. Journ., 1. 1880. 
Pancreatised Papers (Note). Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 1880. 
On the estimation of the Amylolytic and Proteolytic Activity of Pancreatic Extracts. Proc. 

Roy. Soc., 32, 1881. 33, 1882. 

On the occurence of Micro-Organisms in fresh Urine. Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 1881. 
On some New Articles of Peptonised Food, prepared by the Pancreatic Method. Trans. 

Intern. Med. Congress, 1. Land., 1881. 
On Bacilluria, a Form of Urinary Disorder associated with the discharge of rod-shaped 

Bacteria with the Urine. Trans. Intern. Med. Congress, 2. Land., 1881. 
On a New Test for Albumen in Urine. Lancet, 2. 1882. 
Some New Ways of Testing for Albumen in the Urine (abstract). Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 

1882. 

Micrococci from Fresh Urine (Note). Brit. Med. Journ., 1. 1882. 
"Peptonised Food," article in Quairis Diet, of Med. Lond., 1882. 
On Collective Investigation of Diseases. An Address. Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 1883. 
Albuminuria, its Pathology and Clinical Significance. Brit. Med. Journ. 1884. 
On Tests for Albumen in Urine, New and Old. Med. Chron. 1884-5. 
On Feeding the Sick. Address in Therapeutics delivered before the Brit. Med. Assoc. at 

Cardiff, 1885. Brit. Med. Journ., 2. 1885. 
On the Chemical Constitution and Physiological Relations of the Amorphous Urate 

Deposit. Med. Chron. 1887-8. 

Professor Sir WILLIAM ROBERTS and F. A. HEATH, M.R.C.S. 
Case of Hepatic Abscess. Lancet, 1. 1881. 

Professor JAMES Ross, M.D., LL.D., F.R.C.P. 

Handbook to the Diseases of the Nervous System. J. and A. Churchill. 1885. 

KK 






Professor JAMES Ross and JUDSON S. BURY, M.D., F.R.C.P. 
On Peripheral Neuritis. Charles Griffin and Co. 1893. 

HENRY SIMPSON, M.D. 

The Treatment of Internal Aneurism. Brit. Med.Journ. 1878. 
And other papers. 

Professor W. J. SINCLAIR, M.A., M.D., M R.C.P. 

Monograph, on Gonorrhceal Infection in Women. H. K. Lewis. 1888. 

Vaginal Hysterectomy for Cancer. Med. Chron. 1890. 

Vaginal Hysterectomy for Cancer. Practitioner. 1889. 

Laceration of the Cervix Uteri the lessons from 250 cases. Proceedings of International 

Medical Congress at Berlin. 1890. 
Metrostaxis after Operations on the Broad Ligament. Brit. Med.Journ. and Provincial 

Med. fourn. 1893. 

Intraperitoneal Myomotomy. British Gynecological Society. 1893. 
Ventrofixation of the Uterus. Med. Chron. 1894. 

On a Method of treating Contracted Bladder in Women. Med. Chron. 1894-5. 
Article on Malignant Diseases of the Uterus. In Clifford Allbutt and Play/air's System 

of Gynaecology. 1 896. 
And other papers. 

F. A. SOUTHAM, M.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. 

Regional Surgery. A Manual for Students. J. and A. Churchill, London. 1882. 

Fat-embolism in Fractures. Lancet. 1880. 

On Nerve-Stretching. Lancet. 1881. 

On Torticollis and its Treatment by Neurectomy. Brit. Med. Jour n. 1885. 

Article on Fractures, in A Manual of Surgery. Casse II and Co., London. 1886. 

Sarcoma of the Bladder. Med. Chron. 1888. 

The Pathology of Tumours of the Bladder. Med. Chron. 1889. 

Scirrhus of the Bladder. Med. Chron. 1888. 

On the Indications for Suprapubic Cystotomy. Lancet. 1891. 

On Lithotrity in Children. Med. Chron. 1890. 

On Exfoliating Cystitis. Med. Chron. 1892-3. 

The Treatment of Stricture of the Urethra. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 

The Treatment of Fracture of the Neck of the Femur. Lancet. 1 894. 

On the Traumatic Origin of Loose Bodies in the Knee-joint. Med. Chron. 1894. 

On Recent Advances in Urinary Surgery. Med. Chron. 1894-5. 

On the Radical Cure of Hydrocele by Excision of the Sac. Lancet 1897. 

On the Pathology of Recurrent Appendicitis. Lancet. 1897. 

On the Treatment of Recurrent Appendicitis. Lancet. 1897. 

Cases of Perityphlitic Abscess of Cscal Origin. Brit. Med. Journ. \ 898. 

Article on Injuries and Diseases of the Bladder. Encyclopaedia Medica, 1. \V. Green and 

Sons. 1 899. 
And other papers. 



'39 



GRAHAM STEELL, M.D., F.R.C.P. 



The Physical Signs of Cardiac Disease. J. E. Cornish. ist edition, 1882 ; znd edition, 
1891. 

The Use of the Sphygmograph in Clinical Medicine. Sherratt and Hughes. 1899. 

Bronchial Breath Sounds. Med. Chron. 1886. 

Two Cases of Cirrhosis of the Lung. Med. Chron. 1887-8. 

The Auscultatory Signs of Mitral Obstruction and Regurgitation. Med. Chron. 1888. 

Case of Excavated Malignant Tumour of the Lung. Lancet. 1888. 

Aortic Disease of the Heart. Practitioner. 1889. 

On a Method of determining the Size of the Heart by Percussion. Med. Chron. 1890. 

On certain Fallacious Auscultatory Signs. Med. Chron. 1890. 

The Clinical Features of Typhus Fever (2 papers). Practitioner. 1890. 

The Dyspnoea of advanced Bright's Disease. Med. Chron. 1891-2. 

The Treatment of Fevers. Opening Discussion, Clinical Society of Manchester. Med. 
Chron. 1892. 

The Pulse in Aortic Stenosis. Lancet. 1894. 

On Physical Signs met with in a Case of Pneumonia. Lancet. 1893. 

The Auscultatory Signs, etc., of Mitral Stenosis. A Statistical Enquiry. Med. Chron. 
1895. 

Heart Disease : A Retrospect over Twenty-five Years. Presidential Address delivered 
before the Manchester Medical Society. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 

Clinical Lecture on case of Tumour of the Lung. Lancet. 1894. 

Muscle Failure of the Heart due to Chronic Alcoholism. International Clinics [7], 3, 
J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia. 1897. 

Aortic Disease of the Heart. International Clinics [8], 1. J. B. Lippincott Co., Phila- 
delphia. 1898. 

Mitral Stenosis. International Clinics [8], 3. J. B. Lippincott Co., Philadelphia. 1898. 

And other papers. 

JOHN F. W. TATHAM, M.A., M.D., F.R.C.P. 

Manchester Life Tables. Published by the Corporation of Manchester. 1893. 
Reports on the Health of Greater Manchester. Published Ly the Corporation of Manchester. 
1889-93. 

Professor JOHN THORBURN, M.D.('). 

Female Education from a Physiological Point of View. f. E. Cornish. 1884. 

A Treatise on the Diseases of Women. CAas. Griffin and Co. \ 885. 

Vaccination. J. E. Cornish. 1870. 

Medical Treatment of the Unborn Child. Liverpl. and Manch. Med. and Surg. Reports. 

1875- 
And other papers. 

(') List furnished by Mr. W. THORBURN, F.R.C.S. 



WILLIAM THORBURN, M.D., B.S., B.Sc., F.R.C.S. 

A Contribution to the Surgery of the Spinal Cord. Chas. Griffin and Co. 1889. 

On Obstetrical Paralysis. Med. Chron. 1885-6. 

Injury to the Cervical Region of the Spinal Cord. Brain. 1887. 

Injuries of the Cauda Equina. Brain. 1888. 

Trephining the Spine for compression of the Spinal Cord. Brit. Med. Journ. 1888. 

Spinal Localisations. Brain. 1888. 

A case of Lymphangioma. Illustrated Medical News. 1 888. 

Traumatic Hysteria especially in relation to Railway Accidents. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 

Injuries of the Lumbo-Sacral Region of the Spinal Cord. Med. Chron. 1889. 

Tumour of the Cauda Equina. Med. Chron. 1889. 

Pathology of Tumours of the Breast. Illustrated Medical News. 1889. 

Cases of Disease of the Male Breast. Brit. Med. Journ. 1890. 

Epithelioma of the Tonsil. Brit. Med. Journ. 1890. 

Perforation of the Appendix Vermiformis. Med. Chron. 1890. 

Operative Treatment of Unreduced Dislocations of the Shoulder. Med. Chron. 1891. 

Cases of " Reduction en Masse." Med. Chron. 1891. 

Aneurism of the Dorsalis Pedis Artery. Brit. Med. Journ. 1891. 

Femoral Aneurism Operation of Contillus. Brit. Med. Journ. 1892. 

The Reflexes in Spinal Injuries. Med. Chron. and Trans. Path. Soc. Land. 1892. 

Hypertrophic Pulmonary Osteoarthropathy. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 

The Sensory Distribution of Spinal Nerves. Brain. 1893. 

Hunterian Lectures. Brit. Med. Journ. 1894. 

Address on Surgical Treatment of Injuries of Spine and Spinal Cord, delivered at Bristol. 

Medical Press and Circular. 1894. 

Clinical Lecture on Aneurism. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 

Pathology of Hypertrophic Pulmonary Osteoarthropathy. Trans. Path. Soc. Land. 1897. 
Luxation of Sesamoid Bone. Med. Chron. 1896-7. 
Doubtful Cases of Volvulus of the Small Intestine. Med. Chron. 1898. 
Article on the Brachial Plexus. Encyclopedia Medica, 2. W. Green and Sons. 1 899. 

Professor WALTER WHITEHEAD, F.R.C.S.E., F.R.S.E. 

Excision of the Tongue, followed by Tracheotomy and subsequent Gastrostomy. Brit. 

Med. Journ. 1882. 

The Surgical Treatment of Haemorrhoids. Brit. Med. Journ. 1882. 
The Surgical Treatment of Tumours and other obscure conditions of the Bladder (3 parts). 

Lancet. 1883. 

Excision of the Caecum for Epithelioma. Brit. Med. Journ. 1885. 
Excision of the Tongue. Lancet. 1888. 
And many other papers. 

GEO. O. WHITTAKER, L.D.S., R.C.S. 

The Advantages of a few Methods of Gold Filling. Brit. Journ. of Dental Science. 

1889. 
Method of Crowning Teeth with Gold. Brit. Journ. of Dental Science. 1895. 



( 241 ) 

R. B. WILD, M.D., M.Sc., M.R.C.P. (see MATERIA MEDICA, etc., p. 224, and PATHOLOGY, 
p. 229). 

RICHARD T. WILLIAMSON, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.P. 

On the Relation of Diseases of the Spinal Cord to the Distribution and Lesions of the 

Spinal Blood Vessels. H. K. Lewis. 1895. 

Diabetes Mellitus and its Treatment. Young J. Pentland. 1898. 
Syphilitic Diseases of the Spinal Cord. Sherratt and Hughes. 1899. 
On so-called Serous Cysts of the Cerebellum. Internat. Journ. of Medical Science. 1892. 
The Changes in the Optic Tracts and Chiasma in a case of Unilateral Optic Atrophy. 

Brain. 1892. 

Some points in the Etiology and Pathology of Diabetes Mellitus. Lancet. 1892. 
The Knee-jerks and Peripheral Neuritis in Diabetes Mellitus. Med. Chron. 1892-3. 

(Afterwards included in the work on Peripheral Neuritis by Dr. Ross and 

Dr. J. S. BURY, see p. 238.) 
Case of Myelitis simulating Haematomyelia by its sudden onset Analgesia and Thermo- 

Anaesthesia. Lancet. 1893. 

The Direct Pyramidal Tracts of the Spinal Cord. Brit. Med. Journ. 1893. 
Cases of Anaemia with Great Enlargement of the Spleen (Splenic Anaemia) ; Pathological 

Changes in the Spleen. Med. Chron. 1893. 
Changes in the Posterior Columns of the Spinal Cord in Diabetes Mellitus. Brit. Med. 

Journ. 1894. 

Condition of the Pancreas in 15 consecutive cases of Diabetes Mellitus. Lancet. 1894. 
Spinal Thrombosis and Haemorrhage due to Syphilitic Disease of the Vessels. Lancet. 

1894. 

A Bread Substitute for Diabetic Patients. Brit. Med. Journ. 1895. 
The Clinical Value of the Phenyl-hydrazin Test for Sugar in the Urine. Med. Chron. 

1895. 

Note on the Therapeutic use of Celloidin. Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 
A Simple Method of distinguishing Diabetic from Non-Diabetic Blood. Brit. Med. 

Journ. 1896. 
On the Symptomatology of Gross Lesions (tumours and abscesses) of the Praefrontal 

Region of the Brain. Brain. 1896. 

Remarks on the Prognosis in Exophthalmic Goitre. Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 
Diabetes Mellitus and Lesions of the Pancreas. Med. Chron. 1897. 
The Knee-jerks in Diabetes Mellitus. Lancet. 1897. 
On "Touch Paralysis," or the inability to recognise the nature of objects by tactile 

impressions. Brit. Med. Journ. 1897. 
Unilateral Retinal Changes in cases of Cerebral Haemorrhage, Embolism, and Thrombosis. 

Brit. Med. Journ. 1898. 
The Pathological Changes in a case of Syphilitic Spinal Paralysis. Brit. Med. Journ. 

1898. 
Remarks on certain affections of Sensation in Diseases of the Nervous System. Med. 

Chron. 1898-9. 



RICHARD T. WILLIAMSON, M.D., B.S., F.R.C.P. continued. 

Eine leichte Methode, das Blut eines Diabetikers von dem Blute eines Nicht-diabetikers 
zu unterscheiden." Centralblatt fur innere Median (Leipzig), No. 33, 1897. 

Article on Diabetes Mellitus. Encyclopedia Medico, 2. W. Green and Sons. 1899. 

Cases of Melanotic Sarcoma of the Brain and Liver. Med. Chron. 1899-1900. 

On Loss of the Knee-jerks in gross Lesions of the Pnefrontal Region of the Brain. Glas- 
gow Med. Journ. 1899. 

On Loss of the Stereognostic Sense. Brit. Med. Journ. 1899. 

RICHARD T. WILLIAMSON, M.I)., in conjunction with Professor J. BERRY HAYCRAFT, 

M.D., D.Sc. 

Preliminary note on a method by means of which the Alkalinity of the Blood may 
be quantitatively determined. Proc. Roy. Soc. Edin., 15. 1888. 

Professor W. C. WILLIAMSON, LL.D., F.R.S. (see NATURAL HISTORY, p. 213). 

GEORGE A. WRIGHT, B.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. 

On Hip Disease in Childhood. Longmans and Co. 1887. 

On some forms of Abdominal Abscess in Children. Archives of Piediatrics. 1884. 
On the treatment of simple cases of Congenital Clubfoot. Med. Chron. 1884-5. 
On a case of Compound Fracture of the Humerus, treated by Resection and Wiring. 

Lancet. 1 884. 

On three cases of Trephining the Skull for Injury. Lancet. 1884. 
On Erasion of the Knee. Med. Chron. 1885. 
On a case of Cholecystotomy in which Renal and Biliary Calculi coexisted. Lancet. 

1885. 
On a case of Tuberculosis of the Kidney and Bladder. Nephrotomy, Cystotomy, 

Nephrectomy. Brit. Med. Journ. 1885. 
On some forms of Nasal Obstruction. Med. Chron. 1886. 
On Resection of the Tarsus as a substitute for Amputation in certain cases. Med. 

Chron. 1886. 

A case of Nephrolithotomy. Med. Chron. 1886. 
On a case of Ruptured Femoral Aneurism : Ligature of the Femoral Artery. Lancet. 

1886. 

Notes on some cases of Renal Calculus. Med. Chron. 1886-7. 
On a case of Rupture of the Spongy Urethra; Suture; Recovery. Lancet. 1887. 
On Hernia of the Caecum. Brit. Med. Journ. 1887. 

On some points in the management of the Hernia. Med. Chron. 1887-8. 
On a case of CEsophagotomy for the removal of an impacted tooth plate. Med. Chron. 

1887-8. 

On a case of Cirsoid Aneurism. Lancet. 1888. 
Splenectomy. Med. Chron. 1888-9. Ann. of Surgery. 1889. 
Notes on Renal Surgery. Med. Chron. 1888-9. 
Thyroid Asthma. Med. Chron. 1889-90. 
Notes from the Children's Hospital. Med. Chron. 1894. 
Affections of the Accessory Nasal Cavities. Med. Chron. 1894. 



243 



GEORGE A. WRIGHT, B.A., M.B., F.R.C.S. continued. 

Strangulated Hernia. Med. Chron. 1895. 

Renipuncture. Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 

Dermoid Cysts. Brit. Med. Journ. 1896. 

Intussusception of the Vermiform Appendix. 

Unsolved Surgical Problems. Med. Chron. 

Obscure Abdominal Conditions apparently requiring Operation. 

CEsophageal Pouches. Brit. Med. Journ. 1898. 

Articles on Acute Inflammation of Bone ; Tuberculosis of Bone ; Leontiasis Ossea. 

Keating 's Encyclopedia of Diseases of Children. Young J. Pen t 'land. 1899. 
And many other papers. 
(See also HENRY ASHBY and JOSEPH COLLIER.) 



Brit. Med. Journ. 
1897-8. 



1897. 
Practitioner. 1897. 



INDEX. 



An asterisk is placed against the names of former students of the College. 



Abney, Captain Sir William de Wive- 

leslie, K.C.B 179 

Abrahall, John Leigh Hoskyns . 136, 182 
Academic Year . . . 43, 93 
Acts of Parliament, Owens College, 

1870, 1871, 1899 . . . 7, 23 

Adam, Sir Frank Forbes . . 25 

Adams- Acton, John . . . 149, 151 
Adamson, Prof. Robert . 49, 52, 164 
Administration, College Government 

and 23, 28 

Agar, C. . -149 

Agnew, George William . . 25, 58 
Agnew, John Henry .... 142 

Agnew, William (Sir William Agnew, 
Bart.) ...... 147 

Alcock, Nathaniel Henry . . 95, 216 
Alexander, Prof. Samuel . 27, 49, 131 

Allen (? Joseph, 1769-1839) . .148 
Alvarez, William Thomas . . 91, 92 
Anatomy. . . -94, 156, 216-9 
Studies in, from Anatomical De- 
partment of Owens College, 216 note 
Anatomy, Morbid . . 101-5, 22 4~9 
Anti-Corn Law League Fund . . 52 
Arabic . . . . . 47, 48 

*Armitage, Rev. Elkanah . . . 154 
Arts, Science, and Law Department 43-92 
Ashburne House, Victoria Park (Hall 

of Residence for Women) . . 130 
Ashbury, James, sen. . . 62, 141 
Ashbury, James, jun. . . 62, 141 
Ashby, Henry .... 109, 229 

*Asher, Joseph Mayor . . .134 
Ashton, James Williamson, ist Baron 58 
Ashton, Thomas . . . 6, 119 
*Ashton, Thomas Gair ... 25 
*Ashworth, James Hartley . 72, 204, 207 
*Ashworth, James Reginald . 1 70, 1 7 1 
Assheton, Richard . . 73, 205, 217 
Assistant Lecturers of the College 
(see also under the various Depart- 
ments) ...... 24 



Associates, The, 149, 153-4; see also 7, 

24 note, 26, and 88. 

Associates, Women .... 88 
*Astbury, John Meir .... 86 
Aston, John Partington ... 28 
Portrait of . . . .148 
Athenaeum (see Manchester Athenaeum) 
Athletic Ground . . . 126, 127 
Athletic Union . . . .126 

Attendance at a College of the Uni- 
versity for Degree Courses . . 41 
*Auden, Harold Allden . . 182-3 



Bacteriology . . . 101-5, 22 4~9 
*Bagnall, Ernest Harold . . .183 
*Bailey, George Herbert . . 64, 183-4 

Bailey, John Eglington . . . i 
*Baker, Harry . . . 71, 135, 184 

Baker, Herbert Brereton . 

Baker, John Gilbert . 
*Bamford, Harry 

Baptist College, Brighton Grove 

Barker, Prof. Thomas 

Portrait of ... 

Bates, Harry .... 
*Bateson, Thomas 

Baxendell, Joseph 

Bazley, Sir Thomas, Bart. 
*Beard, John . , . . 

Beattie, Robert 

Beaumont, James William . 55, 127 

Bedford College for Women, London 21 
*Bedson, Prof. Peter Phillips . 70, 71, 184 
*Behrens, Edward . . . .25 

Benefactions, Indexed Record of . 29 

Benger, F. Baden . . . 142, 144 

Bennett, John Marsland . . 7 note 2 

Bentley, Alfred Thomas . . 44, 54 
*Bentley, William Henry . . 184-5 

*Bentz, Ernest . . . . 72 



189 

' "3 
18 

8 note, 54 
. 148 

147, IS' 
. 161 

199 

56 

205 

55 

55, 



'35, 



(') Mr. Henry Percival, Assistant Librarian of the College, has given considerable assistance in the 

compilation of the Index. 

LL 



Beyer, Charles Frederick 10, 14, 32, 33, 

62, 69 

Bust and Portraits of ii, 148 

Beyer Buildings . . . 14, 35, 36 
Beyer Fund ..... 32 
Beyer, Peacock and Co., Messrs. ii, 10 
Beyer Professorships . 53, 62, 73 

Biological Laboratories of Owens Col- 
lege, Studies from . . 73, 204 note 

*Birtwistle, George . . . -130 
Blaikley, Alexander . . . .149 
Blakeley, Robert Platt . 58, 134, 140 

*Blankenhorn, Ernst . . . .220 
Bleackley, Edward Overall . . 145 
files, David Samuel . . . .138. 

*Bles, Edward Jeremiah . . .210 
Bolton, Contribution to Extension 

Fund 6 

Bolton, Herbert . . 205-6, 209 

*fione,Wiiliam Arthur 64, 92, 136, 185, 195 

*Booth, Henry . . . . 195 

Botany . . . 74-5, 93, 204-216 
Botany, Pharmaceutical . . 74 

*Bott, William . . . ?I| 135 

*Bottomley, Leonard . . . .82 

* Bo war, Joshua . . . . .194 

*Bowtell, Norman Edwin . . .185 
Bracken bury, Miss Hannah . . 8, 97 
Bradbury, James Kinder ... 85 
Bradford, Miss Mary . . 51, 139 
Bradford, William . . .51, 139 

*Bradley, Francis Ernest ... 86 
Bradley, Samuel Messenger 73, 94, 107, 229 
Bradley, William . . . .148 
Brauner, Bohuslav . . . 135, 185 
Breymann, Prof. Hermann . 48, 157 
Bridge, Sir John Frederick . 86, 170 

*Brierley, Henry . . . . iii 

*Brierley, John Thomas . . .185 
Bright, The Right Hon. John . 52, 133 

*Brightmore, Prof. Arthur William 63, 135 
Bristowe, Vice-Chancellor Henry Fox 139 

*Broadfield, Edward John . 25, 26, 154 

Broadhurst, Edward Tootal 14 note, 25 

*Brockbank, Edward Mansfield . . 222 

*Brooke, Henry Ambrose Grundy 

no, 219, 229 
Brooks, John B. Close . . 14 note 

*Broome, Harold Holkar ... 94 
Brothers, Alfred . ii, 149, 151, 152 

*Brothers, Horace Edward . . . 202 
Brown, Ford Madox . . .147 
Brown, John Macdonald . . 95, 216 
Brown, W. Scott . . . 142, 144 



*Brownsword, Frank . 

Brunton, Thomas Lauder . 

Bryce, The Rt. Hon. James 8 
*Buckley, James Charles 

Buckley, John . 

Buckley, Samuel 

Buildings, College 

Bunsen, Prof. Robert Wilhelm 
*Bunting, Percy William 

Burgess, J. E. . 
*Burghardt, Charles Anthony 

Burke, John Benjamin Butler 

Bursar, Former . 

BURSARIES 

Schunck Bursaries 
*Bury, Ernest . 
*Bury, Judson Sykes . 

Bury, Robert Gregg . 
*Byne, Loftus St. George . 

Byrne, Thomas Francis 



. 187 

. 226 

note, 83, 85 

. 224 

140 

154 

35-6 

199 

154 
. 151 

78, 114,186 

13. I 7 l 

28 

137 
. 191 

. . 238 

I3 6 l6 4 

. 191 
82, 84 



*Cain, John Cannell . 183, 185, 187, 189 
Calvert, Frederick Grace . . . 144 
Calvert, Mrs. Frederick Grace . .119 
Campagnac, Ernest Trafford . .128 

*Campion, George Goring . . 113, 230 
Cancer Pavilion and Home . 17,116 
Capital of the College . . 29, 32 
Cardwell, H 148 

*Carnelley, Prof. Thomas . 71, 186-7, 2O1 
Carpenter, Henry Cort Harold . 64, 187 
Carpenter, William Lant . . .181 

*Carroll, Walter 78 

Cartwright, Francis . . . 144 

Carver, John Roberton . . 101, 224 
Cavendish, Spencer Compton (see 

Devonshire, 8th Duke of). 
Cavendish, Victor . . . .26 
Cavendish, William (see Devonshire, 

7th Duke of). 
Central Building . . . -35 

*Chadwick, Herbert C. 206 

*Chaffers, Sydney . . . . ii, 28 
Chairman of Council . 15,24,26 

Former Chairman ... 28 
Chalmers, Albert John . . 95,216 
Chalmers, Robert . . . .16 
Champion Eight . . . .127 
Chancellor of the Victoria University 38 
Chapman, David Leonard . 64, 187 

*Chapman, Sydney John . . .164 

*Cheetham, John Frederick . 25, 26 



247 



Chemical Laboratories ... 36 
Chemistry 4, 9, 64-72, 93, 140-1, 144, 

182-204 

Studies from . . . Chemical La- 
boratories of Owens College 1 70 note 
Chemistry, Higher Technical Organic 67 
Chemistry, Technological . . 7 2 

Cheshire, Members of Parliament for, 

on Court of Governors . 24 note, 26 

*Chorlton, James Dewsbury . 171, 174 

Christie, Prof. Richard Copley, 14, 18, 25, 

51, 52, 58, 83, 85, 117, 118, 153 

Portrait of . . . .118, 148 

Christie Library . . 18,36,117-8 

Christie Professor of Law . . 82 

Claisen, Prof. Ludwig . . 135, 187 

*Claparede, Alexandre . . . 202 

*Clarke, John Henry . . . .120 

Clarkson, Arthur .... 98 

Classics. . 43-5,137-8,143,157-160 

Classics, Honours School ... 43 

Clay and Son, Messrs. T. . . -36 

*Clegg, John Gray . . . .234 

Clegg, Neville . . . . 25, 26, 58 

Clifton, Charles, Bequest of . 10, 62 

Clifton, Prof. Robert Bellamy 58, 171, 199 

Portrait of . . . . . 148 

Clive, Archer Antony . . -85 
CLUBS COLLEGE (see also SOCIETIES, 
COLLEGE) 

Association Football Club . .126 
Cricket Club . . . .126 

Fives Club . . . . .126 

Hockey Club, Women's . 126, 127 
Lacrosse Club . . . .126 

Lawn Tennis Club . . .126 
Photographic Club . . . J 26 
Rugby Football Club . . .126 
Shooting Club . . . .128 

Swimming Club . . . .127 

Cobden Club Committee . . 1 39 

Cobden Lecturer in Political Economy 52 
Cobden Memorial Committee . 52, 139 
Cobden, Richard .... 4 

*Cohen, Julius Berend, 71, 187-8, 190, 195-6 
College Hospital Estate . . 17, 29 
College of Arts and Sciences, Man- 
chester ...... i 

College Tutor . . . 24, 28, 44 note 
College Union (see under Societies). 
Colleges of the Victoria University . 37 
Collier, Edward . . . .212 

*Collier, Joseph. . 95, 106, 113, 230 
*Collinson, Robert Whiteley . .188 



*Colman, Harold Govett . . .188 
Commissioners of the 1851 Exhibition 140 
Comparative Philology ... 43 
Constitution of the College . 7, 23 

Convalescent Hospital, Cheadle . 115 
Convocation of the Victoria University 39 

*Cooke, Miss Alice Margaret, 51, 86, 131,134, 

161-2 

*Cooke, George Harry . . .219 

*Cooper, Percy Robert . . .226 
Copinger, Prof. Walter Arthur, 27, 82, 162, 

169, 170 

Core, Prof. Thomas Hamilton 8 note, 27, 54 

Cotton, James Sutherland . . 85 

Council of the College . 7, 23, 24, 26, 

27, 28, 138, 148, 152 

Council of the Victoria L T niversity 38, 39 
Court of Governors of the College, 7, 23,24-6 
Court of the Victoria University . 38 

*Coutts, Francis James Henderson 

101, 202, 222, 227 
Crampton, Cecil Burleigh . . .121 

Crewe, Earl of 26 

Cricket Field ..... 34 

*Crompton, Miss Alice . . .128 

*Cross, Charles Frederick . . .188 

*Crossley, Arthur William . 136, 179, 188 
Crossley, William John . . 25, 58 

*Crow, John Kent . . . .188 
Crowther, Joseph . . . 71, 72 

*Cullingworth, Prof. Charles James 

108, 230, 231, 236 note 
Portrait of 148 

*Cunliffe, John William . . 136,160 



Daily Dispatch, The. . . .56 
*Dale, Richard Samuel . . .188 
Dalton, John . . . . I, 129 

Scholarships, etc., in memory of 

140, 141, 144 

Bust and Portraits of . . 118,148 

Dalton Hall . . . . 13, 129 

* Dancer, William . . . .189 

Darbishire, Charles James. . 84, 1 1 9 

Portrait of 149 

Darbishire, Otto Vernon . . 74, 206 

Darbishire, Robert Dukinfield ii, 7 note 2,14 

*Darling, William Howarth. . .189 

Darwin, Major Leonard . . .180 

*Davies, George William . . . 202 

*Davies, Samuel Henry . . .71 



( '48 ) 



Dawkins, Prof. William Boyd 

9,27,76,77,119,122,124,206-7 

Day, Robert 162 

Day Training College, Establishment of 

17, 18 

Accounts . . -3, 33 note m 
General description . . 78 

Dean of the Medical School (see under 

Medical Department). 

Debt of the College .... 30 
Deficit, Annual ... 31 

Degrees, Victoria University . 40-42 
Degree Courses, Cost of . . . 42 
De la Rue, Warren . . . .181 
Delepine, Prof. Auguste Sheridan 

27, 101, 224-6 

*Dendy, Arthur ..... 207 
Dental Anatomy and Physiology . 113 
Dental Department . . . 14, 112 
Dental Histology . . . .113 
Dental Mechanics . . . .113 
Dental Metallurgy . . . .114 
Dental Surgery and Pathology . 1 1 3 

Dental Surgery, Practical and Operative 113 
Department for Women, Establishment 
of . 9,86,87 

Accounts .... 30, 34 
Departmental Boards, Victoria Uni- 
versity . . . . -4 
Departmental Expenses, College 30, 34 
Derby, Edward Henry Stanley, I5th 

Earl of ... 133 

Derby, Frederick Arthur Stanley, i6th 

Earl of . . . . 25 

Derbyshire, Members of Parliament 

for, on Court of Governors 24 note, 26 
Devonshire, William Cavendish, 

7th Duke of . . . 7,11,16,28 
Portrait of . . . . 118, 149 
Devonshire, Spencer Compton 

Cavendish, 8th Duke of . 16, 18, 24 
*Dewhurst, Charles Bennett . . 59 
Dicey, Prof. Albert Venn ... 85 
Dictionary of National Biography . 5 1 
Diseases of Children . . . .109 
Disraeli, Benjamin, Earl of Beaconsfield 6 
Dittmar, Prof. William . . 70, 199 
Dixon, Prof. Harold Baily 

ii, 27,64, 148, 151, 189, 190, 193, 195 

*Dockray, John Smalley . . .226 

Dodd, Catherine Isabel . . 78,87, 168 

*Dodgson, William . . . .181 

Donner, Edward . . ii, 25, 26, 119 

*Dougan, Prof. Thomas Wilson . . 134 



Dover House . . . . 36, 125 
*Dowson, Edgar Enfield . . .183 
Dowson, Taylor, and Co., Messrs. . 63 
*Dreschfeld, Prof. Julius 

27, i5, J 54, 226, 231 

Urummond, Rev. Principal James . ii 

Dumville, Arthur William . 107, 142 

Dumville, Mrs. Arthur William. 107, 142 

Dunbar, D. . . . . 149 

*Dunkerley, Prof. Stanley . 63, 136, 171 

*Dunlop, Robert . . . 136, 162 

Durham College of Science, New- 

castle-on-Tyne . . . .21 
Durning-Lawrence, Sir Edwin, Bart. 

. ii, 46, 151 

Durn : ng-Lawrence, Lady . . 46, 151 

Dyce, William . . . .147 

Dyce, Mrs. William .... 147 

* Dyson, Gibson . . . .190 



Ear, Diseases of the . . . .no 

Early English Text Society . .138 
Eastham, John . . . . -151 

Ecclesiastical History . . . 50 
Ecclesiastical History, Bishop Fraser 

Lectureship in . . 51 

Economics and Economic History 

5 2 > 8 9, J 39, 164-8 
Ede, Freda Carline . . . .121 

Edkins, John Sydney . . . 98,219 
Education, College Department of 

18, 78-82, 169-170 

Education, Higher Commercial. 19, 88 

Education, Minister of -24 note 

Egerton of Tatton, Earl . . 25, 123 
Elborne, William . . .100, 222-3 
Elton, Oliver . . . 45, 91, 160 

*Emmott, Prof. George Henry . . 85 
Engineering (see also Whitworth Engin- 
eering Laboratory) 59-63, 141, 170-182 
England, Edwin Bourdieu 44, 129, 157, 160 
English Historical Review. . . 51 
English Language . 45-7, 138, 143, 160 
English Language, Smith Professor- 
ship of . . . . . .46 

English Literature 13, 45, 89, 138, 143, 160 
ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBI- 
TIONS 

Bleackley Scholarship . 145 

Burnley Corporation Technical 

Scholarship . . . 145 

Cartwright Scholarship . 144 



( 2 49 ) 



ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBI- 
TIONS continued. 
Cheshire County Council Scholar- 
ships ..... 146 
Grace Calvert Scholarship . -144 
Cumberland County Council 

Scholarships .... 146 
Dalton Scholarships . . .144 
Dauntesey Medical Entrance 

Scholarships .... 142 
Day Training Exhibitions . . 145 
Derbyshire County Council 

Scholarships . . . .146 
Durham County Council Scholar- 
ships ..... 146 
Alice Fay Exhibition . . 88, 145 
Folds Scholarship . . . 146 
James Gaskill Scholarships . 143 

Heginbottom Exhibition . . 146 
Hulme Scholarships . . 143 

Jones Entrance Scholarships 51, 139, 143 
Sir James Phillips Kay-Shuttle- 

worth Scholarship . . .143 
Lancashire County Council Com- 
mercial Scholarships . .146 
Lancashire County Council Musi- 
cal Scholarships . . .146 
Lancashire County Council 

Science Scholarships . .146 
McKerrnw Scholarship . . 145 
Manchester Corporation Techni- 
cal Scholarships . . .145 
Manchester Grammar School En- 
trance Scholarships . . . 145 
Hugh Mason Scholarship . 145 

Dora Muir Scholarship . .145 
Dcnnison Naylor Scholarships . 143 
Norfolk County Council Scholar- 
ships ..... 146 
Pharmacy Exhibition . . . 144 
John Platt Local Exhibitions . 146 
Ramsbottom Entrance Scholar- 
ship ..... 141 
Rogers Scholarship . . .143 
Rumney Scholarship . . .144 
Seaton Scholarship . . . 143 
William Simpson Exhibition . 145 
Somerset County Council Scholar- 
ships ..... 146 
Staffordshire County Council 

Scholarships .... 146 
Technical Science, Scholarship in 144 
Titus Tetlow Exhibition . . 146 
Theodores Exhibition . . . 143 



ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBI- 
TIONS continued. 

Thursby Scholarship . . .146 
University Entrance Scholarships . 133 
Whitaker Scholarship . . .146 
North Riding of Yorkshire County 

Council Scholarships . .146 
West Riding of Yorkshire County 

Council Scholarships . .146 
Evening Classes . . 5, 6, 90-92 
*Ewan, Thomas . . . 184, 190 
Expenditure, Annual College . 30-34 
Average per Student . . 3 1 

Total on account of Land, Build- 
ings and Appliances . . 33 note 
Extension Fund . . . 6, 29 



Fairbairn, Sir William, Bart. . . 141 
Fairfax, General (Sir Thomas) . . i 
Fairfax, Henry ..... i 
Faraday, Frederick James . ii, 149 
Faraday, Michael, Portrait of . . 149 
Faulkner, Benjamin Rawlinson . . 149 
Faulkner, Mrs. Elizabeth . 149, 150 

Faulkner, George, 2, 3, 4, 20, 28, 138, 151 
Portraits of . . . 149 

Faulkner, Samuel .... 3 
Fay, Mrs. Alice, Bequest of . . 145 
Fees . . . 30, 34, 42 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Bishop Berkeley Fellowships 13, 134 
John Harling Research Fellow- 
ship ... -134 
Honorary Research Fellowships . 137 
Jones Fellowship . . 51, 134 
Langton Fellowship . . -134 
University Fellowships . . 132 
Fiddes, Edward . . . . ii, 28, 45 
Fielden, Samuel .... 54 
Fielden, Mrs. Samuel . . 82 
Fielden Lectureship in Mathematics . 54 
Finance, College . . . 29-34 
Financial Needs of the College . 31 
Firth College, Sheffield . . .21 
Fischer, W. H. . . ii 
Fives Court ... 36 
Fletcher, Samuel . . . . 137 
Flux, Prof. Alfred William, 28, 52, 53, 01, 165 
Foard, James Thomas ... 86 

Folds, J 146 

Football, Association . . .127 
Football, Rugby . . . -127 



Ford, Edward Onslow . . 149 

Forensic Medicine . . . .108 

*Fortey, Miss Emily Comber . .191 

Foster, John Frederick, Portrait of . 149 

Fowler, George Herbert . 135, 207, 211 

*Fowler, Gilbert John 71, 72, 182, 184, 191 

Foxton, Mrs. Catherine Dauntesey 139, 142 

Frankland, Prof. Sir Edward, K.C.B. 4, 70, 

191 

Medallion and Portrait of . . 149 
Fraser, Alexander . . . 95, 216 
Fraser, Rt. Rev. James, 2nd Bishop 

of Manchester . . . 137 

Fraser, Mrs. Agnes . . 51, 137 

Fraser, Bishop, Lectureship in Eccle- 
siastical History . . . 51 
Freeman, Prof. Edward Augustus, 
Library of . . . . . 1 1 9 

Freer, Paul C 192 

French . . . -47, 48, 89 

Friends' Hall . . . . 13, 129 

*Frith, Julius 171 

Fuel ' 67 



Gadow, Hans . . . 135 

*Gamble, Frederick William 72, 91, 136, 207 
Gamgee, Prof. Arthur 

8 note 2, 93, 97, 219 note, 220 

Portrait of . . . 149 

*Gannon, William . . 59, 171, 180 

Gardner, W. H. . .72 

*Garner, Charles . 95 

Garstang, Walter . . .136, 207 

Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn (Mrs. 

William), Bust of . . 118, 149 
Gaskell, The Misses Margaret Emily 

and Julia Bradford . . 120, 149 

Gaskill, James . . . . 143 

Portrait of . . . 149 

*Gee, William Winson Haldane . 59, 171-2, 

182, 190 
General Board of Studies, Victoria 

University ..... 40 
General Hospital and Dispensary for 

Sick Children . . . 1 1 5 

General Management Expenses 30, 34 

Gent, John . . . . -85 
Geography, Physical . ... 76 
Geography, Political and Commercial 53, 

89, 168 

Geology . . 9, 76-78, 204-216 

Gerland, Balthasar William . . 70 



German . ... 47, 48, 90 

German, Henry Simon Professorship 

of 19 

Gibson, Rev. Canon Nicholas William 

7 note 2 

Gibson, Richard H. . . 58, 134, 140 

Giggleswick Grammar School . . 79 

*Gilbody, Alexander William . .192 

*Giles, Arthur Edward . . .208 

Gladstone, Murray ... 7 note 2 

Gladstone, The Rt. Hon. William 

Ewart 6 

Glascott, Charles Edward . . 109,231 
Goodall, Edwin . . . 105 

Goode, William Thomas ... 82 
*Goodwin, William . . . .192 
Government and Administration of 

the Cpllege . . . . 23, 28 

Governors of the College . . 24-26 

*Graham, Edward . . . .190 

Graham, John William . . .129 

Grant, Alexander ... 82, 84 

*Grant, James . . . . 1 88, 191 

GRANTS, ANNUAL 

From Government . .15, 16, 30, 
33 note A, 34 

From the Hulme Trustees, 13, 

33 note e, 34 

From the Incorporated Law 
Society of the United Kingdom 

33 note g, 34, 84 
From the Lancashire County 

Council . . 1 6, 33 note k, 34 
From the Manchester City 

Council . . 1 6, 33notey, 34 

From the Manchester Incorporated 

Law Association . 34 note b, 84 

Total amount of . . . 30, 34 

Greek . . _ . 13, 43 

Greek Testament Criticism . . 43-5 

Greenwood, Principal Joseph Gouge, 4, 5, 

8 note, 10, 15, 28, 44, 51, 158, 169 

Bust and Portraits of . . 118,149 

Greenwood Lectureship in Greek 

Testament Criticism ... 44 

drier, James .... 98, 223 

Griffith, Francis Llewelyn . . .91 

^Griffiths, Albert . . 59, 136, 172 

*Grimshaw, Harry . . . 71, 192 

*Grindley, John Henry . . 59, 172 

Grindon, Leopold Hartley . . 75 

Groves, William Grimble . . -58 

Guthrie, Prof. Frederick . . 70, 192 

Gwyther, Reginald B'elix . . 53, 172 



( 251 ) 



Gymnasium 
Gynaecology 



34, 36, 127 
1 08 



Hadley, Harry Edwin ... 59 

Hager, Herman . . 48, 119, 158 

Portrait of . . . . -150 

Hager Memorial Library . . .119 

*Hall, Isaac Walker . . . 95, 220 

Hall, Samuel ..... 85 

Halls of Residence . . 13,129-131 

Hall of Residence for Women, Ash- 

burne House ... 13, 130 
Hannay, James Ballantine . 71, 192 
Hardcastle, Edward ... 7 note 2 
*Harden, Arthur . 71, 172, 190, 192-3 
Hardie, James .... 107, 231 
Hardy, John Ray . . . 121, 208 
Hare, Prof. Arthur William . . 107 
Hargreaves, James . . . .141 
*Harker, John Allen . . 136, 190, 193 
Harling, John . . . 58, 134, 140 
Harmony and Musical Composition 86, 141, 

170 

*Harris, Thomas . 105, no, 154, 226-7 

Harrison, George Morley . . .108 

*Harsley, Fred . . .134, 135, 160 

Harter, James Collier . .148 

Hartog, Prof. Marcus Manuel 73, 75, 208, 

216 

*Hartog, Philip Joseph 64, 136, 191, 193 

*Haslam, George James ... 98 

*Haworth, Alfred . . 25, 26, 131 

*Haworth, The late Mrs. Alfred . .145 

*Haworth, Edward . 71, 136, 184, 194 

Haworth, John F. . . . 142, 144 

Haycraft, Prof. John Berry . . 242 

*Headridge, David . . 113,232 

*Headridge, John Parsons . . .114 

Heart, Diseases of the . . .in 

Heath, Frederick Ashton . 107, 232, 237 

Hebrew .... 47,48,138 

Hecht, Edward .... 86 

Heginbottom, George . . .140 

Trustees of . . . .146 

*Heinke, John Leathart . . .194 

*Hemsalech, Gustav . . . .180 

Herbertson, Andrew J. . . 53, 168 

*Herford, Prof. Charles Harold . 135, 160 

Herkomer, Hubert von . . 150, 152 

* Hewlett, Ernest Godfree Whitworth 1 35, 1 58 

Heywood, Charles James 

44, 120, 137, 138, 149 



Heywood, Elizabeth Salisbury (Mrs. 
Abel) 88 

*Hcywood, George Washington . . 86 
Heywood, James . . 2,118 

Heywood, Oliver . . . 137 

Hibbert, The Rt. Hon. Sir John 

Tomlinson, K.C.B. ... 26 
Hick, Thomas . . -75, 123, 208-9 
Hick Memorial Committee . -123 
Hicks, Rev. Canon Edward Lee 44, 119, 130 
Hickson, Prof. Sydney John 27, 72, 124, 209 

*Higgin, Alfred James . . .188 
Hiles, Henry . . . . 86, 170 

*Hiles, Miss Isa Lockyer . . . 209 
Hill, Matthew Davenport . . 73 
Hill, H 151 

*Hiraoka, Morisabro . . . .182 
Histology (see under Physiology) 
History 13, 50,51, 139, 143, 155 note 2, 

161-4 

*Hobson, Bernard . . 76, 121, 209 

*Hobson, John Thomas . . .194 
Hobson's Charity, Audenshaw . . 80 

*Hodgkinson, Alexander . . 110,232 

*Holden, Henry . ' . 135, 172, 173 

* Holder, Henry William ... 28 
Holland, Prof. Thomas Erskine . 85 
Holland, Thomas H. . . .136 

*Holme, Miss Ursula . . . 160 

Holt, Councillor Edward . . .127 
Holt Gymnas\um(see under Gymnasium) 

*Holt, Wilmot 194 

Honours Schools, Victoria University 12, 

3', 4'-2 

*Hooton, William Arthur . . .113 
*Hopkins, Wilfred Beechey . .184 
*Hopkinson, Principal Alfred 

n, 19, 24,27,82,85, 154 

*Hopkinson, Charles . . 154 

*Hopkinson, Edward. . 26, 140, 154 

Hopkinson, Alderman John . . 25 

*Hopkinson, John . . 19, 56,'58, 154 

Portrait of . . . . 118, 150 

Hopkinson, John, Electro-Technical 

Laboratory . . . . 19, 56, 58 
*Hopwood, Edgar Oswald . . .219 
Home, Robert Main . . 98, 220 
Hoseason, James Henry . . 100, 223 
Hospitals for Clinical Instruction . 115 
Houldsworth, Sir William Henry, 

Bart. ... 7 note 2, 25, 130 
*Howarth, William James . . . 227 

* Howies, Fred . . . . .203 
*Hoyle, William Evans . 95, 121, 209 



( 252 ) 



*Hughes, Alfred . ii 

*Hughes, Charles . . . 154 

Hulme Grammar School, Oldham . 80 
Hulme Hall . . . . 13, 129 
Hulme Professor of Greek . 43, 44 
Hulme Trust, 13, 30, 33 note c, 34, 44, 129, 

143 

Hulme Trustees (see Hulme Trust). 
Humphreys, Sarah .... 2 
Hunt, Richard Thomas . . .109 
*Hurst, Charles Herbert . 73, 210, 211 
*Hutton, Robert Salmon . . -55 
Huxley, The Rt. Hon. Thomas 
Henry 8 



Income, Annual College . . 3~34 
Average per student . . 31 
Income for the session 1898-99 34 
(See also Temporary Special 

Income FundX 
Incorporated Law Society of the 

United Kingdom . 33 note^, 34, 84 
Italian Literature .... 90 



Jack, Prof. William . 
Portrait of . 

Jackson, John . 

Jacob, Lionel . 
*Jameson, Alexander Hope 
*Jeans, Miss Victorine 
*Jekyll, William Robert . 
*Jerdan, David Smiles 



58 
. 150 

'S 2 

ii 

136 

165 

194 
i, 185, 194 



Jevons, Prof. William Stanley, 8 note, 44, 
49. 5 2 > 54, i37> 165-7 
Bust of . . . 1 1 8, 150 

Jevons Professorship of Political 

Economy . . . . 52 

Johannson, Prof. Arwid . 28, 47, 158 

*Johnson, John Mountfort . . 227 

Johnson, Richard . . -57, 148 

* Johnston, John Haslam . .184 
Jones, Francis . . . . .71 
Tones, Harry Longueville ... 2 

* Jones, Robert Henry . . .194 
Jones, Prof. Thomas 

iv, 26, 27, 106, 107, 232 
Jones, Thomas Edward, Bequest of 

S' r 34, 139 

Jordan, Thomas, Portrait of . .150 
*Joule, Benjamin Arthur . . 151 



Kastner, Prof. Victor . . 27, 47, 48 
*Kay, James Taylor . . . 120, 170 
*Kay, William Edward . . 194 

Kay-Shuttleworth, Sir James Phillips, Bart. 

143 
Kay-Shuttleworth, The Rt. Hon. Sir 

Ughtred James, Bart. . 25,123,143 
Keeble, Frederic William . . 75, 207 

*Kelynack, Theophilus Nicholas 105, 227 
Kendall, Percy Fry . . . 78, 135 
Kennedy, Sir William Rann . . 85 
Kennington, Thomas Benjamin. 148, 150 
Kent, Albert Frank Stanley . . 98 
Kenyon, James .... 26 

*Kerr, William James . . . 228 
King, Alderman John, jun. . 25 

*King, Alfred John . . 154, 184 

King, John Edward . . . 25 

Kingdon, Francis . 59 

King's College, London ... 20 

*Kipping, Prof. Frederic Stanley 70, 197 
Kirkby, William . . . 98, 223 
Kitchin, Very Rev. George William, 
Dean of Durham . . ii 



Lacrosse . . . . . .127 

Lallemand, Prof. J. F. Henri . . 48 
*Lamb, Prof. Horace. . . 27, 53, 173 
*Lamb, Thornton Charles . . .184 
Lancashire, Members of Parliament 

for, on Court of Governors 24 note, 26 
Lancashire County Council 

Representation on Court 23 note, 26 
Grants from . 16, 33 note k, 34 
Scholarships . . . 146 

Subscription to Physical Labora- 
tory Fund .... 58 

Lancashire Independent College . 18 
Lancaster Royal Grammar School . 80 
Langton, William . . . 134, 150 
Langworthy, Edward Ryley . . 57 
Langworthy, Mrs. Edward Ryley . 127 
Langworthy Professorship of Physics 57 
Larmor, Alexander . . . 135, 1 73 
*Larmuth, Leopold . . . 220, 221 
Larynx, Diseases of the . . .no 
Lascelles, John .... 85 

Latin . . . 13, 43 

Latter, Oswald Hawkins . . 135, 210 
Law .... 82-6, 89, 139 

Law, Commercial .... 89 

Lawn Tennis . . . . .127 



253 



Lawrence, Sir Edwin Burning (see 

Burning- Lawrence). 

Lawrence.William Matthew Trevor 64, 195 

*Lea, Arnold William Warrington 108, 232 

Leach, Arthur Francis ... 85 

*Lean, Bevan . . 71, 136, 195, 197 

Lecture Courses, Cost of . . . 42 

Lecturers of the College (see under 

the various Departments) 
Lecturers of the Victoria University . 39 
*Ledward, Archibald Prentice . -154 
Lee, Rt. Rev. James Prince, ist Bishop 
of Manchester . . 118, 138 

Bust of . . . . 118, 150 
Lee, Mrs. Susan . . . -138 
*Leech, Prof. Baniel John 26, 27, 98, 100, 
106, 142, 144, 154, 223-4, 233 
*Lees, Charles Herbert 

54, 136, 173, 174, 180, 193 

*Lees, Frederic Herbert . . -195 

Leifchild, Henry Stormont . . 151 

Levinstein, Ivan 25, 26, 58, 67, 68, 141 

Library, Bescription of, . . 117-120 

Accounts ... 30, 34, 120 

*Lidbury, Frank Austin . . -187 

Little, Bavid .... 109, 233 

Liveing, Prof. George Bowning . 16 

Loewy, Benjamin . . . .181 

Lomax, James ..... 209 

Lomax, Miss . . . . -123 

Lonsdale, James . . . .148 

Lord President of the Privy Council, 

24 note, 26 
Lome, Marquis of (now gth Buke of 

Argyll) 26 

Lund, Prof. Edward, 8 note 2, 94, 107, 233 
Portrait of . . . .150 



'95 
128 



*McBougall, Arthur . 

*McBougall, Sidney . 
Mackenzie, Prof. John Stuart 49, 52, 167 

Mackinnon, James Bouglas . . 63 
McLaren, Rev. Alexander . . 25 

Maclure, The Very Rev. Edward 

Craig, Bean of Manchester . . 26 
McNeile, Rev. Archibald Patrick. . 54 
Magazine, Owens College . .125 

*Maguire, Robert . . . 105, 228 
Manchester Academy . . i, 2 

Manchester Association for Promoting 

the Higher Education of Women . 87 
Manchester Athenaeum . 2 



Manchester City Council . . 10 

Representation on Court 23 note, 25 
Grants from . 16, 33 note/', 34 

Technical Scholarships . 16, 145 
Manchester College, Oxford . 2 note 
Manchester Corporation (see Man- 
chester City Council). 

Manchester County Court . 4 note i 
Manchester Courier, The . . .56 
Manchester Bay Training College for 
Elementary Schools (see Bay Train- 
ing College). 

Manchester Geographical Society, 
Grant from ..... S3 

Manchester Geological Society . 9, 121 
Manchester Goethe Society . . 119 
Manchester Grammar School . 2, 145 
Mancliester Guardian, The . . 56 
Manchester High School for Girls 79, 87 
Manchester Hospital for Biseases of 
the Ear . . . . 115 

Manchester Incorporated Law Associ- 
ation .... 34 note b, 84 

Manchester Literary and Philosophical 
Society. ..... i 

Manchester Medical Society, Library 
of . . . . . 8, 1 1 4 

Manchester Municipal Technical 

School, Arrangement with the . 19 
Manchester Museum (see under Museum). 
Manchester Natural History Society 

6, 9, 121, 123 

Manchester New College . . 2 

Manchester Royal Eye Hospital . 115 
Manchester Royal Infirmary 

17, 88, 112, 115 

Manchester Royal Institution . . 2 
Manchester and Salford College for 

Women . 87, 88 

Manchester Southern Hospital for 

Women and Children . . .116 
Manchester Statistical Society . . 2 
Manchester University Settlement . 128 
Manchester Working Man's College . 5 
Mann, Prof. John Bixon 27, 108, 226, 

233-4 

*Mark, Harry Thiselton . . 78, 169 
*Marsden, Richard Walter . . .228 
Marshall, Prof. Arthur Milnes 

13. 73. "9. I2 7. 148, 210, 211 

Portrait of . . . .15 

Marshall Gold Medal . . -127 

Marshall Library and Library Fund 73, 119 

*MarshaH, Charles Frederic . .211 

MM 



254 



Martineau, Rev. James ... 2 
Mason, Hugh ..... 145 
*Mason, William .... 63 
Mason Science College, Birmingham 21 
Mason University College, Birmingham 21 
Master-Whitaker, Mr. and Mrs. Alfred 146 
Materia Medica . 98-100, 222-224 
Mathematics . 53,54, 140, 144, 170-182 
Mather, William . . 25, 26, 58, 140 
Mather and Platt, Messrs. . 15, 62 
Matheson, Leonard . . . 113,234 
Mattinson, George . . . .120 
Maunder, Edward Walter . .180 
Maurice, Rev. Frederick Denison 5 

Measham, Henry . . . -151 
Medical Department, 8, 14, 17, 22, 36, 93- 

116 

Accounts . . 30, 3 1, 33 note c, 34 
Dean of Medical School 24 note 2, 93 
Former Deans of Medical School 93 
(See also Royal Manchester School 

of Medicine). 

Medicine. . . 105-6,142,229-243 
*Melland, Brian . . . .211 
Melvill, James Cosmo . 26,27,211-2 
Mental Diseases . . . .no 
Menzies, James Acworth . . 98,221 
Metallurgy . . . . 64, 67, 72 
Meteorological Observatory . 56, 58 
Millar, John Bell . . . 59, 174 
Milligan, William . . 110,234-5 

Milner, Samuel Roslington. . 55, 174 
Milroy, John Alexander ... 98 
*Miniati, Theodore . . . -195 
Mining School . . . . 9, 77 

Modern Languages and Literatures, 47, 138, 



*Moorby, William Henry 
*Moore, Frederick Craven . 



. 63, 174 
. 101, 228 
Moore, John B. Gunning ... 85 
Mond, Ludwig. . . . 25,58 

Moravian College, Fairfield . . 18 
Morell, John Daniel . . . -5,17 
Morgan, Prof. John Edward, 8 note 2, 10, 

106, 235 

Portrait of ..... 150 

Morgan, Thomas Matthew . .196 

*Morton, Edward Handfield . . 203 

Moris' School Foundation, Leigh . 80 

Mottram - in - Longdendale Free 

Grammar School .... 80 
Mould, George William . . .110 
Muir, Alexander .... 145 
Muir. John Ramsay Bryce . . 51 



Muir, Matthew Moncrieff Pattison, 71, 196, 

203 

Muirhead, Prof. James, Library of 84, 118 
Mullins, Edwin Roscoe . . -150 
Munro, Prof. Joseph Edwin Crawford, 52, 

83, 85, 167 

Portrait of . . . . 150 

Murray, Harold . . . .121 
Museum, The Manchester, 9, 14, 35, 36, 75, 

121-4 

Accounts . . 30, 32, 33, 34, 124 
Lectures . .124 

Special Collections . 122-3 

Music (see under Harmony and Musical 

Composition). 
Myers- Ward, Charles Frederick 98, 221 



Natural History . . . 204-216 
Laboratories . 14 

Prize ...... 141 

(See also Zoology, Botany, and 

Geology.) 
Natural History Society(.swManchester 

Natural History Society). 
Naylor, Miss Anna Jemima . . 143 
Neild, Alfred . 7 note 2, 15, 25, 27, 28 
Portrait of . . . . 118, 150 

Neild, Theodore . . . .129 

Neild, William 28 

Neill, Robert . ... 6 

Neill and Sons, Messrs. Robert . 36 
Nether Knutsford Grammar School . 80 
New Buildings Committee of 1865-7 6 
*Newett, Miss Mary Margaret . 134 

Newman, Prof. Francis William . 2 
Nicholson, James Holme . . 28, 120 
Portrait of . . . . -150 
Niven, James .... 109, 235 
Noble, Matthew . . . -150 
Northern University . . . . i 



Oats, Henry Carne . 
Obstetrics 

*Oddy, Robert Walter 
Oldham, Henry Yule 



1 20 
108 
188 
53, 168 



Oldham (Town of), Contributions to 

Extension Fund .... 6 
Ophthalmology . . . .109 
Oriental Languages . . . 47, 138 
'Ormandy, William Reginald 136, 190, 196 



255 



*O'Shea, Lucius Trant . . .187 
Owen, Sidney George . . 45, 158 
Owens, John . . . . . 2, 3 
Medallion and Statue of . 150, 151 
Owens, John, Trust Rind. . 3, 32 

Owens, Owen ..... 2 
Portrait of . . . -IS 1 
Owens Trustees, Chairman of the . 28 
Owens Trustees at Date of Recon- 
struction of College . . 7 note 2 
Owens College, History of the . .1-21 
Relation with the Victoria University 

10-12, 37-42 
Representation on University Court 

38 note i 

Representation on University Council 

39 note 

Owens College Act, 1871 . . 7, 23 

Owens College Act, 1899 . . 7, 23 

Owens Extension College ... 7 
Owens Extension College Act, 1870 7, 23 
Oxford Historical Atlas, Poole's . 51 



Paget, Charles Edward . . . ICQ 

*Pankhurst, Richard Marsden . 153 

Partington, Captain Edward . 25, 58 

Partington, John H. E. . . 149, 150 

*Paterson, Prof. Andrew Melville 

95, 113, 216-7 

Paterson, W. E. . 54 

Pathology . . . 101-5, 224-9 
Patten, George . . . -149 
*Peace, Thomas Arthur . . 135 

Percival, Henry . . . 1 1 7 

Perkin, Prof. William Henry, jun. 

27, 6 4, 183-5, 187-8, 192, 194-7 

Perrin, John Beswick . . 95, 217 

Perry, Father Stephen Joseph . . 182 

*Peterkin, James Dysart . . .190 

Pharmaceutical Department 

14, 98-100, 114, 142, 144 
Pharmacology . . . 98-100, 222-4 
Philips, William Morton . . -25 
Philology (see a/so under various 

Languages) . . . 157-160 

Philosophy . . . .49, 164-8 
Physical Colloquium . . -57 
Physical Institute ; see under Physical 

Laboratories, New 

Physical Laboratories, New (some- 
times designated Physical Institute) 

19, 3, 3i, 3S 36, 55-S 8 



Physics . . 54-59, 93, 140, 170-182 
Studies from Physical . . . Labora- 
tories of Owens College 1 70 note 
Physiology . . 95, 142, 219-222 
Studies from Physiological Labora- 
tories of Owens College . 219 note 

Pickles, John W 59 

*Pierce, Frederick Morrish . -154 

Platt, John 146 

Platt, Mrs. John . . . .146 

*Platt, John Edward . . . .232 

Platt, Robert . . -97, 142 

Portrait of . . . -151 

Platt, Mrs. Robert . . . 88, 151 

Platt Bros., Ltd., Messrs. ... 58 

Platt Scholarship Fund . . . 142 

Plummer, Henry Crozier Keating . 53 

Podevin, A 4, 48 

Political Economy . . 52, 89, 139 
Free Public Lectures . . 52 
Prizes ..... 52 
Professorship Fund . . 139 

(See also Economics.) 

Political Science .... 89 
Pollard, Henry Bargman . . 136, 212 
*Pomfret, Henry Waytes . . 136, 224 
Popular Lectures ... 34, 90 
Portraits in the possession of the Col- 
lege I47-I5 2 

*Potts, Miss Thirza . . . -117 
*Poynting, Rev. Charles Thomas . 154 
*Poynting, Prof. John Henry 59, 174, 175 
*Pratt, Miss Edith Mary . . .212 
Preliminary Examination, Victoria 

University ..... 40 

President of the College . . 7, 23-26 

Former President . . 7, 16, 28 

*Preston, Charles Henry . . 113 

* Priestley, John . . . 98, 220, 221 

Principal of the College 

ii, 7, 23, 24, 26, 131, 138 
Former Principals . 4, 5, 15, 19, 28 
PRIZES 

David S. Bles Hebrew Prize . 138 
Classical Prize . . . -138 
Cobden Prizes . . . 52, 139 
Cobden Club Prizes . . .139 
Dalton Natural History Prize . 141 
Dumville Surgical Prize . 107, 142 
Early English Text Society's 

Prize 138 

English Essay Prize . . .138 
English Poem Prize . . .138 
Fairbairn Engineering Prize . 141 



( 256 ) 



PR IZES continued. 

Bishop Lee, Senior and Junior, 

Greek Testament Prizes . . 138 
Pharmacy Prize . . . 142 

Samuel Robinson Modern Lan- 
guages Prize . . . .138 
Shakspere Prize . . .138 
New Shakspere Society's Prize . 138 
Technical Applications of Electri- 
city Essay Prize . . .140 
Vice-Chancellor of the County 

Palatine of Lancaster's Prizes . 139 

Warburton Essay Prize . .139 

Procter, Daniel, Legatees of the late 17, 105 

Procter Professorship of Pathology 17, 105 

Professors of the College (see Senate). 

Professors of the Victoria University 39, 40 

Public Health, Department of, 14, 101, in 

Lectures . . . . .109 



Queen, Her Majesty the, Visitor of the 
University . . . . -37 
Gift from . . . . 18, 88 



*Radcliffe, Frank . . . .228 

Raleigh, Prof. Walter Alexander . 47 

Ramsbottom, John .... 141 

Ransome, Prof. Arthur 108, 109, 226, 235-6 

Rawson, Alderman Harry . . 25 

Rawson, Henry . . . .52 

* Ray ner, Edwin . . . . 153 

*Read, Arthur Avery . . . -197 

Record of Original Publications by 

Members of the College . 155-243 

Refectory ..... 34 

Registrar of the College . . 24, 28 

Former Registrars . . .28 

Renshaw, Joshua William . . 97, 142 

*Renshaw, Knowles . . . .228 

*Renshaw, Sidney . . . .142 

Respiratory Organs, Diseases of the . no 

*Revay, Georg ..... 197 

*Reynolds, Ernest Septimus . . 1 1 1 

Reynolds, Prof. Osborne 

8 note, 15, 27, 59, 60, 175-178 

Rhodes, Ernest Wood . . 134, 1 60 

*Rhodes, Walter Eustace ii, 117, 134, 162 

*Rhodes, William Gould ... 59 

*Rhodes, William Henry . . 154 

Richardson, John .... 54 



Richardson Lectureship in Mathe- 
matics ...... 54 

*Richmond, James .... 226 
Roberts, David Lloyd . . 1 08, 236 
Roberts, Prof. Sir William 

8 note 2, 1 06, 236-7 

Robertson, Edmund ... 85 
Robinow, Max Emil . . .123 
Robinson, Arthur . . 95, 217, 219 
Robinson, John ... 7 note 2 
Robinson, Samuel . . . 119, 138 
Robinson, Smith Phillips . . -5* 

*Rodgers, Charles . . . 171 

Rogers, Henry . . . . 143 

Rogers, Mrs. Henry .... 143 

Roscoe, Prof. Sir Henry Enfield, 4, 8 note, 

10, 26, 58, 68, 70, 157, 197-200 

Portrait and Medallion of . . 151 

*Rose, John Leonard . . .183 
Ross, Prof. James . . 106, 237-8 

*Rothwell, Thomas Andrew . .228 
Rothwell, Councillor William Thomas 52 

*Routledge, Robert .... 200 
Rowley, Charles, jun. . . 147 

Royal Geographical Society, Grant from 53 
Royal Infirmary . . . .17 
Royal Lunatic Hospital at Cheadle . 115 
Royal Manchester School of Medicine 

and Surgery . . . . i, 2, 6, 8 
Rumney, Robert . . . .144 
Ruskin, John, Sketches by . . 147 

*Russell, Edward John 64, 92, 190, 200 

Russell, William James ... 70 

Rutherford, William .... 36 

Rylands, John ..... 69 

Portrait of . . . . .151 

John Rylands Library . . 21 

Rylands, Mrs. John . . . .21 



St. Mary's Hospital . . . 115 

Salford . . . . . .16 

Salford, Council of the Borough of 

23 note, 26 

Sandeman, Prof. Archibald . 4, 54, 58 
Portrait of . . . . 151 

Sanskrit ...... 43 

Sargent, Arthur John . . 50, 53, 90 
Schola Episcopi . . . .18 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBITIONS (see 
also ENTRANCE SCHOLARSHIPS AND 
EXHIBITIONS) 
John Henry Agnew Scholarship 142 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND EXHIBITIONS 

continued. 

Ashbury Exhibitions . . .141 
Ashbury Scholarship . . .141 
Bradford Scholarship . . 51, 139 
John Bright Scholarship . 46, 133 
John Buckley Scholarship . .140 
Dalton Chemical Scholarships 69, 140 
Dalton Mathematical Scholarship 140 
Dauntesey Legal Scholarships . 139 
Dauntesey Medical Entrance 

Scholarships .... 142 
Derby Scholarship . . 133 

Exhibition (1851) Scholarships . 140 
Bishop Fraser Scholarships . 137 

Gilchrist Scholarship . . 133 

Hargreaves Musical Exhibition . 141 
John Harling Scholarship . 58, 140 
Heginbottom Scholarship . . 140 
Oliver Heywood Scholarship . 137 
Levinstein Exhibition . 69, 141 

Mercer Scholarship . . . 133 
Robert Platt Physiological 

Exhibitions . . . 97, 142 
Robert Platt Physiological 

Scholarships . 97, 142 

Sidney Renshaw Exhibition 97, 142 
Shakspere Scholarship . 46, 138 

Shuttleworth History Exhibition 139 
Shuttleworth Scholarship . -139 
William Summers Scholarship . 133 
Trevithick Scholarship . . 141 
Turner Medical Scholarship . 142 
University Scholarships . 132-133 
Victoria Scholarship . . 137 

Walters Scholarship . . .138 
Wellington Scholarship . .138 
Woodiwis Exhibition . . 69, 140 
Schorlemmer, Prof. Carl 

9, 68, 70, 71, 188, 192, 199-201 

Portrait of . . . . 1 5 1 

Schorlemmer Laboratory . . 64, 65, 68 

Schunck, Henry Edward 25, 69, 137, 199 

Schunck Bursaries . . . 137 

*Schuster, Prof. Arthur 

26, 27, 54, 59, !4, 178-180, 199 

Schwabe, Edmund Salis . . 119 

Scott, Principal Alexander John 

4,5,28,44, 46,48,49, 1 1 8, 149, 1 55 note i 

Bust of . . . -151 

Scott, Rev. Caleb . . . .25 

Scott, Charles Prestwich . . .25 

Seaton, James . . . . 143 

Seaton, Prof. James Stuart 27, 82, 84, 86 



Secretary to the Council and Senate . 28 
Sedbergh Grammar School . . 80 
Senate, The . . .7, 23, 24, 26, 27 
Senate at date of reconstitution of 

College .... 7 note 2 
Senates of 1862-3 ar| d of 1872-3, 

photographs of . . 151 

Sessions, Winter and Summer, Medical 93 
Shakspere Society, New . . .138 
*Shaw, Frederick William . . . 201 
*Shaw, Saville ..... 201 
*Shaw, William Arthur . . 135, 162-3 
*Sheldon, Charles . . . '54 
Shuttleworth, Elizabeth (Mrs. John) . 139 
Shuttleworth, John . . . .139 
Shuttleworth Scholarship Fund . 139 

Sidgwick, Alfred . . 49, 135, 168 
*Sidebotham, Edward John . 101, 216 

*Simcock, James .... 228 
*Simmons, Rev. Lawrence Mark iv, 47, 158 
Simon, Henry . . . 19, 48, 58 

Simon, Henry, Professorship of Ger- 
man . . . . . 19,48 
Simpson, Henry . . 105, 106, 238 
*Sims, Thomas Hoyle . . .201 
*Sims, William Edgar . . 193-4 

Sinclair, Prof. William Japp 27, 108, 238 
Site of the Owens College . . 35 

Skin Diseases . . . . .no 
*Smallman, Arthur Briton ... 95 
*Smith, Harry Wood . . . .190 
*Smith, Henry Arthur . . .71 
Smith, James Cruickshanks . . 45 
Smith, Miss Jemina Durning . 46, 151 
Smith, John Benjamin ... 46 

Bust of 151 

Smith, John Benjamin, Professorship 

of English Language ... 46 

*Smith, John William . . 95, 218 

*Smith, Norman .... 200 

Smith, Robert Angus . . 119,199 

Bust of . . -i5' 

*Smith, Watson . . . .71,72,202 

Smith, Prof. William 8 note 2, 97 

*Smithells, Prof. Arthur 70, 71, 200 note, 202 

Smithies, William Thomas . -123 

Snape, Alderman Thomas . . 26 

*Snape, Prof. Henry Lloyd . . 70 

SOCIETIES, COLLEGE (see also CLUBS, 

COLLEGE) 

Biological Society . . i*5 
Browning Society . . .126 
Catherine Wheel Society . .126 
Chemical Society . . . 125 



( '58 ) 



SOCIETIES, COLLEGE continued. 

Debating Society . . 125 

Debating Society for Women 

Students . . . . 125 
Engineering Society . . 125 

Historical Society . . .126 
Literary Society . . -125 
Medical Students' Debating 

Society . . -125 

Owens College Christian Union 

(Men) . -125 

Owens College Christian Union 

(Women) . . . .126 

Owens College Union . 34, 125 

Owens College Women's Union 125 

Philosophical Society . .126 

Shakspere Society . . -125 

Somers, Alexander . . . .100 

*Southam, Frederick Armitage 

106, 107, 151, 238 

Southam, Prof. George 8 note 2, 93, 107 
Portrait of . . 151 

Southern and Sons, Messrs. William . 36 
Spanish Literature .... 90 
Special Income Fund (see Temporary 

Special Income Fund). 
Spencer, Reuben . . . .123 
*Spencer, Prof. Walter Baldwin . .211 
Sprankling, Charles Henry Graham 

185,197 

Staffurth, Henry . . . .86 

Standen, Robert . . 121, 208, 211-2 

Stanley Grove Estate . . 17 

*Stanton, Prof. Thomas Ernest . 63, 180 

*Stapley, Alfred Martin . . 135 

*Staub, Adolf 202 

Steell, Graham. . 105, in, 239 

Steggall, Prof. John Edward Aloysius 54 
*Steinthal, Alfred Ernest . . 86, 1 54 
Stephen, Miss Helen Margaret . .130 
Stephens, Thomas Albertus . . 47 
Stewart, Prof. Balfour 

8 note, 58, 155 note i, 180-2 

Portrait of . . . 151 

Stewart, Prof. George Neil . 98, 221 

*Stewart, Robert Wallace . . 174 

Stipends . ... 30, 34 

Stirling, Prof. William . 27, 95, 221-2 

Stockport Grammar School . . 80 

*Stoehr, Miss C. Helene . . .128 

Stone, Daniel . . . . .71 

Strachan, Prof. John . 27, 43, 158, 159 

*Strange, Edward Halford . . .190 

*Stroud, Prof. William . .172, 182 



Students, Number of, at the Owens 

College . . . . .22 
STUDENTSHIPS 

Gilchrist Travelling Studentship 132 

Honorary Research Studentships 137 

Jevons Studentship . . . 137 

Sudborough, John Joseph . 197, 203 

*Suguira, Shegetake . . 184, 188, 203 

Summers, William Coventry . 43, 159 

Surgery .... 106, 229-243 

*Swanwick, Frederick Tertius . 53, 91 

Swinnerton, J. W. . . . 148, 149 

*Syme, William Blair .... 202 



*Tait, James . . 47, 50, 91, 120, 163 
Tait, Prof. Peter Guthrie . .182 

*Takamatsu, Toyokichi . . . 202 
Tanner, Thomas . . . 113 

Tate, A. L. . .148 

Tatham, John Francis Walkingame 109, 239 
Taylor, Alfred Edward . 43, 49, 91, 168 

*Taylor, James ... 72 

Taylor, John Edward . . 7 note 2 
Teaching Staff, Stipends and Fees . 30 
Technical Instruction Acts . . 6, 16 
Temporary Special Income Fund 

3> 3 1 . 33 note 4 34 
Terms, Duration of College (see also 
Sessions, Winter and Summer, etc.) 
*Terry, Hubert Lanphier . . .172 
Tetlow, Titus, Trustees of . .146 
Theodores, Prof. Tobias 

4, 8 note, 48, 119, 143, 159 

Portrait of . . . -152 

Theodores, Sarah (Mrs. Tobias) . 143 

Theological Colleges, Relations with . 18 

Therapeutics . . . 98-100, 222-4 

Thomas, E 127 

Thomasson, John Pennington . 25, 58 
Thompson, Frederic . . 85 

^Thompson, Alderman Joseph 

iii, i, 10, 15, 24, 25, 155 note i 

*Thompson, Peter. . . . 94, 218 

*Thomson, Prof. Joseph John . . 63 

Thorburn, Prof. John . . 1 08, 239 

Portrait of 152 

*Thorburn, William . 26, 106, 154, 240 

Thornycroft, Hamo . . . -149 

Thorpe, Jocelyn Field 64, 185, 197, 203 

*Thorpe, Thomas Edward 70, 71, 154, 200, 

201, 203 
Thursby, Sir John Hardy, Bart. . 146 



( '59 ) 



Thursby, Rev. William . . .146 
Toller, Prof. Thomas Northcote 26, 27, 45, 

47, 5 1 . l61 

*Tout, Mary (Mrs. T. F.) . 
Tout, Prof. Thomas Frederick 



Toxicology 

Treasurer of the College 

Former Treasurer 
Trevithick, Richard . 
Tropical Diseases 
Trust Funds 
Tufnell, C. J. . 
Turner, Charles 
Turner, Thomas 



'34, 163 
", 27, 5, 
163-4 
. 108 
7, 15, 24, 26 
28 

. 411 
. in 

3, 32, 33 
70 

. 148 
. i, 2, 8, 142 



Turner's, J. M. W., Liber Studiorum . 147 
Turpin, George Sherbrooke . 136, 204 



*Udall, William ... .203 

University (see Victoria University) 
University College, Aberystwyth . 21 
University College, Bangor . . 21 
University College, Bristol . . 21 
University College, Cardiff . . 21 
University College, Dundee . . 21 
University College, Liverpool, n, 21, 37, 
38 note i, 39 note 
University College, London 
University College, Nottingham 
University College, Sheffield 
University Colleges . 
University of Birmingham 
University of Durham 
University of London 
University of Wales . 
University Extension Lectures . 
University Settlement 
Unitarian Home Missionary College. 18 



20 
21 
21 

20, 21 

21 

i note 2 

2, II, 20 
21 

37,90 
128 



Valgimigli, Azeglio . . 91, 92, 159 

Vernon, Mrs. Venables . . .119 
Vickers, Henry .... 36 

Victoria Dental Hospital . . 112, 116 
VICTORIA UNIVERSITY 

Creation of . . . . i o- 1 1 
Its three Constituent Colleges . 1 1 
Influence on the Development of 

its Colleges . . . .12 
Honours Schools , 12, 31, 41-2 
Its Degrees open to Women n, 87 



VICTORIA UNIVERSITY continued. 
Relations of the Colleges to the 

University . . . 37-42 
Functions of the University . 37 
Visitor of the University . . 37 
University Authorities . . 37 

Chancellor ..... 38 
Vice-Chancellor .... 38 
Court . 38 

Council ..... 39 
Convocation .... 39 
Professors .... 39, 40 
Lecturers . . . . 39, 40 
Examiners ..... 40 
General Board of Studies . . 40 
Examinations and Degrees . 40-42 
Cost of University Courses . . 42 
*Villy, Francis . . . . 213, 228 
Volunteer Company . . . . 1 28 



*Walder, Ernest . . . 136, 1 61 

*Walder, Heinrich . . . 134 

Walker, William . . . '47 

Walmsley, Francis Harrison . . 26 

Walters, Miss Annie . . .138 

Walton, W. . 1 23 

Warburton, Thomas, Bequest of .139 

Ward, Principal Adolphus William 8 note, 

10, 15, 19, 25, 28, 46, 51, 128, 155 not. i. 

161, 164 

Portrait of . . . 1 18, 152 

*Ward, Prof. Harry Marshall 75, 135, 213 

Ward, J. Langfield . . . .146 

Ward, Mrs. J. Langfield . . .146 

Ward, William 152 

Warren, Thomas Herbert . . .16 
Waterhouse, Alfred (see also below) 

6, 122, 147 
Waterhouse and Son, Messrs. Alfred, 

ii, 35. "7 

Waterlow and Sons, Messrs. . . ii 
Waters, A. W. . . .122 

Waters, William Horscraft . 97, 98 
Watson, Prof. Morison . 93, 94, 218 

Watts, John .... 6 

*Watts, William Marshall . . . 204 
Weiss, Prof. Frederick Ernest, 

27, 74, 91, 124, 213 

*Whatmough, William Henry . 195 

Whitaker, Thomas Hordern . .146 

*Whitehead, Prof. Walter 27, 106, 107, 240 



( 260 ) 



MVhitney, Rev. James Pounder . 47, 51 

Whittaker, George Oldham . 113,240 

Whitworth, Sir Joseph, Bart, (see also 

Whitworth Legatees) . . .14 

Medallion and Portrait of . . 152 

Whitworth, Lady . . . .14 
Whitworth Engineering Laboratory, 

15. 3 6 , 6o 

Whitworth Hall . . . 18, 35, 36 

Whitworth Legatees, The 14, 17, 19, 29, 

56, 58,62, 120, 121, 123, 124, 126, 130 

*Wild, John . . .193 

*Wild, Robert Briggs ii, 98, 105, 224, 229 

Wilde, Henry . 25, 57 

Wilkins, Prof. Augustus Samuel 

ii, 8 note, 9, 27, 43, 44, 87, 159, 160 
*Wilkinson, Henry Spenser . 154 

Wilkinson, Matthew Alexander Eason 

7 note 2 

*Wilkinson, Oswald . . . .71 
*Williams, Prof. William Carleton 

70, 71, 184, 187, 204 

*Williamson, Richard Thomas 78, 105, 241-2 
Williamson, Prof. William Crawford 

4, 8 note, 73, 75, 77, 122, 123, 213-6 

Portrait of . . . . 152 

*Wills, William Leonard . . 204 

Wilson, Arthur 85 

Wilson, Miss Edith Caroline . 86, 169 
* Wilson, George . . . 59, 182 
*Wilson, H. . . . . . 223 

Windsor, Thomas . . . .109 

*Winstanley, Miss Lilian . . .161 
Withers, Prof. Harry Livingston 28, 78 
Wollaston, George Hyde . . -152 



Wollaston, William Hyde, Portrait of 152 
Women, Classes for (see also Depart- 
ment for Women) .... 9 
Woodiwis, James . . . .140 
Woolley and Sons, Messrs. . 142, 144 
Woolner, Thomas . . . 150, 152 
Working Men's College.Great Ormond 

Street, London ... 5 note 
Works of Art in possession of the 

College . . . . 147-15* 

*Worthington, Arthur Henry 26, 27, 131, 154 

*Worthington, William Barton . 154 

Worthington (? William Henry) . 148 

Wright, George Arthur 

106, 107, 229, 230, 242-3 
*Wright, Richard Thomas . .154 

*Wright, William .... 94 



Yorkshire, Members of Parliament for, 

on Court of Governors . 24 note, 26 
Yorkshire College, Leeds 

10, n, 21, 37, 38 note i, 39 note 
Young, Prof. Alfred Harry 27, 93, 94, 95, 

107, 156, 218-9 

*Young, Prof. Sydney . . 70, 204 
Younger, Quarter-Master Sergeant 
George . . . . .127 



Zoology . 



72-3, 93. 204-216 






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